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Stoker boiler build

Posted: Fri. Jan. 05, 2018 9:19 pm
By: Willis
Need some help on a new project. Wife and I bought new farm up the road and already thinking ahead to heating the "new" 1845 brick farm house that is approx. 3000 sq feet. I was considering something outdoor as in stoker boiler in out building. I have plenty of Will-Burt stokers laying around just trying to figure out what to mate it to. I like the idea of being able to expand it into heating a future garage I would like to build also.

So the question is what boiler would you use. Is there an advantage of horizontal boiler over a vertical boiler like an old snowman boiler of years gone by.

I know plenty about stokers but not so much about boilers.

Re: Stoker boiler build

Posted: Sat. Jan. 06, 2018 7:00 am
By: creek44
Hi neighbor!
I am located in Richmond, OH . A few years back, I was heating the homestead with a Heatmor OWB. As wood burning became more difficult, I tried burning some bituminous from Holloway with the wood which did not work well. I had shaker grates installed on the Heatmor. I even contacted Wil Burt to look into fitting a stoker to the Heatmor. It would be possible, but sourcing stoker coal was going to be an issue. Glad I discovered this forum and the attributes of the EFM stoker boiler. I am anxious to see what boiler you end up matching with your stoker.

Re: Stoker boiler build

Posted: Sun. Jan. 07, 2018 1:32 pm
By: Willis
Creek, yes we are almost neighbors! I delivered coal last night to Richmond!
That is probably the biggest issue with burning coal , the appliance that is being used is really not made to burn coal. All of the OWB companies think that just because you put rinky dink undersized shaker grates in all the sudden it is a coal burner. Even though the firebox is in no way suited to coal combustion. Or if you are trying to heat a 3000 Ft house with a Hotblast you bought at Tractor Supply. Then they blame the coal.
Sorry for the rant, drives me crazy. Glad to see you have a dedicated coal burner even if it is that other black stuff!

Hopefully some boiler guys will be by to lead me in right direction.

Re: Stoker boiler build

Posted: Sun. Jan. 07, 2018 11:07 pm
By: creek44
Had I known 7 years ago that bituminous stoker coal was available locally, it may have been a game changer for me. I must say though that I have no regrets about going the EFM route. I enjoyed rebuilding the EFM and got quite an education as a result of the process. Still learning. Nothing like coal for warmth these cold nights.
I am sure that someone has experience with what you are wanting to do.

Re: Stoker boiler build

Posted: Sun. Jan. 07, 2018 11:24 pm
By: Pacowy
I believe there was a member who had a National sectional boiler powered by a bit stoker. We also have a member running an International water tube boiler powered by an EFM anthracite stoker, and another member running a Gentleman Janitor (normally anthracite) boiler powered by a Motor Stokor burning bit. If you have a bit stoker, I think your options are defined largely by the capacity and physical compatibility of available boilers.

Mike

Re: Stoker boiler build

Posted: Mon. Jan. 08, 2018 4:01 pm
By: Pacowy
Is there a boiler in the brick farm house now?

Mike

Re: Stoker boiler build

Posted: Wed. Jan. 10, 2018 10:34 pm
By: Willis
Mike, no boiler currently , fuel oil forced air. I could take my forced air stoked with me but like the idea of being able to build larger coal storage area outside and pipe hot water to a heat exchanger in an air handler so I can also add central air to house. House was originally fireplaces , then upgraded to gravity coal sometime last century. Previous owner put fuel oil tanks in coal cellar and installed fuel furnace.

I guess first question is can you operated old cast iron boiler as hot water system rather than steam or is there any advantage to either system?

As I stated before I am not well versed on boiler theory.

Re: Stoker boiler build

Posted: Thu. Jan. 11, 2018 8:52 am
By: Pacowy
AFAIK the same boiler vessel generally can be used for hot water or steam; the difference would be in the controls, and maybe a bushing or two to change pipe sizing. There are a few newer, smaller boilers that aren't rated for steam.

I like steam, and have run steam systems in several old houses, but for someone starting from scratch hot water is generally going to be the logical selection. I think you would have to go to New Zealand to find a forum member who has voluntarily installed a steam system in this millennium.

Mike