Glenwood #6 Brick Molds & Pattern Casting

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Pauliewog
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Post By: Pauliewog » Sun. Apr. 01, 2018 1:19 am

While working on making a lightweight reusable plastic pattern for the Glenwood magazines I researched and purchased a few different types of casting resins and mold rubbers.

Rather than send original small parts such as handles, dampers or latches to the foundry to be cast these parts can be easily and inexpensively cast out of plastic.

The first type of mold casting rubber I purchased was a brush on latex. This is the least expensive to purchase, has a relatively long shelf life, and is compatability with concrete and most casting resins. The drawbacks are it's flimsy and requires a mother mold (stiffening outer shell), requires a minimum of 10 thin coats (with an hour between coats) and is not as durable as a silicone or urethane rubber mold.

I was able to salvage 3 decent bricks from the G6 (One top and two bottom) to patch up and use as my patterns.

The first step was to create a stable base out of a non sulphur modeling clay that would extend about an inch around the brick.

Next was to give it a coat of mold release (Pam cooking spray) and brush on a thin coat of latex. The latex takes about an hour to dry between coats and as long as you recoat it within 24 hours the next layer will bond. It requires a cure time of 3 to 4 days at room temperature or 4 hours at 110*F. (I used the oven) :D
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After it was cured, it was time to build a form around the clay and pour the mother mold. The form was just a few left over pieces of vinyl flooring taped together. I had some left over floor leveling cement that sets up really quick and it makes a strong mold base.
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A few hours later the concrete was set. Flipped it over, removed the clay, and it was ready to use.

Mixed up some refractory cement, and troweled it in the form.
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Because this mold does not have a top like Sonny Boy's it was necessary to wait about an hour and rescreed it as it started to slump :?

The bricks came out nice...... but that extra step
had to be eliminated.

This type mold is great for making a few bricks but not when you have over 100 to do. :lol:

Soooo.... It was back to the drawing board.......... While removing the finished bricks, I got an idea. :idea:

Stay tuned.

Paulie


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Pauliewog
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Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Alaska 140 Dual Paddle Feed
Baseburners & Antiques: Fame Rosemont #20, Home Stove Works #25, Glenwood #6, Happy Thought Oak, Merry Bride #214, Sunnyside, Worlds Argand #114, New Golden Sun , & About 30 others.
Coal Size/Type: Stove, Chesnut, Pea, Rice / Anthracite
Location: Pittston, Pennsylvania

Post By: Pauliewog » Sun. Apr. 01, 2018 2:13 am

While waiting for my polyurethane mold rubber to come in, I grabbed a few 1"×6" boards and started cutting them up.

Since the top of the lower brick and the bottom of the upper brick only have a slight taper, I decided on a two piece mold box open at the top with the bricks suspended at a slight angle, so that they can be poured into the box and screeded off square with the top.

They would be doweled together, and register marks placed in the clay around the outer edge of the pattern brick to align both halves.
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Next was to determine the volume required to fill the one side of each mold box. The polyurethane mold rubber is a two part system and only has a 20 minute pour time. Any excess that is mixed will be wasted, and according to my original calculations I should have about 3 oz left from the kit.
I used black beauty blast material for the measurements.
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Then it was time to measure out the resin and do the first pour.
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First pour went well, waited 24 hours, split the mold, cleaned off the clay, gave it a spray of Pam, closed it up and did the second half. It was close..... only had an ounce left . I will demold it tomorrow and give it three or four days to completely cure.
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More tomorrow.

Paulie

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Keepaeyeonit
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Post By: Keepaeyeonit » Sun. Apr. 01, 2018 6:32 am

Nice work Paulie :clap: That will work for a 100 bricks as long as your not in a hurry :lol: Don't worry you'll get it we have confidence in you :yes:

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Post By: KingCoal » Sun. Apr. 01, 2018 7:39 am

WOW nice work. looks like you are about to take over the GW BH retsorer market. how many of them do you have now ?? :P

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Post By: Sunny Boy » Sun. Apr. 01, 2018 9:00 am

Nice work, Paulie.

The bricks I cast for my #6, using the Rutland castable refractory, have held up very well. The #6 has only been running for two months, but no cracks so far - even though I've been running the firebed quite hot to heat this monstrosity of a house. But Wilson and I determined it would be better to have the bricks fit a bit loosely to lessen possibility of heat expansion stress on them, so that might be partially why. The bricks can still float a bit but the firebed holds then in place and ash buildup behind them has not been the problem we thought it might be.

And, those poly molds held up well for me making more than one set. Better than any latex molds I've made in the past. Plus, as far as I know, Wilson is still getting good usage of the molds since I turned them over to him.

Paul

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Post By: wilsons woodstoves » Mon. Apr. 02, 2018 12:10 pm

paul, the moulds have shown no wear at all, i mix 1/3 fire clay 1/3 sand and1/3 Portland cement. they dry in place in a #6 fire pot that sits on top of a no6 or what ever is heating my shop at the time ,I also cover top off pot and let bricks cure until i need them, cannot thank you enough............wilson

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joeq
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Post By: joeq » Mon. Apr. 02, 2018 4:27 pm

Another amazing creation Paulie. I use-ta think that bricks should last a lifetime once recast, seeing a lot of the antiques still had their originals, but them round firepots are hell on bricks. If people are actually using their stoves for heat, it seems to me they'll need replacements every 3-5 years, due to the extremely hostile environment they live in. I wish there were a way to coat, or cover the bricks with something, to offer some type of protection from the slag that accumulates. Chiseling at them in the off season scares me to death that they'll just end up cracking apart.

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Pauliewog
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Post By: Pauliewog » Mon. Apr. 02, 2018 11:44 pm

Keepaeyeonit wrote:
Sun. Apr. 01, 2018 6:32 am
Nice work Paulie :clap: That will work for a 100 bricks as long as your not in a hurry :lol: Don't worry you'll get it we have confidence in you :yes:
Thanks Barry, My choices were to either move up closer to Skip, purchase a trucking company and bring them home as a backhaul, or make some of my own. :)

Before retiring, part of my business was casting replacement refractory in
high temp ovens, kilns, and furnaces so making a few bricks was just a natural. If I could get shipping rates anywhere close to what Amazon pays I wouldn't be making them. :D

The Rutland castable refractory firms up relatively quick so for right now I plan to cast a set in the morning and another in the evening.

Paulie


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Pauliewog
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Coal Size/Type: Stove, Chesnut, Pea, Rice / Anthracite
Location: Pittston, Pennsylvania

Post By: Pauliewog » Tue. Apr. 03, 2018 12:00 am

KingCoal wrote:
Sun. Apr. 01, 2018 7:39 am
WOW nice work. looks like you are about to take over the GW BH retsorer market. how many of them do you have now ?? :P
Not by a long shot buddy, my passion are the square mica stoves. :D

Since Williams videos, there seems to be a bigger interest in the Glenwoods here in Pa.

I'm keeping the one you saw for the shop, three are spoken for, and the other is missing a few parts.

The Antique Stove Association Convention is in July and Carol & I plan to be at Wilsons for one full day.

Hopefully I'll come back with the parts needed to complete that one and the Herald.

Paulie

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Pauliewog
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Coal Size/Type: Stove, Chesnut, Pea, Rice / Anthracite
Location: Pittston, Pennsylvania

Post By: Pauliewog » Tue. Apr. 03, 2018 12:33 am

Sunny Boy wrote:
Sun. Apr. 01, 2018 9:00 am
Nice work, Paulie.

The bricks I cast for my #6, using the Rutland castable refractory, have held up very well. The #6 has only been running for two months, but no cracks so far - even though I've been running the firebed quite hot to heat this monstrosity of a house. But Wilson and I determined it would be better to have the bricks fit a bit loosely to lessen possibility of heat expansion stress on them, so that might be partially why. The bricks can still float a bit but the firebed holds then in place and ash buildup behind them has not been the problem we thought it might be.

And, those poly molds held up well for me making more than one set. Better than any latex molds I've made in the past. Plus, as far as I know, Wilson is still getting good usage of the molds since I turned them over to him.

Paul
Thanks Paul ! I had really good luck with the Rutland Castable Refractory also and used it in the last half dozen firepots.

I'm having trouble finding the 50 lb bags of fireclay in our area and Amazon Prime sends the Rutland buckets here 2nd day air with no shipping costs.

I have a set of bricks here I picked up from Deepwoods that Wilson made with your molds. They look great and fit really nice in the stove.
So I can also attest your molds are holding up fine. :D
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This was my first attempt using latex for molds. I used silicone and urethane for paving brick molds and concrete stamping pads in the past with good results and looking back the urethane is definitely the way to go.

Paulie

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Coal Size/Type: Stove, Chesnut, Pea, Rice / Anthracite
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Post By: Pauliewog » Tue. Apr. 03, 2018 1:04 am

joeq wrote:
Mon. Apr. 02, 2018 4:27 pm
Another amazing creation Paulie. I use-ta think that bricks should last a lifetime once recast, seeing a lot of the antiques still had their originals, but them round firepots are hell on bricks. If people are actually using their stoves for heat, it seems to me they'll need replacements every 3-5 years, due to the extremely hostile environment they live in. I wish there were a way to coat, or cover the bricks with something, to offer some type of protection from the slag that accumulates. Chiseling at them in the off season scares me to death that they'll just end up cracking apart.
Your too kind Joe :lol: I'm at a loss as to the reason the round firepots especially the Glenwoods, get that clinkered up :o

Is it worse with certain veins of coal, type of refractory mix, running the stove at really high temperatures, lack of maintainence or a combination?

I've been burning coal for well over 50 years and never owned a stove that got this much slag buildup.
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Are you getting a buildup on the 111 ?

I'll be shutting my stove down in a few weeks and will post a pic of the firepot. It's still on its original light up and I never reached in to scrape the sides, so time will tell.

Paulie

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Coal Size/Type: Stove, Chesnut, Pea, Rice / Anthracite
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Post By: Pauliewog » Tue. Apr. 03, 2018 1:19 am

wilsons woodstoves wrote:
Mon. Apr. 02, 2018 12:10 pm
paul, the moulds have shown no wear at all, i mix 1/3 fire clay 1/3 sand and1/3 Portland cement. they dry in place in a #6 fire pot that sits on top of a no6 or what ever is heating my shop at the time ,I also cover top off pot and let bricks cure until i need them, cannot thank you enough............wilson
Skip, When we relined the refractory floors in burn off and porcelain ovens we also used perlite in the mix.

Any idea what the perlite did ?

Paulie

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Pauliewog
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Coal Size/Type: Stove, Chesnut, Pea, Rice / Anthracite
Location: Pittston, Pennsylvania

Post By: Pauliewog » Tue. Apr. 03, 2018 1:27 am

Almost forgot .......... I demolded the other half of the two piece mold tonight and set it near the stove for its final cure. :D

Paulie
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Post By: Sunny Boy » Tue. Apr. 03, 2018 1:48 am

joeq wrote:
Mon. Apr. 02, 2018 4:27 pm
Another amazing creation Paulie. I use-ta think that bricks should last a lifetime once recast, seeing a lot of the antiques still had their originals, but them round firepots are hell on bricks. If people are actually using their stoves for heat, it seems to me they'll need replacements every 3-5 years, due to the extremely hostile environment they live in. I wish there were a way to coat, or cover the bricks with something, to offer some type of protection from the slag that accumulates. Chiseling at them in the off season scares me to death that they'll just end up cracking apart.
Joe,

When I was cleaning the years of clinker scale off the original fireclay bricks in my range, I found that using a light 10 ounce hammer, and holding the chisel parallel with the brick face, it will flake off the scale and not crack the bricks. That way the force of the blow is being spread along the surface rather than down into the brick if the chisel were to be held at an angle to the brick surface.

Use lots of light taps and go slowly by just chipping away around the edges of each clinker cluster to reduce it bit by bit, rather than try to remove it all with just a few strong blows. ;)

Paul

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Post By: Sunny Boy » Tue. Apr. 03, 2018 2:00 am

wilsons woodstoves wrote:
Mon. Apr. 02, 2018 12:10 pm
paul, the moulds have shown no wear at all, i mix 1/3 fire clay 1/3 sand and1/3 Portland cement. they dry in place in a #6 fire pot that sits on top of a no6 or what ever is heating my shop at the time ,I also cover top off pot and let bricks cure until i need them, cannot thank you enough............wilson
Thanks Wilson. Glad to hear they are getting good use.

How well does that three-part mix hold up compared to the Rutland castable ? Does it also get clinkers fusing to it after a few months ?

The first set of Rutland bricks I made for my #6 are starting to show some rusty clinker scale fusing to the surface. I admit that I've been running it rather hard, so I'm not surprised. And that Tractor Supply Kimmel's has a lot of iron in the ash, which makes it really tough to get off the bricks !!!!

Glad I fitted the bricks a bit loosely. After shut-down I can take them out, which will allow me to more easily clean off any buildup before it gets as bad as my range was.

Paul


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