I'm New Here. Saey 92

JoshuaDOC
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Joined: Mon. Nov. 24, 2008 7:51 am
Stove/Furnace Make: Saey 92

Post Mon. Nov. 24, 2008 8:09 am

I have been lurking here for about 4 months. My wife and I decided to add a wood or coal stove to our home this past summer. We searched and found a Saey 92 locally (didn't have to wait for freight). It was installed in mid-September. We were trying to add options for heating in case the power goes out and obviously to offset the price of oil. It accomplishes that beautifully.

Last season we used about 650 gallons of oil to heat and sustain 55 degrees. I am now heating the house to about 70 on average (by room). Obviously cooler upstairs than down but about 80 in the room with the stove. That would cost me 1200 gallons of oil +/-. It will pay for itself in 2 seasons.

I built the hearth myself. My first time doing tiling of any kind. I bought all 1'x1' tiles and cut them down to size. It's MUCH cheaper to cut your own.

Making heat
Image

The dog LOVES it.
Image

Detail of the ledge. I cut this stone ledge from a piece of native walkway flagstone that I pulled out of my backyard. I used a stone blade in my circ saw to do it.
Image

I still have a lot of questions about firing it. Obviously each installation is different and each stove varies in how it functions. I have had some good burns and some failures but it has been going strong for almost two months and my oil furnace has not yet been turned on. I also have questions on buying coal that I'm sure you folks will be able to add insight.

So... Great forum! I have already learned a lot here and look forward to contributing a bit of my own insight as well.


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cArNaGe
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Post Mon. Nov. 24, 2008 8:48 am

Looks very nice!

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titleist1
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Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Mag Stoker (old style) one in basement, one in workshop
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III on standby for long power outages
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite; Nut/Anthracite
Location: Cecil County, MD

Post Mon. Nov. 24, 2008 9:55 am

Welcome to the forum and that is a very nice looking install! Nice looking tile job. I recently tackled our kitchen backsplash for my first tile job and am now ready for a bigger tile challenge.

The "dog-o-stat" makes it obvious it is working well! :D

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the snowman
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: Jotul 507
Coal Size/Type: Nut, Stove coal, Egg coal
Location: upstate NY Tug Hill area

Post Mon. Nov. 24, 2008 11:47 am

Nice stove and tile work. I agree the dog-o-stat seems to be working fine.

the snowman

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Devil505
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Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: TLC-2000
Location: SE Massachusetts

Post Mon. Nov. 24, 2008 12:00 pm

JoshuaDOC wrote:Obviously each installation is different and each stove varies in how it functions. I have had some good burns and some failures but it has been going strong for almost two months and my oil furnace has not yet been turned on.
Welcome! Nice looking installation & nice work keeping it going for a few weeks! You are right about each stove/installation being a bit different but you'll find many more universal traits/techniques than differences. If you haven't read through them yet there are some good threads on shaking down & air circulation that are pretty universal for us hand fired guys.
Probably the most useful tip I can give you is to have someone spread a fresh shovel full (or 2) of coal across the fire every 4-6 hrs if someone is home. That way you'll never be trying to save an almost dead fire.

JoshuaDOC
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Stove/Furnace Make: Saey 92

Post Mon. Nov. 24, 2008 2:03 pm

Thanks Devil. I will add that trick to the repetoire.

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Adamiscold
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Stove/Furnace Make: Chubby Sr. Old School
Location: Winchendon,Ma

Post Mon. Nov. 24, 2008 5:21 pm

Nice set up, great job with the tiling.

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tsb
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Stoker Coal Boiler: Binford 2000
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL Pioneer top vent
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Saey Hanover II
Baseburners & Antiques: Grander Golden Oak , Glenwood # 6
Coal Size/Type: All of them
Location: Douglassville, Pa

Post Mon. Nov. 24, 2008 9:07 pm

Nice looking setup.
I burn two Saey stoves. Hanover I and Hanover II. From the pictures it looks like you've got it pretty wide open. I keep mine chocked down. This allows me to get through the work day with out worrying about the stoves. With the Saey, you'll need to poke the corners and slice the grates. That's
what the pokey tool is that came with the stove. I burn about 4 and a half tons a year with both stoves burning.

Good Luck

TSB


JoshuaDOC
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Stove/Furnace Make: Saey 92

Post Mon. Nov. 24, 2008 10:35 pm

Thanks TSB.

The picture was taken first thing in the morning Sunday. It was chilly up here in NY (12 degrees) and I had just banked it and got it rocking to drink my coffee by. I run it in the middle quarters (1/4 - 3/4 open) generally.

How often do you slice the grates and what coal are you burning? I shake it down 2-3 times a day generally. Slice and poke once. Running hot it locks up with a nice molten looking foamy clinker. I'm burning Kimmels... Just curious what other people use with a setup like this.

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tsb
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Stoker Coal Boiler: Binford 2000
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL Pioneer top vent
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Saey Hanover II
Baseburners & Antiques: Grander Golden Oak , Glenwood # 6
Coal Size/Type: All of them
Location: Douglassville, Pa

Post Tue. Nov. 25, 2008 6:02 pm

I leave for work by 6:30 so the stoves gets a good shake and poke then. I'm usually home by 4:00 to 4:30. This time I shake, slice the grates, and empty the ash pans. We usually nod off by 11:00. Stoves get a short shake and a front and corner poke. If the hopper is really low sometime during the day, I'll reach in from the top and poke the back edge of the fire box. The surface temperature is about 300-400 on both stoves.

I've been burning Meadowbrook pea coal for the last five years. It is southern range coal which makes it a little more volatile than the northern coal, but it burns hot and is very easy to light. Going for coal is an adventure that I look forward to each year. I get up early and make a day of it.

I haven't had a clinker in five years.

TSB

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Rob R.
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Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Lehigh Rice
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy
Location: Chazy, NY

Post Tue. Nov. 25, 2008 8:53 pm

JoshuaDOC wrote: The picture was taken first thing in the morning Sunday. It was chilly up here in NY (12 degrees) and I had just banked it and got it rocking to drink my coffee by. I run it in the middle quarters (1/4 - 3/4 open) generally.

How often do you slice the grates and what coal are you burning? I shake it down 2-3 times a day generally. Slice and poke once. Running hot it locks up with a nice molten looking foamy clinker. I'm burning Kimmels... Just curious what other people use with a setup like this.
Where in NY? You must be running it pretty warm to hit the ash fusion temp and form clinkers, I've been burning Kimmels nut in my Hitzer for about a month and have yet to form a clinker.

JoshuaDOC
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Stove/Furnace Make: Saey 92

Post Tue. Nov. 25, 2008 10:40 pm

tsb wrote:I leave for work by 6:30 so the stoves gets a good shake and poke then. I'm usually home by 4:00 to 4:30. This time I shake, slice the grates, and empty the ash pans. We usually nod off by 11:00. Stoves get a short shake and a front and corner poke. If the hopper is really low sometime during the day, I'll reach in from the top and poke the back edge of the fire box. The surface temperature is about 300-400 on both stoves.

I've been burning Meadowbrook pea coal for the last five years. It is southern range coal which makes it a little more volatile than the northern coal, but it burns hot and is very easy to light. Going for coal is an adventure that I look forward to each year. I get up early and make a day of it.

I haven't had a clinker in five years.

TSB
That's my basic schedule... I need to get a couple magnet thermometers I guess.

JoshuaDOC
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Stove/Furnace Make: Saey 92

Post Tue. Nov. 25, 2008 10:46 pm

markviii wrote: Where in NY? You must be running it pretty warm to hit the ash fusion temp and form clinkers, I've been burning Kimmels nut in my Hitzer for about a month and have yet to form a clinker.
I'm in the Schenectady/Schoharie area.

I'm not really sure how warm I'm running it. I think I need to do a couple things. First I need to get it some outside air to reduce he negative pressure in my downstairs. I have felt a draft near the windows. Old houses...

I just dialed the baro damper off a bit too to reduce the draft. We'll see what happens.

Maybe I am overstating as well... I have a couple of times burned it till it clinkers. Like burned it on high with the damper in it's 'closed' position. Turns out great heat but I think I was over firing for that duration.

I have also burned it for a solid week without seeing any form until I messed with it (played with damper etc). Although when it doesn't form them it doesn't seem to heat as well as I'd like. Which granted is an arbitrary measure based upon no informed expectation. :)

I'm learning how to make it work well and WILL succeed. Thanks for all the kind words and insight folks.

reckebecca
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Stove/Furnace Make: Saey 92

Post Sat. Dec. 13, 2008 8:28 am

TSB,
Thank you, thank you, thank you! I too am new to coal (and also in Upstate NY - Ithaca) and have a new Saey 92 and was getting frustrated with the burn and not being able to get through draft and hence no blue flame without a fan blowing through the ash drawer. Your advice to dig out the front corners was just the information I needed. After reading that late last night I tried it and immediately had an active fire for the first time (fire built Thursday night). I had a thick be of bright glowing coal but no blue flame. The manual that comes with the stove is close to worthless for this model as the only time it's mentioned is on the cover and its adjustments are different than the Hannovers.

Now, I still found this morning that it was difficult to get draft through so that I could shake it. So, I decided that the ash I'd created with the active fire last night was getting in the way and went ahead and shook it - I think I did a bad thing! :cry: Sigh. This coal burning takes a LOT of patience.

So, I'm headed to set up my fan in the ash door again so that I can get my fire back.

~Rebecca

reckebecca
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Stove/Furnace Make: Saey 92

Post Sat. Dec. 13, 2008 8:30 am

PS - JoshuaDOC, I'm jealous of your fire pictures! I've not gotten my Saey 92 to burn like that at all.

~Rebecca


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