Independent Super Heater by Stokermatic

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blackascoal
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Post By: blackascoal » Thu. Aug. 14, 2014 3:13 pm

I am sorry to bother you, but if you could help me out, or point me in the right direction I would surely appreciate it!

I moved into a house and we have an "Independent Super Heater by Stokermatic".
It looks very similar to this one I found here:
I was wondering how safe these are? I have small kids so the idea scares me quite a bit. Also, It is huge! If I keep it, I want to move it. It takes up so much living room space. Our house was built in 1886, so moving a wall at this time isn't an option. :)

Thank you!
Last edited by blackascoal on Thu. Sep. 28, 2017 7:49 pm, edited 8 times in total.
Reason: Changed title

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blrman07
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Post By: blrman07 » Thu. Aug. 14, 2014 3:24 pm

By putting stokermatic in the search box located at the top right of the screen I found an operating/owners manual for it. This is the link. Download it and give it a good read. Others will be chiming in soon.

Stokermatic Superheater Manual & Over-Fire Air Jet

Rev. Larry
New Beginning Church
Ashland Pa.

blackascoal
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Post By: blackascoal » Thu. Aug. 14, 2014 3:37 pm

Thank you! Sorry, I just have no idea what I am doing! I didn't even know these existed until I moved here.

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coaledsweat
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Post By: coaledsweat » Thu. Aug. 14, 2014 4:41 pm

blackascoal wrote:Thank you! Sorry, I just have no idea what I am doing! I didn't even know these existed until I moved here.
You'll be an expert in no time, with a big grin on your face. :)


franco b
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Post By: franco b » Thu. Aug. 14, 2014 4:45 pm

blackascoal wrote:Thank you! Sorry, I just have no idea what I am doing! I didn't even know these existed until I moved here.
It seems to me important that someone familiar with stokers and hopefully that particular make, inspect the stove and installation for safety. Perhaps fire it up for you and explain operation.

Fill in your location and perhaps a member lives nearby that could help.

blackascoal
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Post By: blackascoal » Thu. Aug. 14, 2014 6:13 pm

I am in Utah, I will update that though.

Do you know how far it has to sit away from the walls? I didn't see those demensions in the manual. I would like to at least move it, if at all possible. :)

Rob R.
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Post By: Rob R. » Thu. Aug. 14, 2014 6:14 pm

It is currently installed in your living room?

blackascoal
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Post By: blackascoal » Thu. Aug. 14, 2014 6:22 pm

Yes, and it is really awkward.


franco b
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Post By: franco b » Thu. Aug. 14, 2014 6:44 pm

blackascoal wrote:Yes, and it is really awkward.
Whoever put it there probably thought it was awkward too, but that being cold was even more awkward.

Because it has a metal jacket my guess is that 18 inches from the wall would be safe. By putting a heat shield on the wall you could probably go closer than that.

In Utah you probably can only get soft coal which can vary quite a lot. I think you have to speak to local people to find out local conditions and other people familiar with that stoker. Ask the building inspector for leads or any coal supplier. Finding the coal for it has to come first. Read the manual that Rev Larry posted the link for.

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McGiever
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Post By: McGiever » Thu. Aug. 14, 2014 9:05 pm

http://www.stokerworx.com/index.html

If you give Annette a call she could give you good advice about any of your concerns.

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carlherrnstein
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Post By: carlherrnstein » Thu. Aug. 14, 2014 10:03 pm

I have a combustioneer 77 its very similar. They are IMO very safe if you keep the hopper full of coal and keep the chimney clear of ash. Forum member Rockwood might know more about those.

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rockwood
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Post By: rockwood » Sat. Aug. 16, 2014 10:52 pm

Hello blackascoal.

I'm a bit late to respond here but maybe you'll see this. (I don't visit this forum much during summer)

Could you please give me some details about your stove:

--There should be an emblem on the front of the unit in the upper left corner. Does it look like the one pictured below?
2695392.jpg
--Does this stove have a 'squirrel cage' blower on the back of the stove, or is it a regular looking fan?

The questions above will help me estimate the age of your stove but it would really help if you could post some photos of the stove.

The main decision whether or not to heat with coal depends on you. Using coal is a hands on venture. If you don't have a problem carrying a bucket or two of coal to the stove every day and tending the fire (removing clinkers) on average once per day then heating with coal may be for you.

Do you know if natural gas is available where this home is located? If gas service is not available then coal will be by far the most economical fuel for you to heat your home with...but it does take more effort than simply turning a thermostat up or down.

Did the previous home owner tell you anything about heating with coal?

There is much more I could add but I'll wait for a reply before going further.

Hope to hear from you.

mcrchap
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Post By: mcrchap » Wed. Sep. 03, 2014 3:10 pm

Get the chimney cleaned, empty the ash pit every day, don't put hot ashes in plastic buckets and you'll have cheap, good heat. If you are reluctant, purchase a good CO detector and you'll sleep better at night. Coal gas smells like sulphur, is not pleasant but as far as I know is not dangerous. The dangerous stuff is CO and you can't smell that. That's why you want to have a dector.

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