Any Experiences With Coal in a Wood Insert Not Made for Coal

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garybial
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Posts: 3
Joined: Fri. Nov. 26, 2010 10:40 am
Other Heating: Pellet stove
Stove/Furnace Make: Osburn 2200 Insert

Post Fri. Nov. 26, 2010 11:04 am

Hello, Ive had a nagging question for some time and was wondering if anyone has done the following of what I'd liker to do so here goes: I have a wood burning insert (Osburn 2200) is there anyway to burn coal in it with either making a "fixture" for the coal or using it on an established wood fire bed? My goal is to have an overnight fire maintained and to help stretch the wood supply as I have to haul it from my source some distance. The fireplace does have a firebrick lining but has large glass doors, it has the secondary air to burn off gases. I don't want to damage my insert by experimenting and if this is not very practicable I will try a plan B with adding equipment elsewhere to my heating system. Thanks
Last edited by garybial on Fri. Nov. 26, 2010 11:37 am, edited 1 time in total.

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AA130FIREMAN
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Stove/Furnace Make: axeman anderson
Stove/Furnace Model: 130 anthratube

Post Fri. Nov. 26, 2010 11:26 am

Do you have access to anthracite coal ? Coal needs air supply under the fire bed and a way to damper down the air supply.

garybial
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Joined: Fri. Nov. 26, 2010 10:40 am
Other Heating: Pellet stove
Stove/Furnace Make: Osburn 2200 Insert

Post Fri. Nov. 26, 2010 11:36 am

I can get bagged coal, but haven't yet, and the stove does have a damper (draft). Anthracite is the route I though might work best.

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AA130FIREMAN
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Stove/Furnace Make: axeman anderson
Stove/Furnace Model: 130 anthratube

Post Fri. Nov. 26, 2010 12:02 pm

You would have to modify the insert with a damper below the fire and a shaker grade. Look at a stove like a Harman sf250, they can burn either wood or coal (not rated to because of EPA regulations.) They have dampers above and below the fire and a shaker grate. This is not an insert, possably you could remove the insert and set one on the hearth using the existing chimney.


CapeCoaler
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Stoker Coal Boiler: want AA130
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine BS#4, Harman MKII, Hitzer 503,...
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Location: Cape Cod, MA

Post Sat. Nov. 27, 2010 1:03 pm

Hitzer 503...
http://www.hitzer.com/products/stove/Model-503-E_ ... ce-Insert/
The 'rents love it...
Copy the design or just buy a coal insert...
The hopper pulls out if you want to burn some wood...
But you want to run it as a coal stove...
Much less work... :D
I am not an engineer, train or otherwise!
I stay at a Holiday Inn at least once a year!
Most of all I do have common sense and a practical application of logic.
Oh, add humor, on the dry side, along with a wee bit 'o sarcasm.

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lowfog01
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Post Sat. Nov. 27, 2010 5:10 pm

garybial wrote: I don't want to damage my insert by experimenting and if this is not very practicable I will try a plan B with adding equipment elsewhere to my heating system. Thanks
You are going to get very frustrated with trying to burn coal in an insert designed for burning wood. As the guys have told you a coal stove or insert needs a set of shakable grates to facilitate the removal of ash and a dedicated source of under fire draft. A coal fire burns from the bottom up and you control the heat production by how much air you allow to move through the coal bed. Yes, some stoves claim to burn either fuel but they mostly don't. You need to get the appliance designed for the fuel you plan to burn. If it were me I'd look for a coal stove which could be installed using the existing chimney or a coal burning insert which would set right in the fireplace. There are many types of coal appliances available that can either completely replace you current heating system or greatly reduce your heating bills as a supplemental heating source.

Having said that, I remember reading on the forum a posting from someone who placed a handful of coal on his wood fire prior to going to bed. In this way he was able to extend the length of burn of the wood fire. He apparently didn't care about keeping the coal burning but cleaned the ashes out and started over each night. That doesn't take advantage of the benefits of coal but it apparently fit his needs. Good luck, Lisa
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Josh H
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Stove/Furnace Make: dutch west medium Hitzer 354
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Post Wed. Dec. 08, 2010 8:59 pm

You CANNOT keep up with the ash generated by coal without a shaker grate and an ashpan as big as the firebox. I do encourage you to try it though, it won't hurt anything, you will just be frustrated when you have to let the fire burn out to deal with the ash.
lowfog01 wrote:You are going to get very frustrated with trying to burn coal in an insert designed for burning wood. As the guys have told you a coal stove or insert needs a set of shakable grates to facilitate the removal of ash and a dedicated source of under fire draft. A coal fire burns from the bottom up and you control the heat production by how much air you allow to move through the coal bed. Yes, some stoves claim

ASea
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Post Wed. Jan. 14, 2015 10:56 pm

My Great Grandfather burned large chunks of blacksmiths coal in his fireplace to last the overnight and when it get really cold out. I believe blacksmiths and bituminous coal are the same. The fireplace did have a big grate though.
"Your not getting another Coal Stove" Jacinta Seamans


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warminmn
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Post Wed. Jan. 14, 2015 11:03 pm

Just 2 observations. First, your glass in the door likely wont work with coal. 2nd, doesnt have to have shaker grates if you can somehow make a slot for a slicer, but with an insert that may not work. It does need a grate though. just wanted to mention that too.
I'm just an old chunk of coal now Lord but I'm gonna be a diamond some day - Billy Joe Shaver

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coalkirk
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Stoker Coal Boiler: 1981 EFM DF520
Coal Size/Type: anthracite/rice coal
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Post Thu. Jan. 15, 2015 7:08 am

garybial wrote:Hello, Ive had a nagging question for some time and was wondering if anyone has done the following of what I'd liker to do so here goes: I have a wood burning insert (Osburn 2200) is there anyway to burn coal in it with either making a "fixture" for the coal or using it on an established wood fire bed? My goal is to have an overnight fire maintained and to help stretch the wood supply as I have to haul it from my source some distance. The fireplace does have a firebrick lining but has large glass doors, it has the secondary air to burn off gases. I don't want to damage my insert by experimenting and if this is not very practicable I will try a plan B with adding equipment elsewhere to my heating system. Thanks
One word, no
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Burning rice coal in a 1981 EFM DF520, nut coal in a hand fired Jotul 507.

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coaledsweat
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Post Thu. Jan. 15, 2015 8:19 am

Sounds like the makings of a frustrating failure with anthracite. Bituminous maybe. Best to get an appliance designed for coal as the burning characteristics of wood and coal are vastly different.
Nothing is impossible for people who don't have to do it themselves.

ASea
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Posts: 265
Joined: Thu. Nov. 27, 2014 8:55 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Coal Chubby
Baseburners & Antiques: Our Glenwood 111
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Nut
Other Heating: Peerless Boiler with Cast Iron Baseboards
Location: Athol Massachusetts

Post Thu. Jan. 15, 2015 10:27 am

coaledsweat wrote:Sounds like the makings of a frustrating failure with anthracite. Bituminous maybe. Best to get an appliance designed for coal as the burning characteristics of wood and coal are vastly different.
If you watch craigslist you should be able to find a coal insert for short or at least reasonable money. I hear the Hitzer inserts are awesome. Like I said My Great Grandfather burned coal in his fireplace he had a grate though. He lived on 140 acres most of it wooded and he turned to coal when the going got cold. That's all I need to know.

Stay Warm
"Your not getting another Coal Stove" Jacinta Seamans

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