Surdiac Hopper Fed Coal Stove

Very popular in the 70's and 80's there is many brands of smaller hand fired coal stoves from many European countries. These can also date back to the turn of the last century. Imported stoves would include such brands as Franco Belge, Saey and Efel among many others.
FFFrozen
New Member
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue. Jan. 18, 2011 8:03 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: looking for two
Stove/Furnace Model: looking

Post Sat. Jan. 22, 2011 11:36 am

Alrighty! With this information in mind, we have found a used Alaska Stoker II in our area. Haven't seen it yet, but talked to the guy who says it is in nearly new condition. He says we will HAVE to have a power venter to direct vent. But, when I check around I see that alaska has the direct vent option too. Any idea about this? I know I'm in the wrong thread but many of the others are not active. Power venters are no bargain from what I can find. Thanks for your thoughs and guidance, I feel like I'm drinking from a fire hose!!

We are so cold that the idea of being in the mid-70's in our living space sounds like paradise!! It "feels like" 7 degress today near Valley Forge, PA. brrrrrrrrr


User avatar
grizzly2
Member
Posts: 842
Joined: Tue. Feb. 12, 2008 7:18 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 30 - 95
Coal Size/Type: pea and nut/ anthracite
Other Heating: Jotul #3 wood stove in garage. Oil backup in house. Electric backup in house.
Location: Whippleville, NY

Post Sat. Jan. 22, 2011 1:56 pm

Power venting is direct venting. In your situation you don't have a chimney available to vent your stove, so you will need to either install a chimney or direct vent with a exhaust fan (power venter). This is less expensive to install than a chimney in nearly all applications. The pipe is much smaller in diameter than a chimney, and does not have to go up, it can go straight through the wall. Howver, If the power vent motor quits you still have the problem of the stoker continuing to burn causing a CO hazzard (unless newer stoker installations have addressed this problem).
The only redeeming value of winter is that I can have a fire in my stove.

Karlg100
New Member
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun. Dec. 11, 2011 2:50 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Jotul/Serdiac
Stove/Furnace Model: 715

Post Mon. Dec. 12, 2011 12:15 pm

So I just want to say thanks to everyone on this forum and in this thread. I had an "ah ha!" moment late last night from this thread, and thought I would share my ramp up to learning how to heat with coal.

My wife and I bought this house 6 years ago and it came with a Surdiac 715, which mostly sat in the corner doing nothing. Half because I knew nothing about coal, and it had none of the required tools. Guessing previous owner lost them, took them, threw them out. This year our first slug of oil was >$600 to fill the tank, and looking at the cost per BTU, coal is obviously the way to go.

2 weeks ago I bought 2 bags of pea coal and started experimenting. Getting it lit was a tricky process to learn, but think I have the technique down now. My second problem, was I was able to keep it going for about 24 hrs, and then I would loose the fire.

I quickly figured from the posts and tip guides that you have to shake down the ashs. Well, my 715 has no "shaker knob" as some stoves do... And then noticed the holes in the front, and from some where else I read, you're supposed to use these to "shake down" the ashs. So taking a flat head screw driver, I shook the grates. That seemed to take care of the ashes, but then I've been banging my head as my fire dies within an hour. Trying different amounts of shaking vs letting the hopper empty, then shake or vice versa, my fire ALWAYS went out.

Then I realized from this post, you're supposed to "poke" the ashs down! NOT shake! (double face-palm) Anyone else trying to understand this stove, poke not shake! Poke not shake!

I don't have the poker that is supposed to fit thru the hole and reach the other side, and Woodmans doesn't carry it anymore for the 715. (I bought today the poker for the 714, hopefully it will fit) but in the mean time, I'm using a stainless steel kitchen skewer (to my wife's dismay... I'll buy her a new one). And so far it seems I'm getting the ash into the trays and the coal fire is no longer collapsing and contines to burn! Horray!

Next is to understand the damper device and where to set it.

Karlg100
New Member
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun. Dec. 11, 2011 2:50 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Jotul/Serdiac
Stove/Furnace Model: 715

Post Fri. Dec. 16, 2011 6:36 pm

So after a week of burning coal after figuring out how to poke properly, I'm pretty sure my thermostat is shot. The damper doesn't budge without manual intervention. Took it off the stove and tried booiling water while watching for movement, and nothing. I see Woodmans has them for ~$140...

Any suggestions on rebuilding vs replacing? I'm considering trying to drill out the rivets and take it apart. Looks like someone has bent the adjustment on the thermostat body about 30 degrees... The picture on woodmans is perfectly perpendicular to the body....And it's pretty gummed up inside as things don't move without a lot of resistance. (likely from being bent)

Anyone had any experience with malfunctioning thermostats on the surdiac?

franco b
Site Moderator
Posts: 8426
Joined: Wed. Nov. 05, 2008 5:11 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea
Location: Kent CT

Post Fri. Dec. 16, 2011 9:24 pm

Sorry no experience with those but I suspect it is a liquid filled bulb that expands with heat rather than a bi metal strip. Taking it apart to straighten things can't make it worse since it is not working now.

Karlg100
New Member
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun. Dec. 11, 2011 2:50 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Jotul/Serdiac
Stove/Furnace Model: 715

Post Mon. Dec. 19, 2011 8:49 pm

So I took apart the temperature probe device. Actually a pretty simply designed device. The other end of the temp,probe is a bellows that expands when the bulb gets hot enough. When the liquid condenses, and the bellows is supped to contract.

Turns out my probe is fine. You just need to use something hotter than boiling water to test. I used a small soldering touch which did the trick for me. if you use a propane touch or some other heat source, I recommend gently firing the bulb at low temperature, and slowly bring it up until the door begins to move, as to not damage it.

So my damper door was closing ok, but not opening again after the temp drop.

I had to take apart mine anyway to straitened out the adjustment gear shaft (where the cable attaches) that was bent. But rebuilding the mechanics didn't solve my problem.

Turns out, the internal compression spring doesn't have enough force to contract the bellows by itself. The German engineers who designed it only used the exact amount of force needed to simpy counter the force needed to make the bellows contract neutral. Giving the spring from damper arm enough to make it re-open.

So my fix turned out to be as simple as lubricating the hinge under the temp probe box which is connected to the damper door arm, on the back of the stove. (follow the cabe on the knob to the box) You don't even need to take anything off your stove to do this. For those with the same issue, lubricate with powdered graphite. (Powder only, no liquid suspension or gel) You should be able to get this from your local hardware store. (graphite is also useful for lubeing up all those hinges and metal-on-metal joints to get rid of the groans and moans when opening and closing your stove). DON'T use WD-40 or any other liquid lubricant as it will collect dust and likely cause a bigger mess later. (not to mention the fire hazard)

mtgdeadhead
New Member
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed. Oct. 03, 2012 9:23 am
Stove/Furnace Make: surdiac
Stove/Furnace Model: classic gotha 713
Location: GREENVILLE NH

Post Thu. Oct. 04, 2012 2:54 pm

Well congrats to all you guys and girls for helping me along with my gothiac 713. I am renting this house in N H and the stove was in the basement and I just covered it up with junk.. well unemployed temporarily I thought I would try this baby out.. I am origanally from maine and have had wood stoves my whole life. we also tried coal back in the late 79's but not as good as wood [then]..So anyway I figured out the front three spots poking not swiping,and the glass does not need to be tight, and the pans should be emptied often,..now here's my question..On the side of my stove abot mid way up the right side. theres a flatbar handle it moves but seems to do nothing???second theres anouther handle that slides in and out a little lower than this on but appears to do nothin..i looked inside and can see a little hooked end to this handle inside but its hooked to nothin???? and last pea coal does it go bad if its outside in a bin I found abot a 1/4 ton of coal outside kinda protected but not perfect will this be ok to keep burning?? MTG NH

User avatar
whistlenut
Member
Posts: 3549
Joined: Sat. Mar. 17, 2007 6:29 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: AA130's,260's, AHS130&260's,EFM900,GJ & V-Wert
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Franks,Itasca 415,Jensen, NYer 130,Van Wert
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Alaska, EFM, Keystoker, Yellow Flame
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska, Keystoker-2,Leisure Line
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Alaska, Gibraltar, Keystone,Vc Vigilant 2
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Ford, Jensen, NYer, Van Wert,
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwoods
Coal Size/Type: Barley, Buck, Rice ,Nut, Stove
Other Heating: Oil HWBB
Location: Central NH, Concord area

Post Thu. Oct. 04, 2012 10:25 pm

Coal does not go bad...ever...so you now have a partial supply to start the winter with. Enjoy! What part of the state do you live in?
"Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a 'piece of human solid waste' by the clean end." More true today....


User avatar
freetown fred
Member
Posts: 21410
Joined: Thu. Dec. 31, 2009 12:33 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut
Location: Freetown,NY 13803

Post Fri. Oct. 05, 2012 3:41 pm

MTG, post some pix of your stove, be easier to figure things out. Welcome to the FORUM
"A people that values it's privileges above it's principals, soon loses both"--Dwight D Eisenhower

User avatar
elleninpa
Member
Posts: 43
Joined: Sat. Nov. 15, 2008 4:52 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Surdiac but looking
Stove/Furnace Make: Surdiac but looking

Post Sun. Nov. 04, 2012 2:41 pm

some feedback from before, yes the woodsman's parts did have the correct grates for our surdiac, we ordered them, installed them, and have gotten more years out of our little sweetie pie stove, still a little underpowered for our house, but hey, it was free from a friend, so for the price of the grates and new glass every year or so, it's nice burning coal
desires a Glennwood 6 or 8

2DeXtreMe
Member
Posts: 60
Joined: Tue. Sep. 23, 2008 12:21 am
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska channing 3
Hand Fed Coal Stove: surdiac 715
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska & Surdiac
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing III & 715
Location: CT

Post Wed. Feb. 06, 2013 5:13 pm

Hi Everyone! I just recently got a lightly used Surdiac 715/515 model (The tag on the back doesn't specify which one.) The tag clearly states that a 6" pipe should be used. The exhaust outlet/flange measures 5.25" (inner diameter) and 5.50" (outer diameter).

Is there a 5.25"/5.5" X 6" increaser pipe for this stove? There was an obvious significant gap when I tested 5" pipes into the exhaust outlet.

Please let me know if there is such a part.

1) The built date was 1985
2) "Jotul" Portland, Maine is the parent company listed, however it was engraved "made in Belgium"
3) serial # 861256

User avatar
joeq
Member
Posts: 3976
Joined: Sat. Feb. 11, 2012 11:53 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: G111, Southard Robertson
Stove/Furnace Make: Thermopride
Stove/Furnace Model: oil fired
Location: Northern CT

Post Sun. Oct. 06, 2013 11:18 pm

Is anyone still reading or interested in this thread? I just found it.
I got coal in my Christmas stocking. (Yey!)
http://nepacrossroads.com/about36489.html

User avatar
2001Sierra
Member
Posts: 1844
Joined: Wed. May. 20, 2009 8:09 am
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90 Chimney vent
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Other Heating: Buderus Oil Boiler 3115-34
Stove/Furnace Model: Keystoker 90 Chimney Vent
Location: Wynantskill NY, 10 miles from Albany

Post Sun. Oct. 06, 2013 11:34 pm

My old Buderus hand fed was very close as well. I used to buy 6 inch and have it crimped to your dimensions, and later on did it myself with crimpers my friend had. I believe Malco makes crimpers that will let you make what you need.

User avatar
elleninpa
Member
Posts: 43
Joined: Sat. Nov. 15, 2008 4:52 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Surdiac but looking
Stove/Furnace Make: Surdiac but looking

Post Mon. Oct. 07, 2013 7:48 am

I am subscribed to this thread so I get notices when there is a post.

I was contacted by Old Time Stove Company and since my husband's recent retirement, we have decided to wait on using the inheritance money to get a Glennwood 6 or 8, and plan the basement re-do more thoroughly. So add me to the list of Glennwood wannabe's at least for a few more years. Maybe in my retirement in nine years I'll be able to afford it without any reservations.

Meanwhile, I am still going to use our trusty, well-known, well-cared for cute little Surdiac, underpowered though it is; we do have the backup wood burner. And as both daughters are now living outside the home, we don't need 80F bedrooms to keep them happy so we can tolerate the cooler house. Fewer colds and illnesses I am told.
desires a Glennwood 6 or 8

franco b
Site Moderator
Posts: 8426
Joined: Wed. Nov. 05, 2008 5:11 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea
Location: Kent CT

Post Mon. Oct. 07, 2013 12:03 pm

elleninpa wrote: Meanwhile, I am still going to use our trusty, well-known, well-cared for cute little Surdiac, underpowered though it is; we do have the backup wood burner. And as both daughters are now living outside the home, we don't need 80F bedrooms to keep them happy so we can tolerate the cooler house. Fewer colds and illnesses I am told.
A more practical solution would be to replace the wood stove with a Franco Belge which can be bought for a few hundred dollars and sometimes for a lot less. Operation is similar to the Surdiac but has a more convenient grate system that combines shaking and slicing. You would retain the benefits of hopper and thermostat. A simple sheet of metal with a bend at the top can be used to hang over the door opening to keep the glass clean when starting a fire with wood or when you wish to clean the glass. Two stoves give better heat distribution and only one is used in the warmer periods.


Post Reply

Return to “Imported Hand Fired Coal Stoves Using Anthracite”