60°C to 40°C after taking out ash

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Thyrantt
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Post by Thyrantt » Fri. Dec. 27, 2019 6:49 am

So as the subject says, the temperature drops from 60°C to 40°C (for 30%) right after I take out ash from teh bottom that has piled up and add coil on top? I'm not sure why is it happening and it also take is an hour or so to climb back up.

 
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freetown fred
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Post by freetown fred » Fri. Dec. 27, 2019 6:55 am

What stove-- where are ya located????????????????????

 
Thyrantt
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Post by Thyrantt » Fri. Dec. 27, 2019 7:02 am

freetown fred wrote:
Fri. Dec. 27, 2019 6:55 am
What stove-- where are ya located????????????????????
Sorry, I'm new to all this. Not a stove, a coal heater/boiler. I can provide some images if needed. Serbia.

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freetown fred
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Post by freetown fred » Fri. Dec. 27, 2019 10:19 am

Pix would help people with giving PROPER suggestions T

 
franco b
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Post by franco b » Fri. Dec. 27, 2019 12:16 pm

When adding new coal it first has to absorb heat from the burning coals to finally ignite. The temperature has to drop until the new coal ignites.

To speed up recovery time most give the fire maximum air for a period of time, while staying at the boiler to insure against over firing.

 
Thyrantt
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Post by Thyrantt » Sat. Dec. 28, 2019 9:23 am

freetown fred wrote:
Fri. Dec. 27, 2019 10:19 am
Pix would help people with giving PROPER suggestions T
Will remember next time to take a few for the future haha
franco b wrote:
Fri. Dec. 27, 2019 12:16 pm
When adding new coal it first has to absorb heat from the burning coals to finally ignite. The temperature has to drop until the new coal ignites.

To speed up recovery time most give the fire maximum air for a period of time, while staying at the boiler to insure against over firing.
Ok, will try it out like that. Thanks.

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franco b
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Post by franco b » Sat. Dec. 28, 2019 9:43 am

Also, after loading new coal, take a poker and make several passages through the new coal to red coal near the grate. This will speed up ignition of the gases given off by the new coal; as it heats. No puff back.

 
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BigBarney
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Post by BigBarney » Sun. Dec. 29, 2019 12:58 pm

Picture of stove needed for analysis..

Also what coal are you using?

BigBarney

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