ASME Boilers

Stoker Coal Boilers automatically feed the coal and have controls and pumps just like any conventions boiler. They are intended to be used as a primary heat and often have domestic hot water coils as an added bonus. They can be set up independently or in dual sytem with your existing oil/gas boiler. They can accommodate both hot water base board or steam plumbing.
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vtec350
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Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: KA-6
Location: Western Mass.
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Post Mon. May. 12, 2008 5:21 pm

Finally got some great news today from the building inspector regarding the ASME stamp needed here in Ma. I met with him this morning, asked him if there's anyway to instal the boiler legally, gave him all the info and asked him to call Jim at Keystoker. This guys usually known for being a hard ass to deal with and doing everything by the book. Two hours later he called me and said he spoke with Jim and said that the presure relief valve is AMSE listed and he would approve it. Going down tomorrow and ordering my KA-6 :D I know the AA and the EFM boilers are great boilers, but I don't have an extra $4K rite now. Thanks to you guys on here, I've learned a lot about coal and boilers in the last 2 weeks. Hopefully I don't have any problems with the install, but if I do, I now know where to go......
"In this country,
you gotta make the money first.
Then when you get the money,
you get the power."

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coaledsweat
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Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea
Location: Guilford, Connecticut

Post Mon. May. 12, 2008 5:24 pm

vtec350 wrote:This guys usually known for being a hard ass to deal with and doing everything by the book. Two hours later he called me and said he spoke with Jim and said that the presure relief valve is AMSE listed and he would approve it.
Lucky for you he is also an idiot. :roll:
Nothing is impossible for people who don't have to do it themselves.

dipep41
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Stove/Furnace Make: AHS
Stove/Furnace Model: S-260

Post Mon. May. 12, 2008 5:30 pm

What about the rest of the boiler?

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Flyer5
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Post Mon. May. 12, 2008 5:36 pm

coaledsweat wrote:
vtec350 wrote:This guys usually known for being a hard ass to deal with and doing everything by the book. Two hours later he called me and said he spoke with Jim and said that the presure relief valve is AMSE listed and he would approve it.
Lucky for you he is also an idiot. :roll:
I don't understand the reasoning for that statement ? Seems a little harsh considering he went out of the way and helped find a solution . Dave
http://www.leisurelinestove.com


You know when people say it was "better back in my day"?

They were right.

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coaledsweat
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Post Mon. May. 12, 2008 6:47 pm

Yes, I realize it is a little harsh. But he is accepting an ancillary parts approval when the code speaks to the device itself. I realize also that in this case he was one heck of a guy too. :) Don't take it so hard, every now and then, I'm an idiot too.
Nothing is impossible for people who don't have to do it themselves.

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vtec350
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Post Mon. May. 12, 2008 6:52 pm

Flyer5 wrote:
coaledsweat wrote: Lucky for you he is also an idiot. :roll:
I don't understand the reasoning for that statement ? Seems a little harsh considering he went out of the way and helped find a solution . Dave
The building Inspectors have the final say in any areas of the code book. I've even seen him make builders do More than the code requires, so it's up to his discreation to approve it or not, he spent the time to look into it. Insurance Co. already said as long as I have a signed inspection I'm good with them too.
"In this country,
you gotta make the money first.
Then when you get the money,
you get the power."

CapeCoaler
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Stoker Coal Boiler: want AA130
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine BS#4, Harman MKII, Hitzer 503,...
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Stove
Location: Cape Cod, MA

Post Mon. May. 12, 2008 9:28 pm

Glad to hear it worked out ok with the building inspector. I have found it is far easier to be upfront with them and end up with a mutually acceptable outcome then try to sneak it by and deal with it after the fact. They make the rules, for the most part; it is easier to work with them than against them.
I am not an engineer, train or otherwise!
I stay at a Holiday Inn at least once a year!
Most of all I do have common sense and a practical application of logic.
Oh, add humor, on the dry side, along with a wee bit 'o sarcasm.

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Freddy
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Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined
Location: Orrington, Maine

Post Mon. May. 12, 2008 11:28 pm

I woulsn't say the inspector was an idiot. I'd say he knows how to use common sense. The relief valve blows off at 20 PSI. No matter how the boiler was constructed, how much of an explosion can happen at 20 PSI?

What get's me, last I knew MA does not require a low water cut off. Maine does. Even if Maine didn't, I would have one. Especially if you have PEX tubing or any chance whatsoever of a freeze and pipe break. Without the low water cut off, if the system goes dry, it heats until meltdown, quite literally. Houses burn down because of a leaky pipe. The low water cutoff shuts the unit down if it runs dry..... actually, before it runs dry.
Orrington, Maine
Fred

"If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all".

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Richard S.
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Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite
Location: NEPA

Post Mon. May. 12, 2008 11:35 pm

Freddy wrote: how much of an explosion can happen at 20 PSI?
I'd imagine it's not much but wouldn't want to be around to test that theory. :P
"The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits."

- Albert Einstein

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Yanche
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Stoker Coal Boiler: Alternate Heating Systems S-130
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea
Location: Sykesville, Maryland

Post Mon. May. 12, 2008 11:59 pm

Freddy wrote:I woulsn't say the inspector was an idiot. I'd say he knows how to use common sense. The relief valve blows off at 20 PSI. No matter how the boiler was constructed, how much of an explosion can happen at 20 PSI?

What get's me, last I knew MA does not require a low water cut off. Maine does. Even if Maine didn't, I would have one. Especially if you have PEX tubing or any chance whatsoever of a freeze and pipe break. Without the low water cut off, if the system goes dry, it heats until meltdown, quite literally. Houses burn down because of a leaky pipe. The low water cutoff shuts the unit down if it runs dry..... actually, before it runs dry.
Mass. requires a low water cut off on all steam boilers and on water boilers of 200K BTU/hr or more.
Yanche
Alternate Heating Systems S-130
Stoker Boiler burning Anthracite Pea Coal

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Freddy
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Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
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Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined
Location: Orrington, Maine

Post Tue. May. 13, 2008 6:21 am

Richard S. wrote:
Freddy wrote: how much of an explosion can happen at 20 PSI?
I'd imagine it's not much but wouldn't want to be around to test that theory. :P
*giGgLe* You got that right.... After I posted I thought about it & ya know.... I wouldn't want to be around either.

Low water cut off's on 200K & larger? OK, a step in the right direction,, I wonder when they'll realize that leaves almost every home off the list. For anyone reading, they cost about $100 and are a fun electrical challange to install, but with one you get a higher level peace of mind.
Orrington, Maine
Fred

"If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all".

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coalkirk
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Stoker Coal Boiler: 1981 EFM DF520
Coal Size/Type: anthracite/rice coal
Location: Forest Hill MD

Post Tue. May. 13, 2008 6:54 am

Freddy wrote:I woulsn't say the inspector was an idiot. I'd say he knows how to use common sense. The relief valve blows off at 20 PSI. No matter how the boiler was constructed, how much of an explosion can happen at 20 PSI?

What get's me, last I knew MA does not require a low water cut off. Maine does. Even if Maine didn't, I would have one. Especially if you have PEX tubing or any chance whatsoever of a freeze and pipe break. Without the low water cut off, if the system goes dry, it heats until meltdown, quite literally. Houses burn down because of a leaky pipe. The low water cutoff shuts the unit down if it runs dry..... actually, before it runs dry.
Pressure relief valves blow off at 30 psi unless MA requires something different tha the rest of the country.
You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life. Winston Churchill

"I would rather have a German division in front of me than a French one behind me." —General George S. Patton

Burning rice coal in a 1981 EFM DF520, nut coal in a hand fired Jotul 507.

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Freddy
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Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined
Location: Orrington, Maine

Post Tue. May. 13, 2008 7:41 am

coalkirk wrote:
Pressure relief valves blow off at 30 psi unless MA requires something different tha the rest of the country.
Slap me! :doh: Of course, Yes, 30 PSI for hot water boilers, 150 PSI for hot water tanks.

(Now instead of standing 20 feet away when I test blow a boiler, I have to stand 30! )
Orrington, Maine
Fred

"If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all".

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coalkirk
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Stoker Coal Boiler: 1981 EFM DF520
Coal Size/Type: anthracite/rice coal
Location: Forest Hill MD

Post Tue. May. 13, 2008 7:48 am

Freddy wrote:
coalkirk wrote:
Slap me! :doh: Of course, Yes, 30 PSI for hot water boilers, 150 PSI for hot water tanks.

(Now instead of standing 20 feet away when I test blow a boiler, I have to stand 30! )
If by hot water tanks you mean water heaters, they're 30 psi also. Nothing in a home should have 150 psi. :blowup: :blowup:
You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life. Winston Churchill

"I would rather have a German division in front of me than a French one behind me." —General George S. Patton

Burning rice coal in a 1981 EFM DF520, nut coal in a hand fired Jotul 507.

CapeCoaler
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Joined: Sun. Feb. 10, 2008 3:48 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: want AA130
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Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Stove
Location: Cape Cod, MA

Post Tue. May. 13, 2008 7:57 am

Ask anyone who worked/works with steam if they want to be near anything that blows.
The problem begins when the relief valve fails to open.
The pressure will then rise till the next “relief valve” opens, usually with very destructive force.
Myth Busters did a show where they removed the relief valve and cooked the water heater till it blew, at 300 psi, turned it into a missile that took a very long time to return to earth.
It makes sense to allow the boiler to be installed with the stamped relief valve because water heaters use 40 -80 psi working pressure and, I believe, do not require the stamp on the vessel.
The part that everyone is relying on to work is the pressure relief valve. If it does its job the boiler is usually under 20 psi
I am not an engineer, train or otherwise!
I stay at a Holiday Inn at least once a year!
Most of all I do have common sense and a practical application of logic.
Oh, add humor, on the dry side, along with a wee bit 'o sarcasm.

Visit Alternate Heating Sytems

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