Glenwood 116 to Help Out Little Tiget

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Sunny Boy
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Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Fri. Jan. 11, 2019 10:08 pm

Usually the round covers are fine, it's the eyes and tees that support them that go out of shape. You can buy recast eyes and tees for that model C right from Woodman's Parts Plus, in New Hampshire.

https://www.woodmanspartsplus.com/
Just put in the stove make in the search box and it lists all the parts they have for that make.

These round cover support plates are used on many models of Glenwood ranges that have the 8 inch round covers, such as the #108, 208, 408 and 508.

Here's the eye plate,
https://www.woodmanspartsplus.com/product.aspx?p_id=169411
Here's the Tee plate,
https://www.woodmanspartsplus.com/product.aspx?p_id=169412

Paul


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Wren
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: Tiger 130, Glenwood 116, Glenwood 208 C
Coal Size/Type: Stove
Other Heating: Drolet woodstove, gas
Location: Canada

Post By: Wren » Sat. Jan. 12, 2019 10:50 am

20190112_103530.jpg
Thank you. That will be a summer project I guess. The other thing about a book is that it doesn't notice things and can't comment on immediate problems. I know we are all very grateful.
I hoped I was wrong last night but this morning I took a picture. And right where you have said it tends to happen?I feel terrible. This stove was pretty much in perfect shape when it arrived.
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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 17467
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Sat. Jan. 12, 2019 12:52 pm

Well, the only way to prevent anything happening is to never use it,....and that's not why you bought it. ;)

If the crack will not cause a problem in an area that it would weaken the strength of supporting parts of the stove - such as near a door hinge, or attachment point for another part - then there is a way to deal with small stress cracks that turn up in cast iron that will allow the stove to live with it for many years of use, without need of being welded.

Wire brush the area clean, use a magnifier and mark the very ends of the crack with a felt tipped pen. Then, using a sharp pointed machinist's punch and light hammer, make a punch mark at each of the very ends of each crack. Then drill a "stopper hole" completely through at each punch mark, using about a 1/16 to 3/32 inch drill bit. A drilled hole right at the end of a cast iron crack will prevent it from traveling any further. But you must be certain the hole is at the very end of the crack, or it might keep traveling with heat stress.

Once the holes are dilled, since the stress that caused the crack is relieved it should then be fine.

Then just wipe some furnace cement into the holes to close them up so they don't leak air in and it's good to go again.

Paul
Last edited by Sunny Boy on Sat. Jan. 12, 2019 8:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Wren
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Posts: 516
Joined: Tue. Nov. 01, 2016 4:12 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Tiger 130, Glenwood 116, Glenwood 208 C
Coal Size/Type: Stove
Other Heating: Drolet woodstove, gas
Location: Canada

Post By: Wren » Sat. Jan. 12, 2019 7:26 pm

Its nice of you to say. Poor stove but yes, it's heating a family and dogs and cats and plants.
I dont know if I word try that myself... I have a brother a welder a province over but retired. Maybe... will it get worse quickly?

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Wren
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Posts: 516
Joined: Tue. Nov. 01, 2016 4:12 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Tiger 130, Glenwood 116, Glenwood 208 C
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Other Heating: Drolet woodstove, gas
Location: Canada

Post By: Wren » Sat. Jan. 12, 2019 7:44 pm

How time has gone. I remember when my brother was excited learning 1000 years ago and he said with I think an arc welder that the light shows how much longer a crack is than it seems to look at at first.

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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 17467
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Sat. Jan. 12, 2019 8:14 pm

Cracks in cast metal sometimes "look" longer when the area starts to glow because as it's heating up to welding temp, the crack will travel a bit more as the metal tries to expand locally with the sudden rise in temp just before it gets to the glowing stage.


That crack may have been there a long time and just too small to be noticeable. Then with recent use, it grew enough to be seen.

You can keep checking it to see if it's growing by scratching a line across each end of the crack with the point of a knife. Then look at it every few days and see if it's progressed beyond the scratch marks. If not, then the stress was relieved and it likely won't travel further unless the stove gets hotter than when the crack formed.

Paul

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Wren
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Posts: 516
Joined: Tue. Nov. 01, 2016 4:12 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Tiger 130, Glenwood 116, Glenwood 208 C
Coal Size/Type: Stove
Other Heating: Drolet woodstove, gas
Location: Canada

Post By: Wren » Sat. Jan. 12, 2019 9:00 pm

Thank you very much. Hey Joeq? If you're there, Sunny is a living book like in that children's movie.... Pagemaster.

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joeq
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Location: Northern CT

Post By: joeq » Sat. Jan. 12, 2019 11:09 pm

I never saw the movie Jen. What is the relevance?


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Wren
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Joined: Tue. Nov. 01, 2016 4:12 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Tiger 130, Glenwood 116, Glenwood 208 C
Coal Size/Type: Stove
Other Heating: Drolet woodstove, gas
Location: Canada

Post By: Wren » Sun. Jan. 13, 2019 9:12 pm

Well...he is a book of knowledge but alive and every new member starts a new adventure in stove knowledge. But its not like a book it changes as you turn the page. Sigh. It's a move for young people. Sorry.
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joeq
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Location: Northern CT

Post By: joeq » Sun. Jan. 13, 2019 11:29 pm

Well, I saw Snow White. Does that count?
Not trying to discredit your comparison Jen, just I'm not familiar with that movie, and now you've peaked my curiosity. But I do understand your appreciation for Pauls input (as many of us novice members do), along with the rest of this site. In just a few short years, with all the information gathered here, I've become comfortable running my stoves and know it would've taken much more time learning by my own mistakes, if I ever would learn at all. And it appears you're well established in a short time in this community too Jen. You "are" a fast learner, with lots of passion. Good for you. :)

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Wren
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Posts: 516
Joined: Tue. Nov. 01, 2016 4:12 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Tiger 130, Glenwood 116, Glenwood 208 C
Coal Size/Type: Stove
Other Heating: Drolet woodstove, gas
Location: Canada

Post By: Wren » Mon. Jan. 14, 2019 9:45 am

Last year I was following your burn time studies, its interesting to see how we're all managing and what advice y'all get too. Well I might seem overly grateful sometimes but the coal isn't exactly a hobby. During the wars someone sent a little criminal in to rip out all my wiring. Then it was...why don't you close down the house and move in with me?? Ha! My mama didn't raise no fool. A person who has trouble getting coal dust out from under her fingernails maybe, but not a fool.
So where I had hated technology in the past and cried years ago when my husband had tried to teach me to tape a show and I couldn't... it was ONLY through the internet that that I read of that guy who doesn't start up the anthracite in his wood coal furnace until it's below zero, and found the stoves to buy, and sources of anthracite...youtube...starting a coal stove and Williams white shirt sleeves with that beautiful stove, and the encouragement here at Nepa to keep trying. When it's all over I'll keep using the range for sure, and I prefer coal heat to gas that makes me queasy over 68, but then it will be a choice.
Not a quick learner this is my third January. Went from Tiger to 116 and now range at one end of house and 116 at the other.
AND when I look at the thermometer it's 80 in the living room and about 70 in the kitchen when I get back from work. It's terrific and I don't know if I mentioned that I heard an older lady say about missing the coal heat, " Well didn't we know it would come to this?"
People here heated with coal and the big churches did too, and didn't stop until late 50's. You can tell I have today off because I ran on and on here.
We all sort of ask the same questions but our mistakes are not exactly the same and sometimes it's nice to get straightened out before the fire is lost... a book would stare back, you know, and say, "see chapter three" but a book can't anticipate the lack of or level of understanding in each individual.
If you have grandchildren it's a nice movie. My youngest made me watch with them when they were about 12 and 13. But I confuse it with another movie The Never Ending Story perhaps.
I looked inside this morning when the fire was out and I don't see any crack on the inside. Is that normal and it's hidden under the liner?

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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 17467
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Mon. Jan. 14, 2019 10:35 am

Yes, sometimes a cast metal crack that shows on the surface doesn't go all the way through. But when drilling "stopper holes" at each end of a crack, the holes should go all the way through just in case.

Your doing very well. You've gone from a small heating stove, to a large one, and then added a kitchen range with more dampers to increase the learning curve.

It's easy to assume all coal stoves are the same, but they each have their operating differences. Then factor in the different chimney systems add to the mix. :o

It's taken me quite awhile to get used to the differences in when and how to tend, and how to set dampers for the #6 base heater. After 12 years of using the range with six dampers, you'd think it would be easy, but not so. Yes, both burn coal, but there are differences in how to best operate them and how they respond. And they are both quite different than the potbelly stoves I was using 35 - 45 years ago.

Each stove and chimney system has a "personality". Learn it, or it won't work well, are your only options. ;)

Paul

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Wren
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Posts: 516
Joined: Tue. Nov. 01, 2016 4:12 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Tiger 130, Glenwood 116, Glenwood 208 C
Coal Size/Type: Stove
Other Heating: Drolet woodstove, gas
Location: Canada

Post By: Wren » Mon. Jan. 14, 2019 10:52 am

I think its excellent for broadening the mind. I think the age of coal was great partly because of that last paragraph you wrote above. Taught people to think! Funny. I think we assume you and Melissa already knew everything.

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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 17467
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post By: Sunny Boy » Mon. Jan. 14, 2019 1:18 pm

I can understand that assumption , but, the world of coal stoves is vast and varied !!!!

Between Melissa and I, combined, we have about 70 years of living with coal stoves.

She grew up with a coal range and a big Oak parlor stove, much like we have now. Her parents used that heating setup until she was away at college.

I grew up hearing about coal stoves from my parents generation. Lots of houses used coal heat in Brooklyn until well after WWII. The house we lived in Flatbush still had the coal-fired steam heat when we moved further out on Long Island in 1956. So did both grand parent's houses in Brooklyn.

On Long Island, we had an old wood-grained cabinet style ventilator coal stove in a detached garage. It was given to my father by a friend who switched to gas heat. We used that whenever we had to work out there in winter.

Buddy I hung out with for many years after High School had a station master sized pot belly stove in a detached 2-1/2 car garage finished off as a family room and small workshop for his Dad. We mostly hung out there because his house and mine were too small to have a bunch of friends around. Plus, being a "Newfie", his father was partial to coal and often burned big blocks of canal coal in the living room fireplace, rather than wood.

My first house, a coworker gave me a small potbelly stove I used in my basement wood shop for about 12 years. That house still had the American coal-fired boiler that had been converted to burn oil sometime in the early 1960's. The original, all enclosed coal bin was still there and I reused it when I got the pot belly stove hooked up.

When I moved here, the now ex-wife wanted to use it as a planter, so I gave it to a friend to use in the log cabin he built.

Been using the range since Melissa bought it for me back in 2005. And the #6 since last mid winter.

So, for almost 50 years of my life I've been acquainted with coal stoves of many types,.....

............... but I'm still learning. That's what keeps it interesting for me. ;)

Paul

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Wren
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Joined: Tue. Nov. 01, 2016 4:12 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Tiger 130, Glenwood 116, Glenwood 208 C
Coal Size/Type: Stove
Other Heating: Drolet woodstove, gas
Location: Canada

Post By: Wren » Mon. Jan. 14, 2019 10:53 pm

Coal stories are great. Maybe Joeq's right. A book of coal memories would be nice...with lots of pictures or it didn't happen..
An all enclosed bin...with a lid you mean?


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