Wood in a 1557 Hot Blast, Work Good???

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DOUG
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Posts: 904
Joined: Wed. Jul. 09, 2008 8:49 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: CHUBBY, D.S.MACHINE BOILER
Stove/Furnace Model: CLAYTON 1600
Location: PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA

Post Tue. Sep. 01, 2009 7:02 pm

Yes and welcome to forum. Here is a post you may be interested in. Clayton Furnace Fired on Wood I think that you will be happy with your prospective choice of hand fired furnace. How long you get it to burn really is subjective to a lot of factors. I can easily get 10-12 hour burns, but only with a barometric draft regulator in my stovepipe. There are some different schools of thought on its use, but NFPA recommends the use of them and if you maintain a clean chimney, you will see the long efficient burn times. :)

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North Candlewood
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Posts: 239
Joined: Sun. Dec. 09, 2007 9:00 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Eshland S-130
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Keystoker A 120
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Clayton 1602
Baseburners & Antiques: Princess Atlantic Cookstove
Coal Size/Type: Nut Rice
Location: Ct

Post Tue. Sep. 01, 2009 10:35 pm

Well you heard it here first!
I'm in the process of the coal burning equipment change operation. I really expect it to be painless! :D
So to this thread, Long burn times in my 1600 on wood were related to a good bed of coals and then packing the box with all shapes and sizes. The baro is also key to this and I have also done it without it. Truthfully once I learned about the art of controling draft with the baro I had better burns in both coal and wood. Get a manometer and learn with the right tools. It's cheap insurance and what you will save in fuel will pay for it the first month or less. I love the beast. So if your interested in a used 1600 delivery possible this is the first for that as well.
Hate to see it go!
Gone Stoker Boiler

Dande
New Member
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue. Sep. 01, 2009 5:38 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: united states stove company
Stove/Furnace Model: 1557m

Post Sun. Sep. 06, 2009 10:35 am

Thanks guys. Is it safe to load the wood above the top edge of the fire brick? Seems like I might want to ad a row of firebrick on top of the ones that come in the stove. Our electric bill keeps going up here in VA so I might see about heating my water with the stove/furnace too. Right now I'll use about 2 cords of wood each winter to heat a 1500's.f. house, might as well heat my water while I'm at it.


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DOUG
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Posts: 904
Joined: Wed. Jul. 09, 2008 8:49 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: CHUBBY, D.S.MACHINE BOILER
Stove/Furnace Model: CLAYTON 1600
Location: PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA

Post Sun. Sep. 06, 2009 10:57 am

Yes! Go ahead and stuff that bad boy until you can't fit another piece of wood into it. Adding another row of firebricks on top of the other ones, I don't see much advantage to that when burning wood. But, for burning coal, It will allow for a deeper fire bed for the coal to have a nicer, longer, and more even burning.

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Art
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Posts: 7
Joined: Sun. Feb. 17, 2013 1:14 pm
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Other Heating: Climate Master 4T Geothermal heat pump, closed loop
Stove/Furnace Make: Clayton
Stove/Furnace Model: 1602M
Location: Marion, Mich.

Post Tue. Feb. 04, 2014 7:51 am

Hello all, I really appreciate all the insight from the experiences of everyone here, this is great!

First time post-er, here. I have a Clayton 1602M that I'm using wood in. I'm picking up through reading various posts that there is an importance placed on the use of the feed door spin draft vs the ash door spin draft to control burning. What is the difference? When should I use one vs the other? Or use them at least a little together? I have found that using the ash door spin draft I get quicker, more satisfying results, but I'm also burning out during the night and usually only getting 4 hours tops when I completely fill the stove. First winter ussing this furnace and stilll geetting used to it. I am using primarily red oak that I feel is too wet really, so I typically have to draft it pretty heavily to keep good burn. I'm really concerned about creosote build up so susequenlty I really hesitate to completely button down the stove for night.

I know I've jumped around a bit on this post but really apprecite ssome experienced advise!
Thankks, Art

oilman
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Posts: 214
Joined: Sat. Feb. 04, 2006 6:19 pm
Location: Central New York

Post Wed. Feb. 05, 2014 3:46 pm

I don't think you are far off.........wood likes air over the top to burn gases while coal needs it all from the bottom.

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