Wanting to go off grid...by water power

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Hoytman
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Post by Hoytman » Wed. Sep. 12, 2018 11:42 am

I live where wind power isn't an option, the electric goes off frequently because of the amount of trees near our electric lines, and down between 3 hills where the garden produce stretches for light which makes full solar power not an option, though it's still a viable option for a minor amount of power.

Water power is the best way for me to generate power. I have a creek behind my house that's about 12'-15' wide. Not only does the creek have good fall to it, and 3/4 of the year decent flow, but I also have a waterfall with about a 3' drop to it.

I was thinking about trying to capture some of the water's power to generate most of my electricity needs via perhaps a water wheel and generator. I haven't really done much research yet and was wondering if y'all had any thoughts or previous experience with this type of thing.

 
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Freddy
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Post by Freddy » Wed. Sep. 12, 2018 11:51 am

I love the idea, but, check with your state.... here in Maine you'd play hell to get a permit to allow you to do it. Depending on your local, you may not be able to afford the studies to see which fishies, salamanders, or frogs you'll disturb.

 
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tsb
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Post by tsb » Wed. Sep. 12, 2018 11:57 am

I worked with this company for years when I was in the fabricating business. I don't know if they are still around, but they do have a web site. We built the stainless scroll bodies for the low head turbines. I think they are building all their own bodies now. They are perfect for small stream applications. Trash and flooding are the big problems with hydro power.

http://www.waterturbine.com

 
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Post by Rob R. » Wed. Sep. 12, 2018 12:50 pm

The man with all the answers did this in Chateaguay NY and wrote a book about it. I was fortunate to get a tour before he passed away, but sadly I do not have his book. I will see if his son has any info on it.

The home was about 3000 sq. Ft and entirely powered by a home built hydro system, including electric heat.

 
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Post by Qtown1835 » Wed. Sep. 12, 2018 2:54 pm

I saw this a while back.

https://waterotor.com/


 
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Post by lzaharis » Wed. Sep. 12, 2018 9:55 pm

Hoytman wrote:
Wed. Sep. 12, 2018 11:42 am
I live where wind power isn't an option, the electric goes off frequently because of the amount of trees near our electric lines, and down between 3 hills where the garden produce stretches for light which makes full solar power not an option, though it's still a viable option for a minor amount of power.

Water power is the best way for me to generate power. I have a creek behind my house that's about 12'-15' wide. Not only does the creek have good fall to it, and 3/4 of the year decent flow, but I also have a waterfall with about a 3' drop to it.

I was thinking about trying to capture some of the water's power to generate most of my electricity needs via perhaps a water wheel and generator. I haven't really done much research yet and was wondering if y'all had any thoughts or previous experience with this type of thing.
===================================================================================================



It sounds like your a good candidate for a water ram to push the water up hill to an overshot wheel operating a belt driven 110 volt generator with V belts to charge a bank of locomotive batteries for electric power.

If you can afford locomotive batteries to feed your electric needs over a 24 hour period with low voltage lighting and propane appliances like a refrigerator/freezer and washing machine you will be ahead of the game.

A 110 volt steam powered washer dryer would be an option as you can use the same machine for both tasks.

 
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Post by lsayre » Thu. Sep. 13, 2018 4:15 am

Qtown1835 wrote:
Wed. Sep. 12, 2018 2:54 pm
I saw this a while back.

https://waterotor.com/
The 1KW model is anticipated to cost ~ $5,000 when available. You can't do much with 1KW. I would need a 10KW model.

 
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Post by Qtown1835 » Thu. Sep. 13, 2018 9:20 am

lsayre wrote:
Thu. Sep. 13, 2018 4:15 am
The 1KW model is anticipated to cost ~ $5,000 when available. You can't do much with 1KW. I would need a 10KW model.
Better put on your thinking cap and get inventing.

 
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Post by McGiever » Thu. Sep. 13, 2018 10:36 am

What is 30 days worth of a load at 10Kw, and do you use that much electricity per 30 days already now?

Operating 24/7 at 10Kw could power a few more than just one households, maybe???
Last edited by McGiever on Thu. Sep. 13, 2018 10:46 am, edited 1 time in total.

 
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lsayre
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Post by lsayre » Thu. Sep. 13, 2018 10:44 am

Perhaps I need to rethink the math. In the summer I use about 6-8 KWH per day, and in the winter as much as 10-12 KWH per day.

If the waterotor can deliver 1KW per hour (wherein the tricky part is that they do not indicate what steady MPH of river water flow that requires) then over 24 hours it would generate 24 KWH, or twice what I need in the winter and roughly three times what I need in the summer.

They say it takes a 1.5 to 2 MPH flow just to keep it turning, and at that juncture the output is probably right near zero KW per hour.


 
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McGiever
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Post by McGiever » Thu. Sep. 13, 2018 10:57 am

Larry, your original point is well taken on that the 1000 watt is not a whole lot for a whole house, I just wanted to keep it 'real' as for what size may or might really be needed to work.

 
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lsayre
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Post by lsayre » Thu. Sep. 13, 2018 11:06 am

McGiever wrote:
Thu. Sep. 13, 2018 10:57 am
Larry, your original point is well taken on that the 1000 watt is not a whole lot for a whole house, I just wanted to keep it 'real' as for what size may or might really work.
With sufficient battery storage to capture it, a steady state output of 1,000 Watts per hour adds up to 24,000 Watts per day. With two units outputting that much, and given sufficient battery storage plus a huge inverter, I might even be able to run the whole house A/C unit. But it probably takes a stream moving past and through it at a reliable ~20 MPH to deliver 1,000 Watts every hour. I don't even have a creek, let alone a swiftly flowing river on my land. This is a solution that very few will ever be able to utilize.

 
Hoytman
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Post by Hoytman » Thu. Sep. 13, 2018 11:35 am

I already have some parts to build a ram pump to pump water uphill...1 1/2" brass spring check valves. Swing check valves are better, but spring checks will work and I bought enough brass spring checks to build 4 rams...I think...maybe it was 3 rams. However, at times I have enough flow to drive rams from 6" to probably 10" rams...but who could afford to build them. The brass checks I bought were $30 each, but I only give about $5 for each...so I bought all they had. So, my biggest expense for the rams will be the galvanized metal drive pipes and the pressure gauges.

I doubt if these would supply enough water to power a wheel enough for my electric needs, but it's a start. I can use them elsewhere for sure...like to supply water tanks for livestock and cistern water for the gardens.

 
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Post by BigBarney » Fri. Sep. 14, 2018 2:07 pm

When I looked at the charts you need a huge flow of water and a big

drop to generate much power . The 640 needs 10' of head and 851gpm

to get 1010 watts ,about 51,000 gph.

The biggest problem with these are trash in the stream,especially in the

fall with leaves and twigs clogging up the intake.

The batteries would also add costs , but maybe you could store the excess

in your EV which would enable free fuel and just use the power co as your

regular source of power.

Bigbarney

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