Petit Godin 3271 Restore

Jaysmuts
New Member
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed. Jun. 13, 2018 8:31 am
Baseburners & Antiques: Godin 3726

Post By: Jaysmuts » Fri. Jun. 15, 2018 10:21 am

I am quite sure that those brands (Rutland, Hercules and Imperial) are not available here. I have seen them on the internet so I recognize some of the names. Do you think that it would make sense to ad sand to a smoother fireclay? Could that be a possible solution to strengthen a smooth fireclay?

Thanks for the advice regarding fuel sources. Unfortunately firewood and soft coal are the two most readily available fuel sources where I live.

franco b
Site Moderator
Posts: 9143
Joined: Wed. Nov. 05, 2008 5:11 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea
Location: Kent CT

Post By: franco b » Fri. Jun. 15, 2018 10:55 am

Try a small quantity of what is available and experiment as to what works best.

You can try the available coal, but i think you will prefer wood. Getting well seasoned wood can be a problem though. Speak to local people using either fuel for advice. Soft coal can vary quite a lot in its properties, so trying the local variety is worth a shot. Speak to the people at the coal yard.

The Godin needs to keep those interior bricks hot for best combustion.

Jaysmuts
New Member
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed. Jun. 13, 2018 8:31 am
Baseburners & Antiques: Godin 3726

Post By: Jaysmuts » Tue. Jun. 26, 2018 8:45 am

franco b wrote:
Fri. Jun. 15, 2018 10:55 am
Try a small quantity of what is available and experiment as to what works best.

You can try the available coal, but i think you will prefer wood. Getting well seasoned wood can be a problem though. Speak to local people using either fuel for advice. Soft coal can vary quite a lot in its properties, so trying the local variety is worth a shot. Speak to the people at the coal yard.

The Godin needs to keep those interior bricks hot for best combustion.
Franco, and anyone else who might have an opinion, I have another stupid question to ask. But first an update.

After removing all of the removable parts I reviewed all the parts and made a decision on which parts to replace and which to keep. I had to replace the crown (Iron ring that holds both lids), Outer smoke box, Cleaning plate (I just had a milled steel plate made), fire protection bar and fuel shield. I then placed all of the rusted parts in a tub filled with vinegar and waited 24hours. The rust came off with a toothbrush and I then finished all of the parts with a brass brush attached to my drill. Parts cleaned up real nice. Then my new parts arrived as well as the rope gaskets, glue for the rope, fire putty and a graphite stove polish (I think you might refer to it as Grate Polish?). The only thing that I still need to buy (that I am sure of) are the replacement bolts, nuts and screws.

Franco please don't get mad at me for asking this question, because we have kind of already covered this topic.
So at one time you mentioned that it would be better to use paint instead of polish after having cleaned the iron. The guy who supplied me with the parts suggested that I rather use the graphite paste as it would be absorbed by the metal and 'revive' the iron. So last night I sat on my behind and started polishing two parts to begin with. Halfway through the process I realized that all of my new parts (parts I ordered) are painted and not polished. In other words half of the Godin parts will be matt black and others will be polished cast iron. That won't do.

Okay, so here is the question. Is it possible to paint over the polished cast iron?
Do the polish/graphite paste really get absorbed by the iron or does it make a greasy layer on top of the metal? My logical conclusion is that in the event that the polish is not really 'absorbed' by the iron then the paint won't stick to the 'greasy' surface. Am I losing the plot here?

Also, what sort of paint would you recommend be used on these iron surfaces?

I appreciate any assistance and advice that you can offer.

Regards
P(i)eter


franco b
Site Moderator
Posts: 9143
Joined: Wed. Nov. 05, 2008 5:11 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea
Location: Kent CT

Post By: franco b » Tue. Jun. 26, 2018 11:41 am

You can use the stove polish over paint but not the other way around. The polish does not penetrate the iron. It will fall off a very hot surface such as a cast iron fire pot. The wax base evaporates when heated, leaving the graphite. I like Williams stove polish.

If there is no paint available specifically for stoves, then paint labeled for barbecue use and high heat will do. Usually 1200 degrees F. Rustoleum makes a decent product. The paintable form has more body than the rattle can.

What works well on the antique stoves is to paint the steel barrel and stove polish on the cast iron.

Jaysmuts
New Member
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed. Jun. 13, 2018 8:31 am
Baseburners & Antiques: Godin 3726

Post By: Jaysmuts » Wed. Jun. 27, 2018 7:29 am

franco b wrote:
Tue. Jun. 26, 2018 11:41 am
You can use the stove polish over paint but not the other way around. The polish does not penetrate the iron. It will fall off a very hot surface such as a cast iron fire pot. The wax base evaporates when heated, leaving the graphite. I like Williams stove polish.

If there is no paint available specifically for stoves, then paint labeled for barbecue use and high heat will do. Usually 1200 degrees F. Rustoleum makes a decent product. The paintable form has more body than the rattle can.

What works well on the antique stoves is to paint the steel barrel and stove polish on the cast iron.
Franco, I owe you a beer or three by now! Your advice is invaluable.

Okay, so... as I have already polished some of the Godin parts. My plan now is to go ahead and thoroughly wipe them off with a dry cloth to remove as much of the excess surface polish as possible. After that I plan on painting these parts with a high heat paint in order to give the stove a uniform look. I don't really have another plan.

Don't be too worried though because I have only polished five parts, namely:
A) The internal lid - I might not even paint as it will remain hidden under the more decorative outer lid),
B) The small ash tray that hangs outside (front) the stove - I will need to repaint this part as it is clearly visible on the stove,
C) The hooked tool used to open the lid when hot, will not paint this as it is not part of/attached to the stove,
D) The knob attached to the front of the stove that is used to regulate airflow - will have to paint this part,
E) The frontal ash grate - I am not going to paint this part as it is hidden inside of the stove. So a polish should be enough.

I think that Rustoleum is available in SA, so I might have a look into it.

franco b
Site Moderator
Posts: 9143
Joined: Wed. Nov. 05, 2008 5:11 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea
Location: Kent CT

Post By: franco b » Wed. Jun. 27, 2018 10:52 am

The polish will fall off that front grate, as it gets too hot for polish to keep sticking. Just leave it bare.

To remove polish,wet the cloth with paint thinner to start with. You have to remove the carrier of the graphite which is probably wax. You might even use hot water and soap as well. Dry well.

Any new cast iron should be heat cured by putting in oven and gradually raising temperature to 500 F over the course of an hour, and then let cool in oven to room temperature.


Jaysmuts
New Member
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed. Jun. 13, 2018 8:31 am
Baseburners & Antiques: Godin 3726

Post By: Jaysmuts » Thu. Jul. 19, 2018 8:43 am

Hey Franco

Thought I would just give a quick update on the status of my project. I was very ill for some time and had a couple of other holdups but am finally getting traction.

So, since my last update I went ahead and painted all of the cast iron parts with Rustoleum high heat paint. Then I sourced all the new replacement nuts, screws and bolts using stainless steel as far as possible. Now I am busy putting all of the parts together.

One thing that I have done with my build, that I don't think people usually do was to seal the exterior parts with ceramic rope.
before rope.jpg
with rope.jpg
I have done this with a 4mm ceramic rope and I used high-heat glue to stick them into place to make a gasket. I have done this for the exterior spigot, the round cleaning plate and the exterior smoke box. I tested the smoke box with a cigarette and it did not leak any smoke at the seams.

The other thing that I did was to build a rounded mold with cardboard in order to effectively build up a putty bridge over the thin metal area on the ring of the oven. By the time I took the photos I had already removed the cardboard.
Putty abridged.jpg
Smoke opening putty lining.jpg
I will most probably be finished by end of week.

franco b
Site Moderator
Posts: 9143
Joined: Wed. Nov. 05, 2008 5:11 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea
Location: Kent CT

Post By: franco b » Thu. Jul. 19, 2018 9:43 am

Coming along very well, good job.
Isn't it winter right now where you are?

Jaysmuts
New Member
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed. Jun. 13, 2018 8:31 am
Baseburners & Antiques: Godin 3726

Post By: Jaysmuts » Fri. Jul. 20, 2018 5:59 am

Hey Franco

Thank you. Could not have done such a good job without your help and this forum. I hope that this thread could be useful to someone else in future.
It certainly is winter here in the Southern Hemisphere. That being said, our idea of winter does not even come close to what you guys experience. When it gets really cold where I live temps are around 45°F but normal winter days are 58°F. Our homes aren't constructed to insulate as well as you guys in the colder parts of the states. So even if it does not get very cold, our homes feel very cold.

Post Reply

Return to “Imported Hand Fired Coal Stoves Using Anthracite”