Central Air W/ Electric Heat Pump

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anthony7812
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Stoker Coal Boiler: VanWert VA 400
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Location: Colley,Pennsylvania

Post Sat. Aug. 10, 2013 8:56 am

Well my aunts furnace crapped the bed. I would want nothing more than to tear out my furnace and give it to her. My problem is in september and april when coal isnt cost efficient I use my yearly allowance of about 2 cups of fuel oil lol. I also run 4 window air units in the summer so I was thinkin of the central air with electric heat pump option. I have no idea of the cost of these things. Im sure I could install myself but what about my electric bill? I know they are pretty much worthless when it dips much below 40 outside but not worried about that. Any thoughts or opinions?


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McGiever
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Stoker Coal Boiler: AXEMAN-ANDERSON 130 "1959"
Coal Size/Type: PEA / ANTHRACITE
Other Heating: Ground Source Heat Pump
Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek
Location: Junction of PA-OH-WV

Post Sat. Aug. 10, 2013 10:02 am

With running 4 window units you will do better on the electric bill with the heat pump option.
Since you already know the coal story you got that part down. :)
What you need to understand is the manufacture's term SEER Rating...to understand how to compare efficencies of operation...this rating has continued to go higher as compressors and system designs evolve with new models. The numbers have been getting impressive. :)
Sometimes there are rebates or incentives available fom State and/or Federal for HP's...but Never on Central AC. Generally, the rebate can match the cost of the price difference of upgrading to the HP...that can make it a " no brainer".

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carlherrnstein
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Post Sat. Aug. 10, 2013 12:16 pm

I have been looking at mini split air conditioner/heat pumps they look like a good option for people without ductwork in place.
http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&page=1&rh=n%3A261 ... onditioner

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Keepaeyeonit
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Other Heating: 46 year old oil furnace,and a crappy 25 year old heat pump
Location: Northeast Ohio.

Post Tue. Aug. 13, 2013 6:40 am

Anthony I have a old heat pump(9 seer)I know for a fact that the heat from the heat pump is not like a flame(oil,gas,wood,and coal)it keeps the house warm as long as its not to cold out. I have a duel fuel switch that shuts the heat pump off and fires the oil burner if the outside temp falls below 38*but its a cold heat(can't explain it but its different) using it in the AC mode is good no problem there as far as cost I think heat pumps cost 2x to 3x what a plain AC unit cost but its fairly cheep to run, my electric bill is the same weather I run the coal stove with the blowers and a humidifier or the heat pump but the heat with the stove is far better but the new heat pumps are better then my old one so that may have changed. Hope that helped. Keepaeyenoit

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Freddy
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Post Tue. Aug. 13, 2013 8:13 am

I've been looking at the new split type AC/ Heat pump units. A 18,000/ 9,000 BTU dual (two inside units driven by one outside unit) head one is about $3,000 before installation. You can do most of the work yourself, but it's mandatory a licensed AC person fire it off the first time. (At least here in Maine....also , there is a bit of a rebate. It was $800, but that one ran out of funding. Now it's looking like $600. Check with your electric company).

Yes, the SEER rating on the new units is very impressive, but perhaps not quite as good as it seems on the surface. They are variable speed compressors and the rating is calculated at the slowest speed, just before the room "is satisfied". Under full load at full speed the rating is lower, BUT... the bottom line is,: The new ones ARE much more efficient than the ones of just 5 or 6 years ago, even if the numbers aren't 100% accurate.

I'm told the new ones are better at getting heat at lower outside temps..... even down to 10 degrees or thereabout. They are less efficient at making heat as the temp drops but still better than an element type electric heater. I do not know if or how they tell you "It's too cold outside to make heat".

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anthony7812
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Post Tue. Aug. 13, 2013 8:15 am

I know these units are pretty lame at best when it gets cold. My stove heats my entire house in the dead of winter no problem, it's the 55 to 65 degree days when I need heat but not the coal fire follow me. We want to get rid of the window air units and I want out of the oil game so instead of electric baseboard I am looking into the heat pump setup. My big concern was what my electric bill would jump but so from what I have heard its not an astronomical amount.

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McGiever
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Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek
Location: Junction of PA-OH-WV

Post Tue. Aug. 13, 2013 9:25 am

Anthony...are you looking for only a ductless solution?

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anthony7812
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Post Tue. Aug. 13, 2013 9:32 am

No I am hoping to utilize my current ductwork from the hot air furnace.


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oros35
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Post Tue. Aug. 13, 2013 10:11 am

I have the heat pump/ac in my house. it's great and cheap untill it gets real cold, but with coal it rarely runs when it's cold.

My electric bill goes up at most $50-75 in the hottest months. Most of the time I really don't notice the difference in cost it's not a significant change, less than $20 probably.

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anthony7812
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Post Tue. Aug. 13, 2013 10:46 am

oros35 wrote:I have the heat pump/ac in my house. it's great and cheap untill it gets real cold, but with coal it rarely runs when it's cold.

My electric bill goes up at most $50-75 in the hottest months. Most of the time I really don't notice the difference in cost it's not a significant change, less than $20 probably.
does your duct run through ceilings or do you have a main duct from underfloor like a basement main duct run? Hvac tech thinks I should run new lines from attic in ceiling vents. I think its a waste of money.

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carlherrnstein
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Location: Clarksburg, ohio

Post Tue. Aug. 13, 2013 8:07 pm

Think of it like this, hot air rises cold air sinks. I would venture to guess that your ductwork was built to push warm air up with the help of the warm buoyant air. You might have problems trying to push cold(er) air up that is trying to sink. I don't know just a thought.

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oros35
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Location: Pittsburgh Pa

Post Wed. Aug. 14, 2013 10:29 am

anthony7812 wrote: does your duct run through ceilings or do you have a main duct from underfloor like a basement main duct run? Hvac tech thinks I should run new lines from attic in ceiling vents. I think its a waste of money.
Duct work is in the floor. Coming from above might be better, but mine works just fine.

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Sting
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Post Wed. Aug. 14, 2013 7:01 pm

Heat pumps are still not cost effective
They are gettin better

maybe some day

not today yet

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anthony7812
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Location: Colley,Pennsylvania

Post Thu. Aug. 15, 2013 6:34 am

Sting wrote:Heat pumps are still not cost effective
They are gettin better

maybe some day

not today yet
I agree, I could save my money and let the ole thermopride sit in the basement but for only a cup of fuel in a year and all the maintenance cost not to mention my algae'd up fuel, I want it out. Central air would be awfully nice so why not have the heat pump option? My other option would be to install electric baseboard. I know they have improved with the hydronic style.

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McGiever
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Stoker Coal Boiler: AXEMAN-ANDERSON 130 "1959"
Coal Size/Type: PEA / ANTHRACITE
Other Heating: Ground Source Heat Pump
Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek
Location: Junction of PA-OH-WV

Post Thu. Aug. 15, 2013 8:31 am

Remember to use the Fuel Calculator here...and to take biased personal comments with a grain of salt. The proof is out there. :)


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