My New Crawford!

Learn the ins and outs of designs that date back to the turn of the last century. Whether you are looking to restore an antique stove or have questions about modern reproductions you'll find the answers to your questions here.
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scalabro
Member
Posts: 2815
Joined: Wed. Oct. 03, 2012 9:53 am
Baseburners & Antiques: 2 Crawford 40's, PP Stewart No. 14, Abendroth Bros "Record 40"
Coal Size/Type: Stove / Anthracite.
Other Heating: Oil fired, forced hot air.
Location: Southwick Massachusetts

Post Sun. Jan. 26, 2014 6:20 pm

McGiever wrote:
I also scored this unbroken upper grate for her while nosing about.
What's the outside and inside diameter of that? And can you get another one for me and my Our Glenwood 111? :yes: It's the same style as your Crawford.
Hi McGiever,

These will not fit a 111 as the fire pot is smaller.

Call Emory or Brandon at the stove hospital to see if they a have good set to sell. I think they have a couple of parts 111's there.

Cheers,
Scott


PJT
Member
Posts: 400
Joined: Fri. Jan. 06, 2012 11:11 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Magee Royal Oak; Glenwood Modern Oak 116
Other Heating: propane
Location: South Central CT

Post Sun. Jan. 26, 2014 10:28 pm

Gekko wrote:
wsherrick wrote:Nicest looking Harman I've ever seen.
Keep us updated.
:cheers:

Too funny!

Today I made a patch to cover the lower exh port hole. Then I put Mrs Crawford on her legs and installed the exh flange in the correct location to meet the existing chimney pipe. Tomorrow she will get some quick dress up rattle can black and it's off we go to coal nirvana.

Over the summer she be put in dry dock for a new back pipe so I don't have to see the scab patch, and a proper paint job.

Can't wait.

Cheers to all,
Scott
Gekko it looks to me that with the position of the outlet on the back pipe being so low that the smoke is going to travel about the same distance whether or the back pipe valve is open or closed......am I all wet or does that sound reasonable?

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scalabro
Member
Posts: 2815
Joined: Wed. Oct. 03, 2012 9:53 am
Baseburners & Antiques: 2 Crawford 40's, PP Stewart No. 14, Abendroth Bros "Record 40"
Coal Size/Type: Stove / Anthracite.
Other Heating: Oil fired, forced hot air.
Location: Southwick Massachusetts

Post Mon. Jan. 27, 2014 6:16 am

Gekko it looks to me that with the position of the outlet on the back pipe being so low that the smoke is going to travel about the same distance whether or the back pipe valve is open or closed......am I all wet or does that sound reasonable?[/quote]

PJT,

The back pipe is not used to route gases to the base on this style of stove. The gases are fed to the base by closing the valve at the top of the barrel exh flange, forcing the gases to travel around the fire pot inside the barrel of the stove, through the stove base, then out the lower exhaust flange/port. With the upper valve open the stove is in direct draft, the gas will then travel down the pipe and out the lower port and up the chimney.

You can see the area around the fire pot if you look back a few posts.

Hope that clears things up.

Cheers,
Scott

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McGiever
Member
Posts: 6002
Joined: Sun. May. 02, 2010 11:26 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: AXEMAN-ANDERSON 130 "1959"
Coal Size/Type: PEA / ANTHRACITE
Other Heating: Ground Source Heat Pump
Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek
Location: Junction of PA-OH-WV

Post Mon. Jan. 27, 2014 6:25 am

Gekko wrote:I also scored this unbroken upper grate for her while nosing about.

Hi McGiever,

These will not fit a 111 as the fire pot is smaller.

Call Emory or Brandon at the stove hospital to see if they a have good set to sell. I think they have a couple of parts 111's there.

Cheers,
Scott
Thanks Scott, I'll do as you said and give them a call.
SLOW AND STEADY WINS THE RACE

PJT
Member
Posts: 400
Joined: Fri. Jan. 06, 2012 11:11 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Magee Royal Oak; Glenwood Modern Oak 116
Other Heating: propane
Location: South Central CT

Post Mon. Jan. 27, 2014 12:00 pm

"The back pipe is not used to route gases to the base on this style of stove. The gases are fed to the base by closing the valve at the top of the barrel exh flange, forcing the gases to travel around the fire pot inside the barrel of the stove, through the stove base, then out the lower exhaust flange/port. With the upper valve open the stove is in direct draft, the gas will then travel down the pipe and out the lower port and up the chimney."

Thanks Scott that clears it up. Is there any problem with the draft drawing well when you first fire it up since the smoke must travel down to the outlet instead of up?

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wsherrick
Member
Posts: 3731
Joined: Wed. Jun. 18, 2008 6:04 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size
Location: High In The Poconos

Post Mon. Jan. 27, 2014 12:34 pm

It will work fine like that. The exhaust goes down inside the stove, around the fire pot, then under the base before it gets to the back pipe. The entire fire bed is surrounded and insulated by both heavy bricks and hot exhaust. That's why these are simply unmatched when it comes to combustion efficiency.

PJT
Member
Posts: 400
Joined: Fri. Jan. 06, 2012 11:11 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Magee Royal Oak; Glenwood Modern Oak 116
Other Heating: propane
Location: South Central CT

Post Mon. Jan. 27, 2014 1:10 pm

I just wondered if when everything was cold it had any trouble drawing down instead of up, until the chimney warmed up

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wsherrick
Member
Posts: 3731
Joined: Wed. Jun. 18, 2008 6:04 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size
Location: High In The Poconos

Post Mon. Jan. 27, 2014 1:15 pm

PJT wrote:I just wondered if when everything was cold it had any trouble drawing down instead of up, until the chimney warmed up
It might, I hope not though.


Sunny Boy
Member
Posts: 12637
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post Mon. Jan. 27, 2014 2:12 pm

wsherrick wrote:
PJT wrote:I just wondered if when everything was cold it had any trouble drawing down instead of up, until the chimney warmed up
It might, I hope not though.
William,
You did a wonderful job explaining how to start your #6 in your YouTube videos.

Maybe Gekko or McGiever can explain as well how they cold-start their stoves. I be interested to hear if there's any difference in procedure for cold-starting a suspended firepot baseburner with such a low back pipe outlet. Does the flue pipe need to be warmed first, or are they so air-tight it doesn't matter?

Paul
So many stoves - so few chimneys. I must be coal-stone crazy.

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scalabro
Member
Posts: 2815
Joined: Wed. Oct. 03, 2012 9:53 am
Baseburners & Antiques: 2 Crawford 40's, PP Stewart No. 14, Abendroth Bros "Record 40"
Coal Size/Type: Stove / Anthracite.
Other Heating: Oil fired, forced hot air.
Location: Southwick Massachusetts

Post Mon. Jan. 27, 2014 4:44 pm

We'll guy's it's going to be a learning process for me, as I only have but 1&1/2 seasons running my MKII.

My chimney routinely pegs my Bacharach draft gauge @ .12, so I know I at least get that and probably higher because when I measure it the needle slams hard on the end of the scale.

Also when the MKII is down for cleaning a cigar reveals a draft with no fire at all, so I think I'll be OK.

I plan on using the "Cowboy" charcoal and just two ounces of kerosene to start her up.....just like Obi-Wan!

Now I just wish we would get a couple of 30# days so I can shut down the MK II and swap 'em out :mrgreen:
Last edited by scalabro on Mon. Jan. 27, 2014 5:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

stovehospital
Member
Posts: 222
Joined: Sat. Jun. 25, 2011 7:00 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: 250 stoves in barns
Stove/Furnace Model: #6 Herald baseheater

Post Mon. Jan. 27, 2014 5:06 pm

Cold start. If you are in a hurry you can use some newspaper then some lump charcoal. The trick is to not poke it. Just light it and leave the bottom door open for 5 minutes. The you can add about 3-5 " of coal and leave the bottom door open for 5 minutes. Add more coal and close the bottom door. Adjust the stove to0 what you want and see you in several hours.

User avatar
scalabro
Member
Posts: 2815
Joined: Wed. Oct. 03, 2012 9:53 am
Baseburners & Antiques: 2 Crawford 40's, PP Stewart No. 14, Abendroth Bros "Record 40"
Coal Size/Type: Stove / Anthracite.
Other Heating: Oil fired, forced hot air.
Location: Southwick Massachusetts

Post Tue. Jan. 28, 2014 10:24 pm

Thanks for the tip Emery....looks like Saturday morning she will be hooked up and running!
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Craw4
Member
Posts: 26
Joined: Wed. Feb. 13, 2013 1:28 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford #4, Champion Oak 116
Coal Size/Type: Stove
Location: Central NY

Post Wed. Jan. 29, 2014 8:07 am

Can't wait to see how you like the new girl..

Sunny Boy
Member
Posts: 12637
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace
Location: Central NY

Post Wed. Jan. 29, 2014 8:25 am

Thanks guys. Sounds relatively easy to start.

Gekko, That'll be a nice setting for that stove. ;)

And I like the use of the old kitchen range water boiler as a coal scuttle and stove tool bin. :D Not sure your aware, but they were originally made to fit over two burners on a kitchen range and heat many gallons of water on laundry day. That should hold about twice as much coal as a regular sized coal scuttle.

Paul
So many stoves - so few chimneys. I must be coal-stone crazy.

wilsons woodstoves
Member
Posts: 316
Joined: Mon. Dec. 16, 2013 7:55 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood, Crawford, Magee, Herald, Others

Post Wed. Jan. 29, 2014 8:40 am

never owned a crawford of that style, have owned a glenwood 111 which I used two seasons than traded it for two cook stoves. wish I still owned the 111, great stove, the crawford is going to perform well . can hardly wait to see how you rate it to what you have been using. Well done patch on back pipe


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