Another Godin

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joeq
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Posts: 4765
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired
Location: Northern CT

Post By: joeq » Sun. Feb. 05, 2017 2:26 pm

Couldn't resist purchasing this stove from a local CL ad, that a buddy sent me.
I've wanted a small stove for my sunroom, and picked up the Southard Robertson a year ago for nickles, with work needed to make it usable. (Which of course is on the back burner) But I've always had a soft spot for the Godins. So here comes this Godin stove, for less than the SR stove, and my buddy says if I didn't want it, he would paint it up, and use it for "decorative" purposes. In the OPs ad, the barrel looked severely rotted, but when I went to look at it, I was surprised to see the barrel is thickly cast, and not rolled steel. It is surface rusted, but think it'll clean up to be usable. These photos are of it in my driveway, on my truck. I squirted it with WD to help loosen things up.
Image
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I'm not sure how much I like the low pipe outlet on the back, for stove pipe routing restrictions in my install, but I could make it work, if I deem the stove worthy. Am curious why Godin dropped it down like that. Is it suppose to act like a small heat exchanger, or simulate a BB? Maybe fireplace install?
The bricks inside don't look half bad, compare to the disaster in the Southard stove. It was even cushiony enuff for the rats to inhabit. :lol:
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I'm impressed with the weight of this stove, and is more rugged than I imagined. And the enamel or porcelain coating has held up really well too. I also was under the impression the grate got cleaned by riddling through the access door, but found out it has an external shaker connecting to the round grate internally, much like my 111. Not a bad purchase for $50.
P.S. The seller has another Godin in his possession, orange trim, in better shape, all the parts, for $100, if anyone's interested. I was just informed by the boss, she would rather the SR stove, than the "frilly" looking Godin. So I guess this one will be passed along to my buddy, for show only.
Last edited by joeq on Sun. Feb. 05, 2017 7:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.


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scalabro
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Baseburners & Antiques: 2 Crawford 40's, PP Stewart No. 14, Abendroth Bros "Record 40"
Coal Size/Type: Stove / Anthracite.
Other Heating: Oil fired, forced hot air.
Location: Western Massachusetts

Post By: scalabro » Sun. Feb. 05, 2017 5:19 pm

Is it me or does there appear to be a "lower" exhaust port as seen in the inside picture?

I hear the Godin is a messy stove to shakedown & service.

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joeq
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Posts: 4765
Joined: Sat. Feb. 11, 2012 11:53 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired
Location: Northern CT

Post By: joeq » Sun. Feb. 05, 2017 5:39 pm

Great observation Scott. There "is" another port down low. I don't get it. If you load the thing with coal, it will spill into that port. Haven't looked into the operations of this stove. But they do have an ash pan at the bottom. As you mentioned about dirty stove cleaning, I thought there wasn't an ash pan, and you had to shovel the ashes out the bottom. Now I see differently. Also thought the outside "catch tray", was to capture as much ash when shoveling.

franco b
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
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Coal Size/Type: nut and pea
Location: Kent CT

Post By: franco b » Sun. Feb. 05, 2017 5:57 pm

joeq wrote:Great observation Scott. There "is" another port down low. I don't get it. If you load the thing with coal, it will spill into that port. Haven't looked into the operations of this stove. But they do have an ash pan at the bottom. As you mentioned about dirty stove cleaning, I thought there wasn't an ash pan, and you had to shovel the ashes out the bottom. Now I see differently. Also thought the outside "catch tray", was to capture as much ash when shoveling.
Ash pan is very small. Rotating grate does not cover the complete bottom.

That exhaust manifold can be reversed if wanted. It is used that way to gain further heat exchange and there should be a grill to prevent entrance of coal at the lower opening, but there is a potential clog hazard.

The primary air path is both through the lower grate and also through the front grill which tends to make the burn pattern, front to back rather than from bottom to top. Coal must be above the front grill to draw properly, since there is also an opening just above that grill that conducts air to the top which can bypass the coal.

The coal bridges badly which some users use to just lower the front grill and shovel ash out rather than laboriously use the rotating grate.

The stove does heat well though.

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joeq
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Posts: 4765
Joined: Sat. Feb. 11, 2012 11:53 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired
Location: Northern CT

Post By: joeq » Sun. Feb. 05, 2017 7:26 pm

So the way I take your explanation FB, the viewing window is nothing more then a klinker window, or a view of the grate area, and the primary air runs through the adjusting knob on the frt door, plus some more through the lower port at the rear of the barrel? I guess I can imagine the flow from the draft, causing more pull through the primary screw, (through the burning coal bed) at the frt.
Are you sure the heat exchanger on the rear is reversible? It seems there's a slight taper at only one end. I haven't looked close yet.

franco b
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Joined: Wed. Nov. 05, 2008 5:11 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea
Location: Kent CT

Post By: franco b » Sun. Feb. 05, 2017 8:23 pm

joeq wrote:Are you sure the heat exchanger on the rear is reversible? It seems there's a slight taper at only one end. I haven't looked close yet.


I have only read that it is reversible, never saw it done.

The lower exhaust port is always negative so no primary air there.

There is another port just above the front grill on the inside of the barrel that conducts primary air through the front grill to the top, which is why it is important to get coal above that point to prevent or lessen the bypass.

Georgelap
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: Godin 3720A, Buderus Juno
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Other Heating: Oscar- oil boiler
Location: Nafpaktos- Greece

Post By: Georgelap » Mon. Feb. 06, 2017 5:49 pm

Joe, I have to tell you that you bought a great stove! Remember that these small pieces of art need good quality coal to work properly. :!:

How easy it is to find new spare parts for Godins in USA?

The last three years I heat up my house with one of these. It is 1200sqft, good insulated and I burn only about one ton yearly.

I will be happy to help you solve any problem you have!

Sorry for my poor English ;)
George

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scalabro
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Posts: 3345
Joined: Wed. Oct. 03, 2012 9:53 am
Baseburners & Antiques: 2 Crawford 40's, PP Stewart No. 14, Abendroth Bros "Record 40"
Coal Size/Type: Stove / Anthracite.
Other Heating: Oil fired, forced hot air.
Location: Western Massachusetts

Post By: scalabro » Mon. Feb. 06, 2017 5:54 pm

Where in Greece do you live George?

Ooopps ! Never mind I read your profile :oops:


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joeq
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Posts: 4765
Joined: Sat. Feb. 11, 2012 11:53 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired
Location: Northern CT

Post By: joeq » Mon. Feb. 06, 2017 7:12 pm

Georgelap wrote:Joe, I have to tell you that you bought a great stove! Remember that these small pieces of art need good quality coal to work properly. :!:

How easy it is to find new spare parts for Godins in USA?

The last three years I heat up my house with one of these. It is 1200sqft, good insulated and I burn only about one ton yearly.

I will be happy to help you solve any problem you have!

Sorry for my poor English ;)
George
George, there are stoves around relatively inexpensive, but you need to buy the whole thing. The guy I got mine from (as I mentioned), has another for $100. It looks OK too. But because of the weight, I think shipping to you wouldn't make it feasible.
(And once again, you don't need to apologize for your English. It's better than a lot of Americans we see on the forums. :D)

Georgelap
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Posts: 100
Joined: Sat. Oct. 11, 2014 10:04 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Godin 3720A, Buderus Juno
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Other Heating: Oscar- oil boiler
Location: Nafpaktos- Greece

Post By: Georgelap » Wed. Feb. 08, 2017 10:00 am

I forgot to make you know this:

The rear pipe system of the Godin helps to "connect" the red hot coals (bottom hole) with the flamable gases produced from the top of the coal batch. This system ignites the gases immediately after the coal become hot and red at the bottom pipe hole.

franco b
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Posts: 9245
Joined: Wed. Nov. 05, 2008 5:11 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea
Location: Kent CT

Post By: franco b » Wed. Feb. 08, 2017 11:19 am

Georgelap wrote:I forgot to make you know this:

The rear pipe system of the Godin helps to "connect" the red hot coals (bottom hole) with the flamable gases produced from the top of the coal batch. This system ignites the gases immediately after the coal become hot and red at the bottom pipe hole.
I had never considered that function. Thank you for that.

Georgelap
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Posts: 100
Joined: Sat. Oct. 11, 2014 10:04 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Godin 3720A, Buderus Juno
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Other Heating: Oscar- oil boiler
Location: Nafpaktos- Greece

Post By: Georgelap » Wed. Feb. 08, 2017 12:18 pm

franco b wrote:
Georgelap wrote:I forgot to make you know this:

The rear pipe system of the Godin helps to "connect" the red hot coals (bottom hole) with the flamable gases produced from the top of the coal batch. This system ignites the gases immediately after the coal become hot and red at the bottom pipe hole.
I had never considered that function. Thank you for that.
Trust me, am an engineer. :D

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joeq
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Posts: 4765
Joined: Sat. Feb. 11, 2012 11:53 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired
Location: Northern CT

Post By: joeq » Wed. Feb. 08, 2017 6:42 pm

Today, I moved the Godin from my truck bed, to my shed. "MAN!" that little thing is heavy. If it ain't 125, it's not a pound. As small as it is, I thought maybe 80lbs tops. That barrel must be 1/4" cast iron.
Don't even know the model number or year is yet.

Georgelap
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Posts: 100
Joined: Sat. Oct. 11, 2014 10:04 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Godin 3720A, Buderus Juno
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Other Heating: Oscar- oil boiler
Location: Nafpaktos- Greece

Post By: Georgelap » Wed. Feb. 08, 2017 7:14 pm

It is realy heavy joe!
Mine weights exactly 70kg.
I cant wait to see more photos about the restoration hohoho :D

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joeq
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Posts: 4765
Joined: Sat. Feb. 11, 2012 11:53 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired
Location: Northern CT

Post By: joeq » Wed. Feb. 08, 2017 7:28 pm

70 Kilos Geo!? I belive that equates to about 150lbs. Guess I won't be putting that back in my truck bed by myself anymore. :shock:


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