Mcclary Cook Stove

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Keepin' Warm
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Post by Keepin' Warm » Mon. Nov. 19, 2012 3:08 pm

I was referred to this site by a moderator over at Hearth.com as I'm seeking information on what he feels may be a coal-fired cook stove as opposed to wood which I thought it was due to the type of dampers it has. There are recent posts at that site under my username (Keepin' Warm) which have pictures of the stove. Might somebody here know if this is designed for coal? Thanks for your interest.

Rob

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Cook stove.jpg
.JPG | 303.4KB | Cook stove.jpg


 
franco b
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Post by franco b » Mon. Nov. 19, 2012 6:05 pm

Some pictures of the fire box are needed. The principal difference on a coal stove is that it has a movable grate to clear the ash.

 
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Post by I'm On Fire » Mon. Nov. 19, 2012 7:19 pm

Yeah, I'm not seeing a shaker handle or anything to clear the ashes. It may be on the inside. More pics from all angles and inside and out would help. :)

 
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Post by Keepin' Warm » Mon. Nov. 19, 2012 7:26 pm

Thanks for your reply.
Here you go. These should give you a good idea of what it looks like. :)

Rob

Attachments

McClaryFirebox2.jpg
.JPG | 144.1KB | McClaryFirebox2.jpg
LowerFireboxDamper.jpg
.JPG | 198.7KB | LowerFireboxDamper.jpg
LowerDamper(open).jpg
.JPG | 176KB | LowerDamper(open).jpg
UpperFireboxDamper.jpg
.JPG | 185.8KB | UpperFireboxDamper.jpg

 
franco b
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Post by franco b » Mon. Nov. 19, 2012 7:35 pm

Coal stove it is but I do not see the ends of the grates to attach a shaker handle.

 
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Post by I'm On Fire » Mon. Nov. 19, 2012 7:45 pm

Could that be it in the last picture? Looks almost like something goes in that space in the center.

 
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Post by Keepin' Warm » Mon. Nov. 19, 2012 9:07 pm

franco b wrote:Coal stove it is but I do not see the ends of the grates to attach a shaker handle.
Is this what you were looking for? :roll:
This is what is behind the left hand front door of the stove. Behind the right hand door is a water tank on top and a storage space below.
I never had a clue it was a coal stove and I rather doubt the previous owner did either but as far as I know he fired it with wood. :o We're a long way from a coal supply and have no end of wood! I doubt I'll ever burn it out using wood. :) These stoves were made in either Montreal or Toronto back in the day. It has a model and serial number but at this point I have no clue how to interpret them.

I forgot to mention that I was told the dark square above the shakers is removable so you can load the firebox from the front although I don't use it that way. The box is 8" x 12" x 16" so I feed it from the top.

Rob

Attachments

FireboxFront.jpg
.JPG | 159.1KB | FireboxFront.jpg
Last edited by Keepin' Warm on Tue. Nov. 20, 2012 10:48 am, edited 2 times in total.


 
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Post by Keepin' Warm » Mon. Nov. 19, 2012 9:43 pm

I'm On Fire wrote:Could that be it in the last picture? Looks almost like something goes in that space in the center.
The last picture is of the upper damper near the stove top but on the left left hand side, not the front of the stove. The object in the center is a small lever to operate the damper slide.

Rob

 
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Post by Poconoeagle » Mon. Nov. 19, 2012 9:50 pm

in the 140.75KB pic of the grates, there should be a way to "shake'"....ROCK side to side those three grates so as to allow the ash to drop down into the ash pan area. usually all three grates shake at the same time via interconecting gearing on one end of them and thus a square drive stub sticks out somewhere and allows you to slide a handle on and move them ....

 
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Post by Keepin' Warm » Tue. Nov. 20, 2012 11:16 am

Poconoeagle wrote:in the 140.75KB pic of the grates, there should be a way to "shake'"....ROCK side to side those three grates so as to allow the ash to drop down into the ash pan area. usually all three grates shake at the same time via interconecting gearing on one end of them and thus a square drive stub sticks out somewhere and allows you to slide a handle on and move them ....
FYI, the stubs are triangular, not square and are interconnected. It's not that easy to see in the photo.

Rob

 
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Post by SteveZee » Thu. Nov. 22, 2012 10:39 am

Yep it's set up for coal and wood actually. It doesn't have anything to do with the air control vents you photographed, they are the same for wood or coal. It is the bar grates below that rotate with that handle. That's what give it the ability to burn coal. Those are actually combination wood/coal grates. Without those, it's wood only but with them, you can burn either. If you were to burn coal with it long term, I would add some refractory to the sides of your firebox, but since you plan to use wood and maybe occasionally coal, I'd just leave it as is.

 
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Post by Keepin' Warm » Fri. Nov. 30, 2012 12:13 pm

Thanks for your help. :)
I've been away from this site for about a week and just read your post.
I think it's possible that this particular stove may have been sold as a combination coal/wood unit but I have no way of knowing that without access to McClary publications. They were owned by GSW (General Steel Wares) but so far I've had no luck finding printed information on this particular model.

Rob

 
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Post by Rob R. » Fri. Nov. 30, 2012 12:58 pm

Nice looking stove. It has everything it needs to burn coal, if you can locate some we will walk you through it.

 
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Post by ddbarnes21forever » Wed. Dec. 05, 2012 12:04 am

Hi I am a new member. Just registered today. I saw your posting with the photos of your Royal Charm and I was excited because I just purchased a McClary Royal Charm in mint condition from some friends who have owned it for more than 25 years. They bought it from a mutual friend who owned and used it for many years also. I have no idea how old it is but mine is definite the same model as yours. Do you know the year of your model? Name is Barney

 
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Post by SteveZee » Wed. Dec. 05, 2012 7:30 am

I don't know the exact year of your stove but the style indictates a stove from the late 40s -50's period with the sheet metal white surround. Cookstoves or ranges like my Glenwood were cast iron with no sheetmetal surroundings and instead were enameled or polished with nickel trim. Mine dates from about 1913-through the 1920's and was called the modern series because they had done away with allot of the ornate castings. Generally speaking, the more ornate cast ranges were earlier still from the 1880s-1910.


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