Replacing a Cast Iron Utica Dry Base Oil Fired Boiler

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traderfjp
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Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing 3
Location: New York

Post Fri. Jul. 10, 2009 11:20 pm

I have a cast iron Utica dry base boiler that is about 34 years old. It still works great and doesn't leak and the boiler only has makes heat for our basement where my mother lives. The boiler is rated for 117k BTU's so I have turned down the aquastat to 120-150. I also have a 48' coil running from the boiler into my coal stove. I'm using about 30-40 gallons a month. I'm trying to figure out if it's worth changing out the boiler to a high efficiency model and maybe an inderect hot water heater. I don't have room for a coal boiler so that isn't an option. I also have a 32 gallon Bock hot water heater. Any thoughts on this setup and my options?
Disclaimer: I'm not an expert in any coal or plumbing related field. I only post my own experiences, research and common sense. If you choose to use any of the information in this post or any other post you do so at your own risk.

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coaledsweat
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Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260M
Coal Size/Type: Pea
Location: Guilford, Connecticut

Post Mon. Jul. 13, 2009 10:03 pm

traderfjp wrote:It still works great and doesn't leak

I'm trying to figure out if it's worth changing out the boiler to a high efficiency model
I would think you are looking at about $4K for a good boiler, another $1.5 for taxes freight and install maybe. That is a lot of steam (around 25 tons of coal :o ).
1. Do nothing, it ain't broke.........
2. Find a nice used dual fuel (coal/oil) and replace the existing boiler and sell your stove. Cost could run $1000-3000 I'm guessing, could go high/low from there depending on your "coal personality". :)
Nothing is impossible for people who don't have to do it themselves.

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traderfjp
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Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing 3
Location: New York

Post Tue. Jul. 14, 2009 12:55 am

I got a price of 1729.00 for a Buderus and I can use my Reillo head which is fairly new. I'm figuring a 1k for an install and another 500 in parts. I really don't want to deal with coal in my basement and have to bother my mom everytime I have to take the ashes out. The boiler is also 35 years old and when I sell the house is 12 years or so the boiler will be an issue so I figure I may as well do it now and benefit from the savings. The lowest BTU rating for the Buderus is 134k which might be a little overkill.
Disclaimer: I'm not an expert in any coal or plumbing related field. I only post my own experiences, research and common sense. If you choose to use any of the information in this post or any other post you do so at your own risk.


CapeCoaler
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Stoker Coal Boiler: want AA130
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine BS#4, Harman MKII, Hitzer 503,...
Coal Size/Type: Pea/Nut/Stove
Location: Cape Cod, MA

Post Tue. Jul. 14, 2009 7:31 am

Got space outside for a coal boiler shed?
I am not an engineer, train or otherwise!
I stay at a Holiday Inn at least once a year!
Most of all I do have common sense and a practical application of logic.
Oh, add humor, on the dry side, along with a wee bit 'o sarcasm.

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traderfjp
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Posts: 1800
Joined: Wed. Apr. 19, 2006 10:32 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing 3
Location: New York

Post Tue. Jul. 14, 2009 9:35 am

An outside boiler is not a bad idea. I guess I would need to buuild a shed and then get a boiiler to go inside?
Disclaimer: I'm not an expert in any coal or plumbing related field. I only post my own experiences, research and common sense. If you choose to use any of the information in this post or any other post you do so at your own risk.

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