Pics of Jotul 507

Very popular in the 70's and 80's there is many brands of smaller hand fired coal stoves from many European countries. These can also date back to the turn of the last century. Imported stoves would include such brands as Franco Belge, Saey and Efel among many others.
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the snowman
Member
Posts: 539
Joined: Mon. Sep. 29, 2008 10:38 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Jotul 507
Coal Size/Type: Nut, Stove coal, Egg coal
Location: upstate NY Tug Hill area

Post Wed. Oct. 22, 2008 2:26 pm

Hi everyone. Here are a couple of pics of the Jotul 507 on its first burn in the house. Taking out the old buck wood stove made a mess that I eventually had to clean up. I couldn't convince my wife to clean up my mess. Funny how that is. Now since the buck is gone my wife would like me to run the tile all the way to the floor. I guess I will now since you can see that part of the stone.

wayne.
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Freddy
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Posts: 6606
Joined: Fri. Apr. 11, 2008 2:54 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined
Location: Orrington, Maine

Post Wed. Oct. 22, 2008 2:34 pm

That's a really pretty set up. Thanks for sharing!
Orrington, Maine
Fred

"If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all".

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the snowman
Member
Posts: 539
Joined: Mon. Sep. 29, 2008 10:38 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Jotul 507
Coal Size/Type: Nut, Stove coal, Egg coal
Location: upstate NY Tug Hill area

Post Wed. Oct. 22, 2008 3:02 pm

Freddy:

Thanks. It is a lot smaller than the buck was. The buck took up the entire area between the pillers. It has been down to twenty five degrees at night and only in the low thirties during the day and the house is still at 72 F. I have most of the house closed down which brings me from 2500 sq. ft. to 1060 sq. ft. Eventhough the Jotul is a lot smaller, the buck didn't put out near as much heat or consistently as the Jotul does.

wayne.

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coalkirk
Member
Posts: 4682
Joined: Wed. May. 17, 2006 8:12 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1981 EFM DF520
Coal Size/Type: anthracite/rice coal
Location: Forest Hill MD

Post Wed. Oct. 22, 2008 4:08 pm

Very nice. The Jotul should handle the 1060 sq. ft. ok. It's a nice looking, simple to operate stove. Now that I've fired up my boiler, I won't really use the one in the basement. The one in my shop will get some use though. I think you will really like using this stove.
You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life. Winston Churchill

"I would rather have a German division in front of me than a French one behind me." —General George S. Patton

Burning rice coal in a 1981 EFM DF520, nut coal in a hand fired Jotul 507.

jotuler
Member
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat. Jun. 14, 2008 5:58 am
Stove/Furnace Make: jotul 507
Stove/Furnace Model: Harmon mark II
Location: Westtown N.Y.

Post Wed. Oct. 22, 2008 4:24 pm

Job well done snowman, great pics. How long were you able to burn at those outside temps?
Jotuler
"The only time you can coast in life is when you are going down hill." A. Roger Merrill

User avatar
the snowman
Member
Posts: 539
Joined: Mon. Sep. 29, 2008 10:38 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Jotul 507
Coal Size/Type: Nut, Stove coal, Egg coal
Location: upstate NY Tug Hill area

Post Wed. Oct. 22, 2008 5:39 pm

Jotuler:

I have been filling it up at 10:30 p.m. and by eleven the stove is back up to temp and all of the coal is burning well. I have been leaving it alone until 9:30 a.m. I tried to wait until 10:30 a.m. yesterday, however, it went out. All of the coal was burned up and all I had in the unit was ash. I have decided that I don't like restarting the unit. I don't think I will let it go out again. I am using Blashak nut coal. I thought it would be a little more uniform in size, however, I don't hear the stove complaining about it. I have been burning the stove with my draft control on the bottom door set between three and four. I set it between four and five yesterday just to see how much of a temp change I would get and the temp in the house went from 72 F to over 80 F. I thought about trying a couple bags of jeddo. I'm not saying I'm unhappy with the blashak; I just thought I would try some other stuff. What do you think? Any suggestions? It is definitely nice not having to come in from the wood shop every hour to feed a wood stove (aka money pit). I'm sure that as the temps get closer to zero and below I will be burning more coal. So far the stove has been exceeding my expectations. That is a good thing.

The snowman

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bear creek burnout
Member
Posts: 245
Joined: Tue. Jul. 08, 2008 1:40 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Hitzer
Stove/Furnace Model: 503 Insert
Location: NEPA

Post Wed. Oct. 22, 2008 5:48 pm

Snowman.....I love the hearth....pillars and all...it must have been a grand ole fireplace. Please describe the house history & design.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming, "Wow, what a ride!!!"

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-Albert Einstein

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coalkirk
Member
Posts: 4682
Joined: Wed. May. 17, 2006 8:12 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1981 EFM DF520
Coal Size/Type: anthracite/rice coal
Location: Forest Hill MD

Post Wed. Oct. 22, 2008 7:22 pm

the snowman wrote:I have been burning the stove with my draft control on the bottom door set between three and four. I set it between four and five yesterday just to see how much of a temp change I would get and the temp in the house went from 72 F to over 80 F.
I had run mine in the basement on 2 to 2 1/2 and I get 12 hours burns without any problem. Plenty of hot coals left after shake down to load it up again. I've never run mine up that high.
You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life. Winston Churchill

"I would rather have a German division in front of me than a French one behind me." —General George S. Patton

Burning rice coal in a 1981 EFM DF520, nut coal in a hand fired Jotul 507.


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CozyMan
New Member
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed. Oct. 22, 2008 2:38 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Jotul, nr 507b
Location: Binghamton, NY

Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2008 1:53 pm

Gentlemen:
I have never had a solid-fuel burning stove & have never had the opportunity to use one. I have recently acquired a Jotul nr 507b. It has a 5" diameter outlet exiting the rear towards the upper end, similar to the ones in your pictures. Should I, therefore, attach a 5" pipe or a 6" pipe with an adapter that goes from 5" to 6" in diameter? Please share your knowledge.
Don't grow old; & choose your parents well.

User avatar
coalkirk
Member
Posts: 4682
Joined: Wed. May. 17, 2006 8:12 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1981 EFM DF520
Coal Size/Type: anthracite/rice coal
Location: Forest Hill MD

Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2008 7:13 pm

On mine I started with a 5' to 6" adapter and ran all 6" pipe. It will work fine. I only did it because I couldn't find 5" black smoke pipe and barometrc damper locally. Congrats on the Jotul.
You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life. Winston Churchill

"I would rather have a German division in front of me than a French one behind me." —General George S. Patton

Burning rice coal in a 1981 EFM DF520, nut coal in a hand fired Jotul 507.

User avatar
the snowman
Member
Posts: 539
Joined: Mon. Sep. 29, 2008 10:38 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Jotul 507
Coal Size/Type: Nut, Stove coal, Egg coal
Location: upstate NY Tug Hill area

Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2008 10:26 pm

Congrats on the Jotul. Post some pics of it; we like to see pics. I attached my 5 to 6" adapter to the back of the stove. I ran with all six inch pipe. I wasn't going to look for five inch when I had all six including the baro. My chiminey has a six inch stainless steel liner. I found no issues using the six inch. Most of the 507's I have seen have come with the five to six inch adapter. I drilled my flange on the stove to accept sheet metal screws to hold the pipe on the stove. I also used three screws per connection as to insure the pipe would not come apart if I experienced a small explosion. I didn't want black dust in the house. I had a small explosion a couple of weeks ago and it was a good thing the connections were screwed together. I now spin the top draft open one full turn; this creates a secondary burn of the gases being released by the freshly added coal. This tip was from a fellow forum member who uses a 507. You will find the members of this forum to have a deep knowledge base that they are willing to share with you; all you have to do is ask. I am currently burning Blaschak nut coal in the 507. The Blaschak seems to require a lot of air, however, it burns to a nice ash with no bridging or clinkers. I have found some small pieces of shale in a couple of the bags. The 507 does not pass shale through its grate well. I have found that sometimes the shale will get lodged below the grate between the grate support and lift the grate up away from the crank gear. The grate must be turned by hand using a screwdriver or some other method to unlodge the shale and at that point the grate will settle back down on the crank gear and work just fine. Did your stove come with an owners manual? I have been trying to find a manual for a 507 since I purchased mine. If you have a manual pm me for I am willing to pay for a copy of a manual. As I have just stated if you have any questions or concerns just ask.

the snowman

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CozyMan
New Member
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed. Oct. 22, 2008 2:38 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Jotul, nr 507b
Location: Binghamton, NY

Post Wed. Nov. 05, 2008 10:07 am

Thank you both for the encouraging words & the answers to my question & additional information.

I shall post photos as I progress with its installation. I forsee a completion only for next season.

I am currently in the learning stage & have come to respect your knowledge & the time all of you take to share & to instruct & guide those of us who know less or nothing, like myself.

Unfortunately, my stove did not come with an owners' manual. I failed in the 1 attempt I made in trying to obtain a copy of an owners' manual. Rest assured, if, in the unlikely event that I should obtain a copy, I shall announce it & subsequently share it.
Don't grow old; & choose your parents well.

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Madhatter
Member
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed. Oct. 29, 2008 12:27 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark I & II
Coal Size/Type: Nut & Pea
Location: Oxford NC

Post Wed. Nov. 05, 2008 3:15 pm

Wow that is a sharp looking stove. I am not familiar with it. I see three doors. Are the two large doors the load doors? And if so does it burn in boath parts or just one large fire? Was it just luck that you found a green one to go with the tile?

Gordon

User avatar
coalkirk
Member
Posts: 4682
Joined: Wed. May. 17, 2006 8:12 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1981 EFM DF520
Coal Size/Type: anthracite/rice coal
Location: Forest Hill MD

Post Thu. Nov. 06, 2008 7:47 am

The top door is for loading, the midddle door is to allow you better access to clean it out and the bottom door is the ash cleanout. Great little stoves. Those Swedes are smart.
You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life. Winston Churchill

"I would rather have a German division in front of me than a French one behind me." —General George S. Patton

Burning rice coal in a 1981 EFM DF520, nut coal in a hand fired Jotul 507.

User avatar
the snowman
Member
Posts: 539
Joined: Mon. Sep. 29, 2008 10:38 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Jotul 507
Coal Size/Type: Nut, Stove coal, Egg coal
Location: upstate NY Tug Hill area

Post Thu. Nov. 06, 2008 8:21 am

Gordon:

It was luck to find a green one that went with the tile. I would have taken any color. The red looks sharp as well. A fellow forum member has a nice red unit. The bottom door is the ash door, the middle door is at grate level and the top door is the loading door. The Jotul may be a small stove, however, they have a nice deep coal bed. I haven't actually weighted the exact amount of coal the unit holds, however, to fill it from empty is about twenty pounds. Depending on how high you run the stove, a load can last twelve to thirteen hours. I run my unit fairly high (400-450 F)so I'm down to about nine to ten hours. My wife accidently opened the draft to the number four setting and when I came in from the shop (I always glance at the stove temp) I almost had a heart attack; the Jotul was hammering at 575 F. Needless to say I dropped what I had in my hands and spun the draft control all the way closed. I didn't open it until the stove fell to 350 F. It didn't cause any damage, however, it did give me a couple new grey hairs. When I first started burning the Jotul I set the draft between four and five for a very very short time (I was sitting watching the stove) to see if the stove could be run that high. I decided that it probably wasn't conductive to the life of the stove. I'm not sure if the Jotul can handle running at such a high temp without damage and I don't want to find out. My wife is now careful when she has to load or shake down the stove. Today I am going to go pick up another Jotul (green) at a bargin basement price. The unit has been over fired and the inside needs to be completely redone, however, the cheap price tag dictates I purchase the unit. I would rather purchase the unit than see it be taken to the scrap yard. I am always willing to answer any questions as are the members of this forum; just ask.

The snowman


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