Antique favourite baseburner

Wal
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Posts: 93
Joined: Tue. Jun. 27, 2017 8:53 am
Location: Uk

Post By: Wal » Mon. Jun. 25, 2018 9:26 am

Hi , Absolutely love the look of these type of stoves . Wonder if anyone who has one could give me a idea of heat output / coal consumption etc. Know obviously this would depend on outside temp , what temp you like in the house , and square footage of your home . But just a ballpark number . Also when funds permit ( probably a couple of years) wondered if any of you members restore these type of stoves for a hobby ? Looking at the people who do it for a living prices are high , so I have seen restoration done by members and they look fantastic , would anyone out there who has already restored this type of stove or one similar by another manufacturer be willing to tell me how much a fully restored stove would sell for . Basically as I live in the U.K. I would also have to take into consideration crating/ shipping and import duty so need to get a idea of costs ( plus try and convince the missus ha ha . Anyway any comments who be gratefully received . Wal .


jubileejerry
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Posts: 259
Joined: Sun. Nov. 17, 2013 5:29 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Wehrle Acme Sunburst 112, Hot Blast wood/coal burner
Stove/Furnace Make: Wehrle
Stove/Furnace Model: 112 Sunburst
Location: Northeast Nebraska

Post By: jubileejerry » Tue. Jun. 26, 2018 11:26 pm

Is high quality anthracite readily available to you? I would think that would be your first priority. A beautiful stove is worthless except as a conversation piece if you can't get coal. I rebuilt a Wehrle baseburner and love it. It is very efficient and is an exceptional heating machine. I can't say how much it is worth because there is nothing in my area to compare it to with respect to past sales. I would say in the right setting it could fetch in the 8-10000$ range, but that's really probably wishful thinking. It's worth that much to me in entertainment value though.

Wal
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Joined: Tue. Jun. 27, 2017 8:53 am
Location: Uk

Post By: Wal » Wed. Jun. 27, 2018 1:16 am

Hi , Thanks for the reply. At the moment I burn smokless ovoids in my stoves £375 - for a tonne. The coal merchant that delivers also sells anthracite £8.50 - 20kg I believe it's mined in wales . But as you have pointed out your beautiful stove is in $ range that with packing/crating and shipping to the uk would be prohibitive. Oh well , I will just have to be content to look at these beautiful stoves , and dream ha ha .

jubileejerry
Member
Posts: 259
Joined: Sun. Nov. 17, 2013 5:29 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Wehrle Acme Sunburst 112, Hot Blast wood/coal burner
Stove/Furnace Make: Wehrle
Stove/Furnace Model: 112 Sunburst
Location: Northeast Nebraska

Post By: jubileejerry » Wed. Jun. 27, 2018 1:18 pm

I'm sure if you are patient you could find a nice stove for less than $8000. I just used those figures because of comments I've had from people who have looked at my stove when they come in my store. Of course not one of them had his cash in hand when those comments were made. Imagine that... There are reputable dealers here like Wilson who could help you find something affordable.

Wal
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Location: Uk

Post By: Wal » Wed. Jun. 27, 2018 2:06 pm

Thanks - will have to wait a year or so as 🏡/ mortgage / bills take priority, but I will be sure to look him up when I'm ready to purchase . Many thanks

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bambooboy
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Posts: 780
Joined: Wed. May. 20, 2015 6:16 am
Baseburners & Antiques: imperial ringgold
Other Heating: woodstock soapstone,comfort,fisher,federal,fairy oak
Stove/Furnace Make: laundry stove
Location: joppa maryland

Post By: bambooboy » Wed. Jun. 27, 2018 2:32 pm

Wal,i'm fairly new to my baseburner,3 years.had wood stoves in the great room(17' ceilings) great room,dining area, kitchen 2 open doors to bedrooms. maybe 1200 sf for that part of house.wood never did the trick maybe 60 degrees f.on the coldest days. after learning coal&baseburner without a doubt i have gained 10 degrees.hope this helps on your decision.

Wal
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Joined: Tue. Jun. 27, 2017 8:53 am
Location: Uk

Post By: Wal » Thu. Jun. 28, 2018 1:26 am

Hi , Thanks for your input , my home sounds similar to yours , but mine is a bungalow, ( no upstairs rooms) At present I have 3 stoves in my home . Antique parlor stove in the lounge , ornate vintage stove in one of the bedrooms at the rear of the house , and a multi fuel vintage stove in the orangery at the back . All these stoves use smokless ovoids ( only use kindling to start the fire ) was looking to eventually swap the stove in the orangery for one of the antique American stoves with all the mica as it would be a focal point in that room , and then hopefully only need to put the other stoves on if it gets very cold . House gets toasty when everything is running , but a baseburner would be a fantastic stove , but as I previously said , crating / shipping / import duty will run to thousands of dollars , so have to put what spare money I have away and save up for a couple of years as it isn't a priority, just a want . But I can dream . Ha ha .

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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 15701
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Thu. Jun. 28, 2018 10:20 am

The main problem with using just one large stove not centrally located will be moving the heat sideways through rooms with doorways to the other end of the house. With a large mica base burner you might find that room too hot while trying to get the farthest room warm. Even using fans to move the heat has it's limits for distance through doorways.

I put my base heater in the center of the house - the living room has four doorways to the rest of the first floor - including double doors to the TV room where we spend more time. Luckily there's a central chimney in a wall close to all those doorways. That lets the stove heat more house without need of using addition power/cost to move the heat. Especially good when we have the occasional power outage.

And when we get down below zero F in January, often the forced hot air furnace is needed to help. The main cold air return for the furnace is right at the base of that chimney behind the stove. That pulls heat from the stove base and reduces the heating load on the furnace, further saving money.

Sometimes where we want the stove isn't always the best choice for utilizing it's wonderful natural heat output without needing additional modern means that reduce the savings and add noise, such as running fans 24/7.

Paul


Wal
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Location: Uk

Post By: Wal » Thu. Jun. 28, 2018 10:25 am

Thanks - will take that into consideration.

Wal
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Posts: 93
Joined: Tue. Jun. 27, 2017 8:53 am
Location: Uk

Post By: Wal » Thu. Jun. 28, 2018 10:51 am

Think that after what you said , my 3 stove setup is probably the best option as it heats different areas of the house and I can increase / decrease the heat according by altering the settings on each individual stove . Also financially it would be a mistake to outlay thousands of dollars and not feel the benefit. But I still love the look / quality of these stoves . The uk never produced anything to compare with these beautiful works of art .

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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 15701
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Thu. Jun. 28, 2018 12:36 pm

Yes, they are indeed beautiful, both in form and function.

How about a plan B ? Maybe Jubilejerry will let you have a picture of his beautiful mica base burner suitable for framing ? :D

And if you really want to torture yourself, look up his thread about the wonderful restoration he did. You can find it by clicking on his screen name and going to his post list on his profile page. It had me drooling on my keyboard just seeing the cast iron welding repairs he did. :yes:

Paul

Wal
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Post By: Wal » Thu. Jun. 28, 2018 2:10 pm

Sounds like a plan 😂😂

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bambooboy
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Posts: 780
Joined: Wed. May. 20, 2015 6:16 am
Baseburners & Antiques: imperial ringgold
Other Heating: woodstock soapstone,comfort,fisher,federal,fairy oak
Stove/Furnace Make: laundry stove
Location: joppa maryland

Post By: bambooboy » Thu. Jun. 28, 2018 2:27 pm

Wal wrote:
Thu. Jun. 28, 2018 1:26 am
Hi , Thanks for your input , my home sounds similar to yours , but mine is a bungalow, ( no upstairs rooms) At present I have 3 stoves in my home . Antique parlor stove in the lounge , ornate vintage stove in one of the bedrooms at the rear of the house , and a multi fuel vintage stove in the orangery at the back . All these stoves use smokless ovoids ( only use kindling to start the fire ) was looking to eventually swap the stove in the orangery for one of the antique American stoves with all the mica as it would be a focal point in that room , and then hopefully only need to put the other stoves on if it gets very cold . House gets toasty when everything is running , but a baseburner would be a fantastic stove , but as I previously said , crating / shipping / import duty will run to thousands of dollars , so have to put what spare money I have away and save up for a couple of years as it isn't a priority, just a want . But I can dream . Ha ha .
had a feeling orangery was a type of greenhouse,did a search before posting. i have a stand alone 14x19 greenhouse that is just great in winter for a workshop.when sun is shining,no need for stoves.

Wal
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Posts: 93
Joined: Tue. Jun. 27, 2017 8:53 am
Location: Uk

Post By: Wal » Thu. Jun. 28, 2018 5:26 pm

Hi , This is part of my orangery , it's a glass roof, solid walls , and basically adds another room to your property , it's 35'-12' can only get half in photo. Built a mock fireplace out of reclaimed brick to enclose the flue pipe , and beam came out of a old church . My stove will burn wood , coal , or peat . Just thought I would clear things up .
Attachments
image.jpg
Orangery

Wal
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Posts: 93
Joined: Tue. Jun. 27, 2017 8:53 am
Location: Uk

Post By: Wal » Fri. Jun. 29, 2018 3:03 am

IMG_0364.MOV
Columbian stove works parlor stove
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. Just thought you might like to see my parlor stove , refurbished myself and keeps the lounge nice and toasty


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