bituminous coal

 
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CoalJockey
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Post by CoalJockey » Wed. Sep. 04, 2019 8:48 pm

Nothing personal of course MG, I just feel bituminous coal gets a very bad rap here at times.

 
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Post by McGiever » Wed. Sep. 04, 2019 9:30 pm

Same respect due to you sir, but you are but one of many peddlers of Bit coal. Others may not choose the better sources.

I have no experience burning coal from Halls.

Whom shall we leave to educate others to the properties of Bit?

 
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Post by CoalJockey » Thu. Sep. 05, 2019 2:21 am

I just want to make sure it’s properly represented is all. You are right though MG, some contains enough soot to clog the flues of the Titanic, that high-vol coal is not very suitable for anything other than an outdoor boiler.

Some has virtually none, you will sweep more fly ash out of the stack from hard coal than you will soot from the bituminous.

I now relinquish my tree stump. :)

 
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Post by Sylvesterd101 » Thu. Sep. 05, 2019 5:02 pm

well you guys are lucky that can get the bit for like 60 bucks a ton. i can get a ton of it for 285 which is not worth it for me so sticking with anthracite and will burn wood in the beginning and end of the season


 
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Post by ratherbeflying » Thu. Sep. 05, 2019 10:25 pm

CoalJockey wrote:
Wed. Sep. 04, 2019 8:46 pm
Here we go again. I respectfully beg to differ, you guys blow this waaaaayyyyyy out of proportion every time.

To begin with, get the right seam of coal for what you are trying to heat. I have coal on stock here that smokes very little more than anthracite and that smoke all comes when you do your firing for a few minutes until it burns off the volatile gasses. After that, it smokes less than a wood fire. Yes, I have some that smokes ALOT, and it makes a TON of heat. These guys are out in the mountains and have no neighbors for miles, smoke means someone is home.

Not everyone can afford anthracite. For those who cannot, it remains a very cost effective way to heat. To those who had great reviews on our bituminous coal, I greatly appreciate that. We try very hard.
very interesting... so i would just burn bit the same way i would burn anthracite? theres no differences? i just treat it the same? i would really be interested in getting a ton for shoulder months i just always thought it was different for some reason.

 
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Post by CoalJockey » Fri. Sep. 06, 2019 6:42 am

Well, not quite the same as far as firing methods. The beauty in anthracite shows in its ability to tossed on the fire, draft set, and walk away. Bituminous has a much steeper learning curve and is a little more labor intensive, really only when you do your firing though.

Example- Any soft coal will “coke” after a certain amount of time in the firebox. This is a thick layer of coal that is lightly held together. When you wish to add more coal you would need to get some kind of a fire poker and bust up this layer of coke; if you are doing it right it will fall apart just as easily as partially burned wood billets.

Soft coal contains volatile gasses that must be burnt off in the correct manor. When you are adding fresh coal be sure to leave a live flame poking through the fresh coal at all times to burn this gas off. If you “snuff out” the fire with coal, that gas will continue to build in the firebox and I likely don’t need to tell you what happens when that live flame finally pokes through. Think something like “a little charge” in there...

It sounds a lot worse than all of it really is. I grew up firing with the stuff so I suppose it looks a lot easier to me, but it is a very reliable heat when used properly. Many customers burn mostly wood and then just use several shovel-fulls at night for banking purposes to hold over until the morning.

Any way I can help let me know.

 
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Post by ratherbeflying » Fri. Sep. 06, 2019 9:42 am

CoalJockey wrote:
Fri. Sep. 06, 2019 6:42 am
Well, not quite the same as far as firing methods. The beauty in anthracite shows in its ability to tossed on the fire, draft set, and walk away. Bituminous has a much steeper learning curve and is a little more labor intensive, really only when you do your firing though.

Example- Any soft coal will “coke” after a certain amount of time in the firebox. This is a thick layer of coal that is lightly held together. When you wish to add more coal you would need to get some kind of a fire poker and bust up this layer of coke; if you are doing it right it will fall apart just as easily as partially burned wood billets.

Soft coal contains volatile gasses that must be burnt off in the correct manor. When you are adding fresh coal be sure to leave a live flame poking through the fresh coal at all times to burn this gas off. If you “snuff out” the fire with coal, that gas will continue to build in the firebox and I likely don’t need to tell you what happens when that live flame finally pokes through. Think something like “a little charge” in there...

It sounds a lot worse than all of it really is. I grew up firing with the stuff so I suppose it looks a lot easier to me, but it is a very reliable heat when used properly. Many customers burn mostly wood and then just use several shovel-fulls at night for banking purposes to hold over until the morning.

Any way I can help let me know.
thank you very much i would love to try it sometime! i love anthracite but i feel like i have to experience bit at least one time haha i just dont know where i would get it from? im in north jersey! like wayy at the top in wantage

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