How long can I keep it burning? Kitchen/laundry stove

Redbopeep
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Baseburners & Antiques: Antique Shipmate 134 Marine coal and wood
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Post By: Redbopeep » Wed. Dec. 20, 2017 10:43 pm

Hey Paul, I'll have to pretty much let it burn down quite far for that. On Friday we will be gone for the day so I may be able to do it when we get back home.

I was not too worried about it because the wall between firebox and oven is actually very thick casting. It is not thin like other stoves I've seen.

I was not too concerned about damage leaving that brick out because the fellow who had the stove before me did not use firebricks though he used coal. Not sure why he didn't except odd sizes of bricks.

The fire is still going though the longest I've gone between shaker and adding a bit of coal is 8 hrs. It was very cool at that point and probably would haves died within an hour.

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Sunny Boy
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Post By: Sunny Boy » Wed. Dec. 20, 2017 11:00 pm

When you get it cleaned out, I'm curious what the dimensions of the firebox are with the firebricks in place. And what the thickness is of those bricks.

Since the castings are thick, you might be able to line the firebox with ramset refractory and make the lining thinner than the bricks. That way you gain more coal volume in the firebed to run proportionally longer between refuelings.

Paul

Redbopeep
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Posts: 30
Joined: Wed. Oct. 04, 2017 5:47 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Antique Shipmate 134 Marine coal and wood
Coal Size/Type: nut size

Post By: Redbopeep » Sat. Dec. 23, 2017 3:30 pm

The Ramset refractory would make a lot of sense. I cast our firebricks -- the thickness is 1" and it really insulates the oven from the heat of the firebox. With the firebrick in place, using coal, the oven will not arise above 375F or so even if the firebox is crazy hot. With the firebrick out, we can get up to 450F easily. If I use Ramset, the heat will transfer to the oven while at the same time the metal will be protected from the direct contact with the hot coal. Further, with the Ramset, I can probably form it so it will not fall over while underway (simply by giving the Ramset a couple ears up around the "holder" that is supposed to keep the firebrick in place. Seems like that will be a project for the spring though.


Redbopeep
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Posts: 30
Joined: Wed. Oct. 04, 2017 5:47 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Antique Shipmate 134 Marine coal and wood
Coal Size/Type: nut size

Post By: Redbopeep » Mon. Jan. 15, 2018 12:59 am

Well it's still burning. So that's a month and a few days. It will be 5 weeks Tuesday. Now I figure it can stay on indefinitely. 😊

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Sunny Boy
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Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Mon. Jan. 15, 2018 7:16 am

Congrats :clap:

Those old stove builders were pretty smart. They knew how to make a compact cooking stove that can keep you warm and still burn long enough to get a night's sleep.

After all, who'd buy a stove that just makes tired, grouchy cooks ? :lol:

Paul

Redbopeep
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Posts: 30
Joined: Wed. Oct. 04, 2017 5:47 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Antique Shipmate 134 Marine coal and wood
Coal Size/Type: nut size

Post By: Redbopeep » Tue. Oct. 02, 2018 8:24 pm

Hi Sunny Boy -- I had that stove going for months. Amazing. Towards the late spring though when the weather was warming up it was hard to keep it burning when I'd try to let it just be banked, well, it would go out. Seemed like the only way to run it in warmer weather is with lots of air.

I just came here to look up what kind of refractory cement was recommended -- I think I'll get some and now (in Oct) before we start using the stove I'll make myself a new lining for the firebox. :)


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Lightning
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Post By: Lightning » Wed. Oct. 03, 2018 7:36 am

Awesome thread here, nice job to both of you :) normally in warmer weather the draft gets weaker which could be why it got increasingly more difficult to keep a fire, that'd be my guess.

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Sunny Boy
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Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Wed. Oct. 03, 2018 9:20 am

Thanks Lee.

That's great news, RBP. Glad to hear that your able to keep it going. :yes:

Yeah, it gets tougher to keep a good draft going as the weather warms. And a small firebox, with it's lower heat volume potential, makes it tougher.

I've run my range when it was 80F outside. But, to just maintain the firebed, I have to open the primary and pipe damper about twice as wide as it would need in cold weather. And I shutoff the water tank end of the range to send that heat to the chimney. Plus, by shutting it off, the water tank housing helps the draft by acting more like a heat shield for the oven flues than the heat extractor it is when it's dampers are open. When it comes time to cook, I have to open the primary and the MPD fully for about 5 minutes to heat the chimney and get the draft strength up so the cooktop is nice and hot.

The refractory lining will help, but don't go overboard (pun intended) on thickness. A thick liner is a tradeoff for firebed volume, which is needed to extend the burn times of small fireboxes.

Maybe you can put some insulation, such as rockwool, around the outside of the firebox to help maintain firebed heat, rather than give up firebox volume ????? Two inches of rockwool on the back side of my range oven made a big difference in oven temps,..... in addition to less heat being radiated out the back of the range to a kitchen outside wall.

Paul

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