Help identify this stove! Daisy Climax Stove Co.

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rondog6
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Posts: 1
Joined: Wed. Oct. 17, 2018 10:21 pm

Post By: rondog6 » Wed. Oct. 17, 2018 10:30 pm

Hello,
I live in Kent County, Texas on a ranch. Today i was out running my dogs and came across a piece of steel sticking out of the ground. After a couple good pulls i extracted this piece of a stove. I am Very interested in any details about this stove.
The front reads
DAISY CLIMAX STOVE CO.
QUINCY, ILL.

Inside there is two markings that read DAISY 611

Any details would be appreciated!

Thanks,
Ron
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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 15701
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Thu. Oct. 18, 2018 8:21 am

rondog6 wrote:
Wed. Oct. 17, 2018 10:30 pm
Hello,
I live in Kent County, Texas on a ranch. Today i was out running my dogs and came across a piece of steel sticking out of the ground. After a couple good pulls i extracted this piece of a stove. I am Very interested in any details about this stove.
The front reads
DAISY CLIMAX STOVE CO.
QUINCY, ILL.

Inside there is two markings that read DAISY 611

Any details would be appreciated!

Thanks,
Ron
Welcome RD.

It's the top section of a "Oak" type stove's barrel. The 11 in the 611 likely means it had an 11 inch diameter firepot in their 600 series. That was a common way of designating stove models in the early 1900s. That's a bit on the small size - likely meant to just heat one room in colder climates.

It would have had some type of bonnet that pivoted on a hook into that small hole in the top. By swinging the bonnet off to the side, you could heat a kettle, or cooking in a pan, or pot on that flat top.

Oak stoves were relatively simple design in a class called "cylinder stoves". They were often set up to burn either wood or coal.

Hope this helps,

Paul

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