Latrobe stove / Baltimore heater prices back in the day

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gardener
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Post by gardener » Wed. Mar. 04, 2020 8:16 am

Came across this November 1914 advertisement, and noticed how much more expensive the Latrobe stove was compared the ranges, oak stoves, and others in the advertisement.

I thought there was slightly less iron in a style of Latrobe stove pictured than for an oak stove, and definitely so of a kitchen range.

I think John Latrobe died in the 1880s? So he wouldn't be collecting fees on his invention. (?) I think I recall reading he quit pursue patent infringements within 20 years of his invention.

Why would this Latrobe stove be so expensive to the other offerings?
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by the way, saw a letter by John Latrobe is coming up for auction, penned to his ?brother? about legal business

 
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Post by KingCoal » Wed. Mar. 04, 2020 9:52 am

there must have been market support and agreement to the first two sentences in the description is my guess

 
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Post by mntbugy » Wed. Mar. 04, 2020 10:05 am

There is alot of iron hiding under the sheet metal shroud especially a DD/ID version. Oopss forgot about the manual adjustable dampers to. Compared to an Oak.

Price wise right in line with a mica baseburner in the 40 dollar range.

 
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Post by Sunny Boy » Wed. Mar. 04, 2020 10:33 am

Demand is likely a big part of the reason for cost. There's as much complexity in ranges and much more cost of materials, but if they sell far more ranges, the production cost per unit can go down, thus making the ranges less expensive and more competitive in a extremely competitive market.

Every house had a kitchen, but how many had a fireplace to fit that Latrobe stove In ?

Paul


 
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Post by Cdon2948 » Wed. Mar. 04, 2020 10:38 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:
Wed. Mar. 04, 2020 10:33 am
Demand is likely a big part of the reason for cost. There's as much complexity in ranges and much more cost of materials, but if they sell far more ranges, the production cost per unit can go down, thus making the ranges less expensive and more competitive in a extremely competitive market.

Every house had a kitchen, but how many had a fireplace to fit that Latrobe stove In ?

Paul
I know i live in a bubble up in Maine but most period homes i see up till about 1890 usually have 3 chimnies. Its easy to tell later homes because they usually have one for the kitchen stove and then a chinney snack dab in the center for either a boiler or early forced hot air. It seems to me that there is a lot going on with Baltimore heaters with all their extra bits and pieces that could drive up costs.

Cornelius

 
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Post by Sunny Boy » Wed. Mar. 04, 2020 11:02 pm

If you look at the number of kitchen range type stoves that have survived verses how rare the Baltimore style heaters there are, it indicates that there were far more kitchen stoves made.

Industrial design progress, wear and breakage from use, wartime metal scrap drives, and some other factors affect the survival numbers of all types of stoves. As kitchen range design improved and old rangers were replaced, so did central heating systems replace individual heating stoves. So as antique coal and wood stoves of all types were replaced with something more modern, that tends to reduce the numbers that survive at about the same percentage to what was originally produced. So the more that were made , the more likely we are to see higher numbers of that type surviving today. In short the higher number of ranges we see available means they were produced in much higher numbers than some other types of stoves.

One of the largest producers of stoves was Glenwood and we see a very large number of Glenwoods surviving today. And, that's not because they were the best, either. There were many other makes of stoves of equal quality, but fewer survive because of fewer built.

We see the same thing in the antique car world, - high number mass produced cars like the Ford model T and Model A still survive in the tens of thousands. Lower production number cars that were more expensive and had limited production have much fewer numbers surviving, often in the single digits because their original production was so limited. Researchers have put it at around 10% of original production is the average survival rate across the auto industry. The only exception to that was the impact of the depression and war time rationing took a higher toll on bigger gas guzzling cars like Packard and Pierce-Arrow, Cadillac, Lincoln, etc.. They were scrapped in higher numbers, whereas cheaper to run cars like Fords and Chevys tend to be saved because being lighter they were less cost in gas and tires to run in tough economic times.

Paul

 
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Post by Merc300d » Fri. Mar. 06, 2020 2:30 pm

Paul , as always , a beautiful articulated , well presented statement ! 👍

 
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Post by Merc300d » Fri. Mar. 06, 2020 2:33 pm

As Skip,(Wilson) once told me , he depends more on his cook stoves than his other heating stoves. I believe everyone should have a cook stove at there disposal. They are more versatile and provide a vital importance.


 
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Post by franco b » Fri. Mar. 06, 2020 2:42 pm

Merc300d wrote:
Fri. Mar. 06, 2020 2:30 pm
Paul , as always , a beautiful articulated , well presented statement ! 👍
Plus one on that. Joe Biden should hire him to formulate sentences for him.

Clear explanation in Paul's posts has become a commonplace to the extent we just expect it, without giving credit where it's due.

 
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Post by Merc300d » Fri. Mar. 06, 2020 2:55 pm

franco b wrote:
Fri. Mar. 06, 2020 2:42 pm
Plus one on that. Joe Biden should hire him to formulate sentences for him.

Clear explanation in Paul's posts has become a commonplace to the extent we just expect it, without giving credit where it's due.
+1

 
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Post by Sunny Boy » Fri. Mar. 06, 2020 3:57 pm

Thanks guys.

But credit is really due to others on here that I learned from, like Wilson (Skip), Sir William, and many others very knowledgeable and passionate about antique coal stoves. Plus, thanks also goes to those that ask questions that get the thought processes going. If no one ever asked questions, likely no one would look for answers.

As for helping Biden, I'm not far behind in the addled brain contest. I keep forgetting how bad my memory is getting. :lol:

Paul

 
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Post by PJT » Tue. Mar. 10, 2020 4:55 pm

"Plus one on that. Joe Biden should hire him to formulate sentences for him.

Clear explanation in Paul's posts has become a commonplace to the extent we just expect it, without giving credit where it's due."


+1000 on that!
I wish you had been my calculus teacher, Paul.

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