My Glenwood #6 Is on the Way!

Learn the ins and outs of designs that date back to the turn of the last century. Whether you are looking to restore an antique stove or have questions about modern reproductions you'll find the answers to your questions here.
franco b
Site Moderator
Posts: 8426
Joined: Wed. Nov. 05, 2008 5:11 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: V ermont Castings 2310, Franco Belge 262
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Modern Oak 114
Coal Size/Type: nut and pea
Location: Kent CT

Post Fri. Jun. 07, 2013 12:32 pm

Just seal it with furnace cement like the rest of the stove is sealed, but first try a piece of 6 inch stove pipe on it for fit. You may need to alter it a bit.


User avatar
dlj
Member
Posts: 1267
Joined: Thu. Nov. 27, 2008 6:38 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters
Location: Monroe, NY

Post Fri. Jun. 07, 2013 1:05 pm

Smokeyja wrote:So I received the elbow. It's in great condition but the seam needs to be sealed . I'm thinking of welding it with silica bronze after I sand blast it . How would you normally seal these ? It is marked L.C. 115 USA on both sides . This mean anything to anyone?
I wouldn't weld that seam. Not a good geometry to make that elbow one piece in a cast iron. just take apart the two halves, sand blast and reassemble with furnace cement and the four bolts.

Just my 2 cents worth...

dj

User avatar
wsherrick
Member
Posts: 3731
Joined: Wed. Jun. 18, 2008 6:04 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size
Location: High In The Poconos

Post Fri. Jun. 07, 2013 4:27 pm

Don't weld it. Leave it the way it is.

User avatar
Smokeyja
Member
Posts: 1984
Joined: Mon. Nov. 21, 2011 6:57 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater, Richmond Advance Range, WarmMorning 414a x2
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite
Other Heating: none
Location: Richmond, VA.
Contact:

Post Fri. Jun. 07, 2013 9:33 pm

dlj wrote:
Smokeyja wrote:So I received the elbow. It's in great condition but the seam needs to be sealed . I'm thinking of welding it with silica bronze after I sand blast it . How would you normally seal these ? It is marked L.C. 115 USA on both sides . This mean anything to anyone?
I wouldn't weld that seam. Not a good geometry to make that elbow one piece in a cast iron. just take apart the two halves, sand blast and reassemble with furnace cement and the four bolts.

Just my 2 cents worth...

dj
I just really don't trust furnace cement that well. It's like every year it becomes brittle and breaks apart . Maybe your right though .
Josh http://www.stellarsmithing.com
-Glenwood #6 Base heater - Richmond Advance Range -2 Locke stove co. Warm Morning 414A -Deville express - wood parlour stove
Dance of the Blue Ladies --->http://youtu.be/KfzF47S7bFM?list=UUnshvG_vjY7CT9QKfNuB9dg
Mathew 6:33-34

User avatar
wsherrick
Member
Posts: 3731
Joined: Wed. Jun. 18, 2008 6:04 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size
Location: High In The Poconos

Post Fri. Jun. 07, 2013 10:02 pm

You have to get the right furnace cement. You have to get a good quality cement that has a fiber bonding agent in it. Such as Hercules or Hearthstone, both brands I have used and would recommend.

User avatar
Smokeyja
Member
Posts: 1984
Joined: Mon. Nov. 21, 2011 6:57 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater, Richmond Advance Range, WarmMorning 414a x2
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite
Other Heating: none
Location: Richmond, VA.
Contact:

Post Sat. Jun. 08, 2013 8:41 am

wsherrick wrote:You have to get the right furnace cement. You have to get a good quality cement that has a fiber bonding agent in it. Such as Hercules or Hearthstone, both brands I have used and would recommend.
Thanks for that tip William! I have been using rutlands . I am not a fan of their cement at all. I will order what you have suggested. Do prefer tube or can/bucket for your application?
Josh http://www.stellarsmithing.com
-Glenwood #6 Base heater - Richmond Advance Range -2 Locke stove co. Warm Morning 414A -Deville express - wood parlour stove
Dance of the Blue Ladies --->http://youtu.be/KfzF47S7bFM?list=UUnshvG_vjY7CT9QKfNuB9dg
Mathew 6:33-34

User avatar
wsherrick
Member
Posts: 3731
Joined: Wed. Jun. 18, 2008 6:04 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size
Location: High In The Poconos

Post Sat. Jun. 08, 2013 3:36 pm

Smokeyja wrote:
wsherrick wrote:You have to get the right furnace cement. You have to get a good quality cement that has a fiber bonding agent in it. Such as Hercules or Hearthstone, both brands I have used and would recommend.
Thanks for that tip William! I have been using rutlands . I am not a fan of their cement at all. I will order what you have suggested. Do prefer tube or can/bucket for your application?
Rutland cement, don't use it, if you have any at home throw it away. As far as the other goes I use the buckets because you need to stir it up well first. Also, the surfaces need to be perfectly clean before you put them together.

User avatar
Smokeyja
Member
Posts: 1984
Joined: Mon. Nov. 21, 2011 6:57 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater, Richmond Advance Range, WarmMorning 414a x2
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite
Other Heating: none
Location: Richmond, VA.
Contact:

Post Mon. Jun. 10, 2013 10:09 pm

wsherrick wrote:
Smokeyja wrote: Thanks for that tip William! I have been using rutlands . I am not a fan of their cement at all. I will order what you have suggested. Do prefer tube or can/bucket for your application?
Rutland cement, don't use it, if you have any at home throw it away. As far as the other goes I use the buckets because you need to stir it up well first. Also, the surfaces need to be perfectly clean before you put them together.
Same for the connection of pipe between the stove and elbow? Or should I try and use a small rope?

Here is a photo of the elbow .

Image
Josh http://www.stellarsmithing.com
-Glenwood #6 Base heater - Richmond Advance Range -2 Locke stove co. Warm Morning 414A -Deville express - wood parlour stove
Dance of the Blue Ladies --->http://youtu.be/KfzF47S7bFM?list=UUnshvG_vjY7CT9QKfNuB9dg
Mathew 6:33-34


User avatar
nortcan
Member
Posts: 3080
Joined: Sat. Feb. 20, 2010 3:32 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Stuart,Peterson/ Grander
Stove/Furnace Model: Sunnyside/ Golden Bride
Location: Qc Canada

Post Tue. Jun. 11, 2013 6:13 pm

I certainly would use small rope gasket around it : never crack, easy and clean to install and dis-install...

User avatar
dlj
Member
Posts: 1267
Joined: Thu. Nov. 27, 2008 6:38 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Vermont Castings Resolute
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood Baseheater #6
Coal Size/Type: Stove coal
Other Heating: Oil Furnace, electric space heaters
Location: Monroe, NY

Post Tue. Jun. 11, 2013 11:00 pm

Nortcan uses gaskets on everything... Be careful though if you decide to go that way, the flanges have to fit - OD on one end and ID on the other...

dj

PJT
Member
Posts: 400
Joined: Fri. Jan. 06, 2012 11:11 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Magee Royal Oak; Glenwood Modern Oak 116
Other Heating: propane
Location: South Central CT

Post Thu. Jun. 13, 2013 9:07 pm

I have an elbow just like that came with my Modern oak 116...it has several cracks all the way through so you can see daylight...is it possible to repair by brazing or welding?

User avatar
Smokeyja
Member
Posts: 1984
Joined: Mon. Nov. 21, 2011 6:57 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater, Richmond Advance Range, WarmMorning 414a x2
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite
Other Heating: none
Location: Richmond, VA.
Contact:

Post Tue. Jun. 25, 2013 9:22 am

PJT wrote:I have an elbow just like that came with my Modern oak 116...it has several cracks all the way through so you can see daylight...is it possible to repair by brazing or welding?
Yes . Nickle or silica bronze. If you would like me take a look at it send me some photos through my website under "contact me " and ill tell you whether or not its salvageable . I can fix it too if it is .
Josh http://www.stellarsmithing.com
-Glenwood #6 Base heater - Richmond Advance Range -2 Locke stove co. Warm Morning 414A -Deville express - wood parlour stove
Dance of the Blue Ladies --->http://youtu.be/KfzF47S7bFM?list=UUnshvG_vjY7CT9QKfNuB9dg
Mathew 6:33-34

User avatar
Smokeyja
Member
Posts: 1984
Joined: Mon. Nov. 21, 2011 6:57 pm
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood #6 baseheater, Richmond Advance Range, WarmMorning 414a x2
Coal Size/Type: Nut / Anthracite
Other Heating: none
Location: Richmond, VA.
Contact:

Post Sat. Sep. 07, 2013 1:53 pm

Ok so I started restoring the elbow and I'm getting to the point that I can hook the 6 up .
image.jpg
Cleaned outside
Muriatic acid does wonders ! As you can see a few post above the rust
image.jpg
image.jpg
image.jpg
Josh http://www.stellarsmithing.com
-Glenwood #6 Base heater - Richmond Advance Range -2 Locke stove co. Warm Morning 414A -Deville express - wood parlour stove
Dance of the Blue Ladies --->http://youtu.be/KfzF47S7bFM?list=UUnshvG_vjY7CT9QKfNuB9dg
Mathew 6:33-34

top top
Member
Posts: 444
Joined: Sat. Apr. 13, 2013 5:40 am
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Kodiac Hand Fired with hopper.

Post Mon. Sep. 09, 2013 3:50 am

Smokeyja wrote:
Muriatic acid does wonders ! As you can see a few post above the rust
I'm sure you know this but thought it worth mentioning. Be sure to cook it in hot water and baking soda to kill the acid, otherwise it will continue to rust away. The hot water expands the metal opening the pores so the soda can get inside where the acid is hiding.

FYI for future use, for a better way to clean up small metal parts refer to Michael Faraday's theory of electrolysis. Here are some cast iron grates I restored using that method. My rectifier outputs 48 volts @ 27 amps so the process goes pretty quick. You can use something much smaller, it just takes a little longer. No need to deal with acid and the problems it brings.
Attachments
rust removal 001 [640x480].jpg
rust removal 004 [640x480].jpg

User avatar
dcrane
Verified Business Rep.
Posts: 3115
Joined: Sun. Apr. 22, 2012 9:28 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Crane 404
Location: Duxbury, MA./Hanson MA./Brockton, MA

Post Mon. Sep. 09, 2013 4:40 am

top top wrote:
Smokeyja wrote:
Muriatic acid does wonders ! As you can see a few post above the rust
I'm sure you know this but thought it worth mentioning. Be sure to cook it in hot water and baking soda to kill the acid, otherwise it will continue to rust away. The hot water expands the metal opening the pores so the soda can get inside where the acid is hiding.

FYI for future use, for a better way to clean up small metal parts refer to Michael Faraday's theory of electrolysis. Here are some cast iron grates I restored using that method. My rectifier outputs 48 volts @ 27 amps so the process goes pretty quick. You can use something much smaller, it just takes a little longer. No need to deal with acid and the problems it brings.
Ya Umm... I need more info on your set up (photo's and htf I set it up and what components I need)... make a thread please or PM me the specifics as I need to do this soon!


Post Reply

Return to “Antiques, Baseburners, Kitchen Stoves, Restorations & Modern Reproductions”