My GW 116

Learn the ins and outs of designs that date back to the turn of the last century. Whether you are looking to restore an antique stove or have questions about modern reproductions you'll find the answers to your questions here.
Sunny Boy
Member
Posts: 12656
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post Tue. May. 16, 2017 2:42 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:
philthy wrote:Thats interesting.... Maybe there were different thickness for the different types? DJ says hes pretty sure his is less than 16 gauge though. Can you elaborate a little more on old vs new gauge measurements?

Back when these stoves were being made there was still quite a bit of each supplier/manufacture using their own, or some other standard, like Brown & Sharp, or US Standard.

One of the early makes of American cars I work on (from 1902 to early 30's), that car club has over 20K of the original factory drawings. They were one of the earliest auto manufacturers to join the SAE and they were also promoting engineering standards. Their engineers were some of the best and most innovative in the industry. All the blue prints for the sheet metal parts in those cars use that same US Standard Gage that I mentioned.

Today, some use the American Wire Gage that DLJ mentioned, some still use the US Standard Gage. But switch to galvanized steel, or sheet brass, or aluminum, and the gage thickness changes again for the same gage number. :o

When I call my metal supplier we use decimal thickness to avoid confusion. When I go there to pickup my order I bring my sheet metal gages along to make sure. A lot easier to use than trying to read a micrometer in a poorly lit warehouse. ;)

Edit. Those two pocket gages I use have the gage number next to each slot on one side and the decimal equivalent of that gage on the back side of the gage. One is the "US Standard Gage" I mentioned. The other gage in the pocket case is the "American Standard Wire Gage for non-ferrous metals" (aka AWG). I use that one for sheet aluminum.

Paul
So many stoves - so few chimneys. I must be coal-stone crazy.


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dlj
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Posts: 1267
Joined: Thu. Nov. 27, 2008 6:38 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters
Location: Monroe, NY

Post Tue. May. 16, 2017 9:54 pm

Paul,

Your mic didn't look like it was a ball end mic, couldn't really tell, but looked more like a double flat end mic. You can't actually measure a curved surface accurately with that kid of micrometer. Not saying you don't have 16 gauge, but if you didn't have a ball end mic, that measurement was not accurate.

Just for anyone that may like to have a copy, here's a scanned image of a table out of one of my old metallurgy books (lower left hand table on this page) that is a nice condensed version of different gauge sizes in a bunch of different systems, including some old ones...

dj
gauge20170516.jpg

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philthy
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Posts: 112
Joined: Sat. Nov. 09, 2013 9:15 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoke Koker Lite, Alaska Kast Konsole
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6, Glenwood #116
Location: Newville PA

Post Tue. May. 16, 2017 10:25 pm

And the plot thickens! You guys are good and I appreciate the education. Wasn't until this thread that I even knew about U.S. standard and AWG. I just figured "gauge" was a universal measurement.

I use to buy aluminum sheet for making race car panels and it was always referenced by grade and decimal thickness as in .050 5053 for example. Do they apply gauge measurements to that as well? Tubing is a lot easier as it is measured by outside diameter and wall thickness. Pretty hard to mess that up! :roll:
Fortune always favors the brave,
and never helps a man who does not help himself.
P. T. Barnum

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mntbugy
Member
Posts: 111
Joined: Fri. Dec. 23, 2016 2:36 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: D S 1500, Warm Moring 400
Baseburners & Antiques: Modern Glenwood 114, Clarion 115
Coal Size/Type: stove and nut and some bit
Other Heating: Propain
Location: clearfield,pa

Post Tue. May. 16, 2017 10:27 pm

Measured my 114 barrel with snap caliper. Got .045-.042 Thinner in bead edge were it stretched
Aluminum gauge is thinner than steel. Different for stainless steel also

Sunny Boy
Member
Posts: 12656
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post Tue. May. 16, 2017 11:40 pm

dlj wrote:Paul,

Your mic didn't look like it was a ball end mic, couldn't really tell, but looked more like a double flat end mic. You can't actually measure a curved surface accurately with that kid of micrometer. Not saying you don't have 16 gauge, but if you didn't have a ball end mic, that measurement was not accurate.

Just for anyone that may like to have a copy, here's a scanned image of a table out of one of my old metallurgy books (lower left hand table on this page) that is a nice condensed version of different gauge sizes in a bunch of different systems, including some old ones...

dj
gauge20170516.jpg
Dave,
Yes they are flat. But the center gap against the inside curve is almost too slight to see. It's in shadow in the picture but I checked it when I was mic-ing the surface in several places. It's only off by a few thousands at most. And at that, the gap is likely made up for by the what the original surface lost in thickness to rust and sand blasting.

Paul
So many stoves - so few chimneys. I must be coal-stone crazy.

Sunny Boy
Member
Posts: 12656
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post Tue. May. 16, 2017 11:44 pm

mntbugy wrote:Measured my 114 barrel with snap caliper. Got .045-.042 Thinner in bead edge were it stretched
Aluminum gauge is thinner than steel. Different for stainless steel also
And different again for galvanized sheet steel.

Paul
So many stoves - so few chimneys. I must be coal-stone crazy.

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Pauliewog
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Posts: 873
Joined: Mon. Dec. 02, 2013 12:15 am
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Alaska 140 Dual Paddle Feed
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Pittston Stove
Baseburners & Antiques: Fame Rosemont #20, Dickson Oak, Golden Oak, Happy Thought Oak, 1913 Herald Oak#16, (2)Comfort Stove
Coal Size/Type: Stove, Chesnut, Pea, Rice / Anthracite
Location: Pittston, Pennsylvania

Post Wed. May. 17, 2017 12:07 pm

I got a call back today from a former customer and he may have found a suitable heavy duty powered beader that the company no longer needs. Hopefully it's in decent condition and priced right.

I'm fortunate to have 24/ 7 access to a manual and four nice power rolls at the facility where I am setting up my new shop . The largest one in the last picture they use to roll up to 1/2" round stock and 3/16" plate. :D

Paulie
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Former anthracite contract strip miner

Sunny Boy
Member
Posts: 12656
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post Wed. May. 17, 2017 12:56 pm

3/16 huh ? That'll add new meaning to the term, bullet proof stove construction. :lol:


Paul
So many stoves - so few chimneys. I must be coal-stone crazy.


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Pauliewog
Member
Posts: 873
Joined: Mon. Dec. 02, 2013 12:15 am
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Alaska 140 Dual Paddle Feed
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Pittston Stove
Baseburners & Antiques: Fame Rosemont #20, Dickson Oak, Golden Oak, Happy Thought Oak, 1913 Herald Oak#16, (2)Comfort Stove
Coal Size/Type: Stove, Chesnut, Pea, Rice / Anthracite
Location: Pittston, Pennsylvania

Post Wed. May. 17, 2017 3:49 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:3/16 huh ? That'll add new meaning to the term, bullet proof stove construction. :lol:


Paul
On the bright side........ I don't think a 3/16" barrel will require a strengthing bead. That bigger roll has slots for rolling up to 1/2" round bar stock.

Maybe bend up a couple rings in place of the beads for decoration. :lol:

Paulie
Former anthracite contract strip miner

Sunny Boy
Member
Posts: 12656
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post Wed. May. 17, 2017 4:05 pm

Yeah, I noticed the grooved rollers on that hand crank model. Reminds me of the ones I used to see in the old tin-knocker shops and school metal shop classroom.

Paul
So many stoves - so few chimneys. I must be coal-stone crazy.

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philthy
Member
Posts: 112
Joined: Sat. Nov. 09, 2013 9:15 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoke Koker Lite, Alaska Kast Konsole
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6, Glenwood #116
Location: Newville PA

Post Sat. May. 20, 2017 7:37 pm

A little more work and a little messing around with the iphone.
Attachments
116 (2).jpg
Fortune always favors the brave,
and never helps a man who does not help himself.
P. T. Barnum

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mntbugy
Member
Posts: 111
Joined: Fri. Dec. 23, 2016 2:36 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: D S 1500, Warm Moring 400
Baseburners & Antiques: Modern Glenwood 114, Clarion 115
Coal Size/Type: stove and nut and some bit
Other Heating: Propain
Location: clearfield,pa

Post Sat. May. 20, 2017 7:50 pm

Looking good
Like that black & white pic, makes it look old timey

Sunny Boy
Member
Posts: 12656
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post Sun. May. 21, 2017 10:01 am

mntbugy wrote:Looking good
Like that black & white pic, makes it look old timey
+ 1. Nice affect.

Even nicer will be seeing it finished. ;)

Paul
So many stoves - so few chimneys. I must be coal-stone crazy.

User avatar
Pauliewog
Member
Posts: 873
Joined: Mon. Dec. 02, 2013 12:15 am
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Alaska 140 Dual Paddle Feed
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Pittston Stove
Baseburners & Antiques: Fame Rosemont #20, Dickson Oak, Golden Oak, Happy Thought Oak, 1913 Herald Oak#16, (2)Comfort Stove
Coal Size/Type: Stove, Chesnut, Pea, Rice / Anthracite
Location: Pittston, Pennsylvania

Post Sun. May. 21, 2017 1:58 pm

Coming along really nice, and it looks like you have the hardest part done. Did you try buffing out any of the nickel ?

Paulie
Former anthracite contract strip miner

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philthy
Member
Posts: 112
Joined: Sat. Nov. 09, 2013 9:15 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoke Koker Lite, Alaska Kast Konsole
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6, Glenwood #116
Location: Newville PA

Post Sun. May. 21, 2017 8:43 pm

Thanks guys.

Didn't get a chance to polish anything yet but getting there. I was just going to have it re-nickled but think I'll try and polish first. Nothing ventured nothing gained they say.
Fortune always favors the brave,
and never helps a man who does not help himself.
P. T. Barnum


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