Plastic Plumbing

Stoker Coal Boilers automatically feed the coal and have controls and pumps just like any conventions boiler. They are intended to be used as a primary heat and often have domestic hot water coils as an added bonus. They can be set up independently or in dual sytem with your existing oil/gas boiler. They can accommodate both hot water base board or steam plumbing.
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Ed.A
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Posts: 1638
Joined: Thu. Aug. 30, 2007 7:27 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Alaska Channing III/ '94 Stoker II
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Location: Canterbury Ct.

Post Fri. Dec. 28, 2007 10:25 pm

Wood'nCoal wrote:I would, just to be safe. It will also give you a chance to inspect the bare ends of the line, and be sure the lugs are tight.
Just make sure to shut the power off first! :oops2:

Really? I like working with hot circuits better because it makes my heart beat faster. :lol: Seriously, thanks for the advice, I'll delve into this.....after my Rotties stop trying to kill each other....I'm not Kidding.

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e.alleg
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Posts: 1285
Joined: Fri. Feb. 16, 2007 10:31 am
Stove/Furnace Make: EFM
Stove/Furnace Model: 520
Location: western ny

Post Sun. Dec. 30, 2007 3:28 pm

THEORETICALLY You can tighten the lugs one at a time with the power on, just make sure that you have rubber soles on and an insulated screwdriver and that you aren't touching anything. Keep one hand in your pocket. I had my main circuit breaker changed and the inspector came to inspect it because we had to pull the meter. He didn't shut off anything and tightened the main lugs to make sure the electrician did his job. :shock:
Burning coal is definitely worth the extra work involved.
"Good enough" is not good enough.

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CoalHeat
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Posts: 8327
Joined: Sat. Feb. 10, 2007 9:48 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Baseburners & Antiques: Sears Signal Oak 15 & Andes Kitchen Range
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert
Location: Stillwater, New Jersey

Post Sun. Dec. 30, 2007 4:58 pm

e.alleg wrote:THEORETICALLY You can tighten the lugs one at a time with the power on, just make sure that you have rubber soles on and an insulated screwdriver and that you aren't touching anything. Keep one hand in your pocket. I had my main circuit breaker changed and the inspector came to inspect it because we had to pull the meter. He didn't shut off anything and tightened the main lugs to make sure the electrician did his job. :shock:


In theory you can. Would I, no. I have done lots of wiring in breaker boxes with the power on, that doesn't bother me. The breakers and the main are between me and the service entrance. The thought of that rather high amperage potential available from the service entrance cable is enough to make me pull the meter. :?
Heating a circa 1832 farmhouse with a Harman Magnafire Mark I & a 1959 EFM 350 (heating DHW).
100% Oil Free!
"It's what we learn after we think we know it all that counts."

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Flyer5
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Joined: Sun. Oct. 21, 2007 4:23 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL110
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Pioneer
Location: Montrose PA
Contact:

Post Sun. Dec. 30, 2007 5:54 pm

e.alleg wrote:THEORETICALLY You can tighten the lugs one at a time with the power on, just make sure that you have rubber soles on and an insulated screwdriver and that you aren't touching anything. Keep one hand in your pocket. I had my main circuit breaker changed and the inspector came to inspect it because we had to pull the meter. He didn't shut off anything and tightened the main lugs to make sure the electrician did his job. :shock:


That is a very stupid practice . I wouldn't even do it with the lower circuit breakers .And I mess with electricity all day . It takes less than 0.5 amps to be fatal . Not worth the risk . The rubber soles on shoes do not meen they are electrially insulated . Chances are the way you describe you may get away with it most times . But is it worth the risk ? Dave
http://www.leisurelinestove.com


You know when people say it was "better back in my day"?

They were right.

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coaledsweat
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Posts: 9822
Joined: Fri. Oct. 27, 2006 2:05 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea
Location: Guilford, Connecticut

Post Sun. Dec. 30, 2007 6:12 pm

Flyer5 wrote:is it worth the risk ?


Its never worth it. Sometimes you have to do some things live, make them as few and far between as possible. Its no different than Russian roulette.
Nothing is impossible for people who don't have to do it themselves.

lincolnmania
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Posts: 828
Joined: Fri. Jan. 26, 2007 9:55 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: efm af-150 1982
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: alaska kodiak stoker 1986
Hand Fed Coal Stove: warm morning 1980 kenmore
Location: newtown/zerbe pa
Contact:

Post Sun. Dec. 30, 2007 6:37 pm

i've been thinking of heating my hot water with the alaska, by using a ac condensor and a circulating pump and my 50 gallon single element electric water heater.......what tempature can cpvc handle? I always use the good metal to cpvc connectors....cause plastic threads just don't work.

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coaledsweat
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Posts: 9822
Joined: Fri. Oct. 27, 2006 2:05 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea
Location: Guilford, Connecticut

Post Sun. Dec. 30, 2007 6:45 pm

PVC is 140* and CPVC goes as high as 220*.
Nothing is impossible for people who don't have to do it themselves.

lincolnmania
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Posts: 828
Joined: Fri. Jan. 26, 2007 9:55 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: efm af-150 1982
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: alaska kodiak stoker 1986
Hand Fed Coal Stove: warm morning 1980 kenmore
Location: newtown/zerbe pa
Contact:

Post Sun. Dec. 30, 2007 7:15 pm

ok so the cpvc would be fine then? I only use cpvc for hot water.....copper is just too expensive these days....i'm sure i'm making some pipefitters shreik lol

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coaledsweat
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Posts: 9822
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Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea
Location: Guilford, Connecticut

Post Sun. Dec. 30, 2007 7:38 pm

I hope Yanche chimes in here, I think he has done this. I get the willies thinking about it from my experiences in an industrial setting.
Nothing is impossible for people who don't have to do it themselves.

lincolnmania
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Posts: 828
Joined: Fri. Jan. 26, 2007 9:55 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: efm af-150 1982
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: alaska kodiak stoker 1986
Hand Fed Coal Stove: warm morning 1980 kenmore
Location: newtown/zerbe pa
Contact:

Post Sun. Dec. 30, 2007 7:56 pm

i installed cpvc in my parents house around 1990......the copper and galvanized pipe were corroded almost shut when I ripped out all the old plumbing......they have hard water, and my parents and I hate water softeners......hard water here too, we ran all plastic pipe here also as the copper was rotted away......in an industrial setting plastic pipe is a headache yes I know..........years ago I was a maintenance man at the morgantown pa holiday inn..........they had a closed loop system with a heat pump in every room.........the rooms supply was pvc pipe with plastic threaded pieces going to brass ball valves to shut off each unit so you could remove it and service it......more than once the threads gave out and there was water everywhere........i'm a poor auto mechanic.....i cant afford copper either lol

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Yanche
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Posts: 3032
Joined: Fri. Dec. 23, 2005 12:45 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Alternate Heating Systems S-130
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea
Location: Sykesville, Maryland

Post Sun. Dec. 30, 2007 8:42 pm

coaledsweat wrote:I hope Yanche chimes in here, I think he has done this. I get the willies thinking about it from my experiences in an industrial setting.
I'm not sure what the question is but I've had good luck with CPVC piping for hot and cold water lines in residential use. The important detail is the transition from metal to CPVC. Always make the CPVC a threaded MALE fitting into the FEMALE metal fitting and use Silcone RTV instead of pipe dope. The plastic expands more than the metal with temperature increase so you get a joint that naturally tightens as the temperature increases. I've also had good luck with CPVC ball valves and poor luck with CPVC gate valves. Be sure to use the pre-cleaner solvent and the cement made just for CPVC, not the general purpose stuff. Cut your pipe at right angles using a miter box, or tubing cutter and de-burr both the OD and ID. Look at how the pipe goes into a fitting and notice how important it is to have a square cut. You want glue down at that interface where the pipe will bottom out. Glue ball valves when they are open and be careful not to use so much glue and glue the ball in place.
Yanche
Alternate Heating Systems S-130
Stoker Boiler burning Anthracite Pea Coal

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CoalHeat
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Posts: 8327
Joined: Sat. Feb. 10, 2007 9:48 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Baseburners & Antiques: Sears Signal Oak 15 & Andes Kitchen Range
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert
Location: Stillwater, New Jersey

Post Sun. Dec. 30, 2007 9:17 pm

Flyer5 wrote:
e.alleg wrote:THEORETICALLY You can tighten the lugs one at a time with the power on, just make sure that you have rubber soles on and an insulated screwdriver and that you aren't touching anything. Keep one hand in your pocket. I had my main circuit breaker changed and the inspector came to inspect it because we had to pull the meter. He didn't shut off anything and tightened the main lugs to make sure the electrician did his job. :shock:


That is a very stupid practice . I wouldn't even do it with the lower circuit breakers .And I mess with electricity all day . It takes less than 0.5 amps to be fatal . Not worth the risk . The rubber soles on shoes do not meen they are electrially insulated . Chances are the way you describe you may get away with it most times . But is it worth the risk ? Dave


Exactly. Just because the soles of your shoes are rubber doesn't mean they are dielectric. Also, tools have to be very well insulated, and if you are working standing on dirt or concrete you need to use a dielectric rubber mat. I once helped an electrician do a live splice from a new service entrance to the lines from the pole. We spent more time wrapping the tools in about a mile of electrical tape then doing the actual work.
Heating a circa 1832 farmhouse with a Harman Magnafire Mark I & a 1959 EFM 350 (heating DHW).
100% Oil Free!
"It's what we learn after we think we know it all that counts."

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CoalHeat
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Posts: 8327
Joined: Sat. Feb. 10, 2007 9:48 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Baseburners & Antiques: Sears Signal Oak 15 & Andes Kitchen Range
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert
Location: Stillwater, New Jersey

Post Sun. Dec. 30, 2007 9:27 pm

lincolnmania wrote:ok so the cpvc would be fine then? I only use cpvc for hot water.....copper is just too expensive these days....i'm sure i'm making some pipefitters shreik lol


I guess I'm just "old school". I prefer copper.
Where I live the water is very hard with some iron content. I finally was able to afford a water softener a few years ago. It's made a world of difference, esp. with laundry, the dishwasher, I can wash my car or truck without it being covered in lime stains (using towels to dry them made it worse-the laundered towels were loaded with lime from the water). Cleaning the bathtub was a chore, first hot water and phosphoric acid to remove the lime, then scrubbing. I actually had the toilet clog up with calcium carbonate! It wouldn't flush properly. A few hours with hot water and acid cleared it up. All the outlets under the rim were clogged.
Many industrial settings with hard water soften all or just the hot water, esp. commercial laundries. And a shower with very hard water really hurts, you have to just let the water dribble out of the shower head! :)
So what's wrong with water softeners?
Heating a circa 1832 farmhouse with a Harman Magnafire Mark I & a 1959 EFM 350 (heating DHW).
100% Oil Free!
"It's what we learn after we think we know it all that counts."

lincolnmania
Member
Posts: 828
Joined: Fri. Jan. 26, 2007 9:55 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: efm af-150 1982
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: alaska kodiak stoker 1986
Hand Fed Coal Stove: warm morning 1980 kenmore
Location: newtown/zerbe pa
Contact:

Post Sun. Dec. 30, 2007 9:56 pm

you cant get the soap off of you in the shower.....my grandparents had a water softener I hated it! hard water for teh win!
purple power works great for cleaning the bathroom.....removes all the hard water stains

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av8r
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Posts: 1163
Joined: Thu. Dec. 06, 2007 12:07 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Leisure Line Hearth with twin turbos (sounds like it)
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Hearth model with twin turbos
Location: Near Owego, NY

Post Sun. Dec. 30, 2007 10:31 pm

lincolnmania wrote:you cant get the soap off of you in the shower.....my grandparents had a water softener I hated it! hard water for teh win!
purple power works great for cleaning the bathroom.....removes all the hard water stains

The soap does come off, it just feels (at first) like it's still there. Once you get used to soft water, you'll hate the feeling of hard water. Use much less detergents for everything also. Our front loader washer uses less than 2 tablespoons of detergent for a huge load of oversize towels. A big jug of detergent lasts nearly a year.
"Fools you are. To say you learn by your experience. I prefer to profit by others' mistakes and avoid the price of my own."

- Otto von Bismarck

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