Glenwood 116 to Help Out Little Tiget

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Sunny Boy
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Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Thu. Nov. 29, 2018 8:25 am

Wren wrote:
Wed. Nov. 28, 2018 7:15 pm
Wow. Hard to imagine and very sorry about the pain. Terrible. Humans are resilient, more or less.
Work work and work at home are busy. But it feels good to get things done and that the range is only heating the house now or close to that.
That is why I need the ten hour healthy burn. I like to come home to a warm house and if necessary I can go up to sleep and I don't care if it's fifty downstairs in the morning but I shut the kitchen door if range running alone.
No one is home during the day the two youngest can let the dogs out later but I don't really like them doing the coal unless they are staying to keep an eye on it.
Did you say you have not had to start up the 111 yet?


Wren, I'm a bit confused here,..... are you saying you can only get a ten hour burn ?

Your C model range has a larger firebox than my Sunny range - and the 116 is about the same size as my #6 base heater. Both stoves should each easily get 12 hour burns on nut coal before they need any tending.

There's some tricks to do a burn that long with the range and still have enough healthy firebed to make recovery easy. But the 116 has coal capacity to far exceed 12 hour burns - it's the ash buildup that limits it's burn time.

Not sure if I mentioned this long-burn technique when you first got the range. I posted about how to get long burns with a range for new member JPG who is running a very small ship-board range.
Newbie with Shipmate 212

Paul


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Wren
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: Tiger 130, Glenwood 116, Glenwood 208 C
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Other Heating: Drolet woodstove, gas
Location: Canada

Post By: Wren » Thu. Nov. 29, 2018 11:08 pm

It varies a lot. If I leave the range untouched I think the longest burn was was from about 9 p.m. to 3 p.m. the next day. I wanted to clean it out so left it and was amazed. But, sometimes the range is almost out when I get home after about ten hours. Usually still going but no one has touched it either way.
If the 116 is full it will be going well enough after 10 hours untouched to load it without losing it but at 35 below no. It would be out could never leave... but that was last year house less finished. This year have only run it a few times 12 and 20 below Celsius and it.
I'll give that link a read, thanks. Neeeeever could have burned coal with out the forum. And I really needed to burn coal so am always very grateful.

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Wren
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Post By: Wren » Fri. Nov. 30, 2018 7:22 pm

If possible, no rush, I wouldn't mind seeing a photo of the modification you did to the sliding damper. That sounds like a good idea.
And I'd like to put mica in the broker door too? No rush, but I guess it would be nice.
I guess with time it will all get better but I'm happy enough now.

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Sunny Boy
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Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Fri. Nov. 30, 2018 8:35 pm

Wren wrote:
Fri. Nov. 30, 2018 7:22 pm
If possible, no rush, I wouldn't mind seeing a photo of the modification you did to the sliding damper. That sounds like a good idea.
And I'd like to put mica in the broker door too? No rush, but I guess it would be nice.
I guess with time it will all get better but I'm happy enough now.
The first picture is the five primary dampers open down below in the ash drawer door, with the four, now mica-windowed, secondary dampers showing above in the broiler door.

The second picture shows the slight taper I filed to the slots of the two end primary openings. Notice that the three middle slots are closed when the two end ones are not yet fully closed.

Those two small, tapered openings are enough (along with the rest of the normal air leakage), to allow the filled-to-the-top firebed to idle down at night. Even with the strong drafting tall brick chimney it will idle down and run well at just .005-.007 mano readings.

The results are that the top plates over the firebed stay in the 550-650F surface temp range. And the stove pipe, about two feet up from the cooktop, is around 110-115F. My 2-1/2 qt tea kettle stays at about 205-210F water temp by morning if left on the middle back round cover. In really cold weather the kitchen stays at least 65F and it has a tall ceiling, old an window and outside door next to the range and three very tall windows along another outside wall, plus doors to three other rooms, plus a register in the ceiling to allow heat to our bedroom upstairs.

The mica for secondary damper windows is easy to install. Just cut to size with scissors, to fit between the slide's locating and stop tabs on the inside of the broiler door. Those little tabs will hold the mice in place. Then slipped in between the secondary slide damper and the damper openings in the Glenwood broiler doors.

The slide handle is spring-loaded so you can pry the slide slightly away from the openings with a screwdriver or knife blade, so that you can slip the mica in between. I use two layers to help protect if it gets hit by pieces of popping coal. Then just leave the slide in the open position and the mica will close off all air trying to get in that way, while you enjoy the view.

Paul
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Wren
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Post By: Wren » Sat. Dec. 01, 2018 10:02 pm

Ohhhh. Okay now I understand how you did it. Thanks for the posting. It's a very good idea.

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Wren
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Post By: Wren » Sun. Dec. 16, 2018 10:06 pm

20181212_104008.jpg
A peaceful moment.

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Sunny Boy
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Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Tue. Dec. 18, 2018 4:24 pm

Nice picture.

But it shows your range top plates are not sitting down to seal some of their edges, causing over-fire air leaks. Do you get a smell of sulfur every time you refuel the firebox ?

Mine did that when I got it. The T and I top plates were warped from the previous owner running wood fires too hot. I replaced the four T and I plates so that the round covers - which were not warped - could sit level and all eight removable top plates seal better. Without all that over-fire air leakage the stove was much easier and faster to start a fire, and faster to refuel and make changes in cooking temps. And no more sulfur smell in the kitchen everytime I refueled it.

One other thing that can contribute to the plates not sitting down level is ash buildup under the center support pedestal that is under the center of those eight top plates and it sits on the left side of the oven top.

Next time the stove is cool. Take off the top plates, pull the cotter pin out of the pedestal base and clean the ash out from under. That will help get the center of the group back down so that those top plates are not pushed up in the middle causing air leaks over the fire at their outer edges.

Mine

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joeq
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Post By: joeq » Tue. Dec. 18, 2018 5:49 pm

Wow. Nothing gets by Paul. Good catch boss. :)


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Wren
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: Tiger 130, Glenwood 116, Glenwood 208 C
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Location: Canada

Post By: Wren » Mon. Dec. 24, 2018 7:05 pm

Thanks. I appreciate that very much. Lol, yes Joeq, isnt Sunny clever? Have a week off now and might try.
No, I dont smell sulpher ever except outside sometimes. Not often though. I ...cant whisper online...pile dark ash from under the oven around the edges or use tinfoil. Lately regret trying gasket cement horrible idea.
Merry Christmas everybody!!!
Thank God for coal. It's dipping, the temps. About now last year we hit 35 below for three weeks straight every single day
20181219_101039.jpg
but then I didnt have the range in yet. Wonder what's in store but I think Im ready and God help those who arent.

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Wren
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Post By: Wren » Thu. Jan. 10, 2019 9:56 pm

Spinning top was turning when I left this morning. We are having high winds and -25 Celsius for the weekend. Minus twenty tonight.
Although Im still not getting consistently good 12 hour burns ...yet... Im not where I was at the beginning with the fire going out before my eyes. Got home at seven pm in time to add charcoal but the house was still warm and I know the stoves can handle the weather.
It's starting to be a really good feeling.
I just have to plan a bit around my schedule so that if I'm getting home late the house has been well heated ahead. No running out in the morning, letting the house cool off and then staying up later until midnight to warm the house. Cant because I get too tired. Too tired!
Feeling very glad of the coal stoves tonight.

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joeq
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Post By: joeq » Thu. Jan. 10, 2019 11:45 pm

So Jen, are all 3 lit right now? I'm assuming your 116 has the most "staying" power? ;)

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Sunny Boy
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Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
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Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Thu. Jan. 10, 2019 11:55 pm

Your getting there. And yes, long burn times can be done with a range that size.

But don't expect long burns with those warped Tees and Eyes cooktop plates over the firebed. You may not realize how much they are leaking overfire air and are stalling the fire when you damper it down for a long run. The only way to counteract those leaks is open the primary more and keep it running hotter, which obviously, will also shorten the burn times. Been there, done that,.... and was amazed at how new, flat cooktop plates made the stove not only able to run longer, it also made it much more controllable, faster to startup, and faster to respond to heat demand changes when needed.

Your using about the same size stoves I am, except your Modern C has a slightly larger firebox than my Glenwood Sunny. But the 116 firepot is the same capacity as my #6.

And yes, there's learning curve to running them both, especially with two stoves with such different fire box sizes and needs.

The range will need to be refueled before it ashes up,.... the 116 will need ashes cleared before it runs out of fuel. But both can easily be worked on a 12 hour fill and ash cycle.

Took me awhile to learn what order to fuel and ash which stove to reduce the time, plus not have one stove so burned down that it takes a long time to build the firebed back up. I find that if I remember to feed the range firebed a 3-4 shovels full after dinner, by bed time it take less time to refuel it for the night.

Unlike the 116 - which can hold more than 12 hours fuel - the range must be very well cleared of ash before a long burn so that you can fit as much fresh coal in the firebox as possible. Fully ash and empty just before the longest run time and it will stay running longer. A full ash pan seems to not help it run longer as much as an empty pan does. May have something to do with how the primary air moves quickly through the damper openings and then has the larger space of an empty ash pan ( a plenum effect) to gain more preheat before going up through the grates ? Whatever it is, that's how it works with my range. Might with yours, too ?????

And when I mean the range needs to be fully ashed, you shake ashes until you see the ash pan has a bright orange/yellow glow throughout. The more ash you get out of the firebed the more coal fits in, plus the longer it will burn before ash buildup becomes a problem for the firebed to breath.

Another help for longer burn times, if it's possible, dig through your coal storage to use a higher concentration of the smaller sizes of coal chunks, That will increase the fuel density in the firebox and thus help it run longer when it's dampered down of overnight. Save the bigger chunks for when you want faster, hotter cooking/baking times.

And, don't worry about over heating those triangular grates in the range because when you fill the firebox right up to the cooktop plates for the night, and then set the primary damper to only open a sliver, and the MPD fully closed, it won't burn hot enough to harm the grates, or the cooktop plates.

As the fire slowly burns it's way up through the firebed to near the top by morning time, the coal in the firebox has burned enough that the level has dropped down to the point that the firebed won't be close enough to over heat them.

However, when your running the firebed hotter during the day, never fill the firebed to the cooktop plates. Leave at least an inch gap over the firebed or the plates will eventually warp like yours are now.

Paul

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joeq
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Post By: joeq » Fri. Jan. 11, 2019 6:24 am

Hey Paul, did you ever think about writing a book? Seriously, I don't know how many authors out there have the knowledge, (and a few other members here) that is required to operate these stoves. I have "1", (book) but it's nowhere as detailed as what we need to be effective and efficient.

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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 16666
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Fri. Jan. 11, 2019 9:08 am

Gave a quick thought, once, but decided not to, Joe.

Whatever I could put into a book, there's much, much more about using coal and coal stoves and where to buy it all on this site.

If I wrote a book, I'd probably not want to help out here because it might hurt sales of a book. Then you'd have to buy my book to see what your missing. :D

Plus, I get to interact with some great people, who are smart enough to be using a coal range. ;)

What I should do is cut and paste some of these tips on long running for Jen's range, to the Cookin' With Coal thread so that it's all under one search topic.

Paul

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Wren
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: Tiger 130, Glenwood 116, Glenwood 208 C
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Other Heating: Drolet woodstove, gas
Location: Canada

Post By: Wren » Fri. Jan. 11, 2019 9:50 pm

Yes. Every time another person joins its worth reading what you tell them as a refresher course sort of. I did read the link you sent.
The previous owner used wood and had spoken of the warp but last year I never had the problem he spoke of where the eye rocks and tips he said just press it down.
I have probably been filling it too full this year but Im speculating. I'm not sure what I've done. The broiler door is showing air along the top edge and it did not last year. I'll fill lower and hope it warps back into place.
Once the house work is done I'll have them taken apart and put back together properly and recast things and no I dont hope to do it myself.
I was gone about 11 hours today and left both full and shut down. It's-25 but only Celsius still it a mean walk. The house was warm from the 116 and the range was red but close to gone. House warm so no complaints, kitchen colder but still over 70.
Joeq, I'm only running the range and the 116 and that's enough ash pan emptying and skuttle scooting for me. Although I would love to put one in the basement but that becomes three to tend not yhat the Tiger was much trouble I suppose. The ash pan is tiny and light. Have you fired up the little gothic stove yet? I read your 111 posts but wondered if?
My middle son has gone to study now but while he was here he seemed to think it was all common sense about air and so on and was pretty calm about it all. Enjoyed sitting in a big chair in the kitchen reading with the 208. He said, " The heat is pleasant but it would be nice if someone made a stove that would feed itself."
So I had to tell him there are Hitzers or something with hoppers now. The the haughty kid gave me a look between shock and disgust that he'd been left in the house with the primitive model. I suppose he has a point in a way.


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