My "New" Glenwood Modern Oak 116

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wsherrick
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Post Sun. Jan. 06, 2013 2:23 am

An easy way to tighten up your windows rather than butcher the house is to have interior storm windows made. You just put them in on the inside and take them down in the Spring. It's an easy and effective way to have your cake and eat it too.


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SteveZee
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Post Sun. Jan. 06, 2013 8:14 am

wsherrick wrote:An easy way to tighten up your windows rather than butcher the house is to have interior storm windows made. You just put them in on the inside and take them down in the Spring. It's an easy and effective way to have your cake and eat it too.
I was just looking at those William. Simple and relatively cheap too compared to the outside models. They make them now (Outside) that stay on permanently and have swap out screens. They are pricey though. The inside seem easy and are simple hook and loop.

Was down to 3° this morning and the house was really toasty! The differance is it was close to 30° during the day.

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Post Sun. Jan. 06, 2013 8:33 am

SteveZee wrote:
wsherrick wrote:An easy way to tighten up your windows rather than butcher the house is to have interior storm windows made. You just put them in on the inside and take them down in the Spring. It's an easy and effective way to have your cake and eat it too.
I was just looking at those William. Simple and relatively cheap too compared to the outside models. They make them now (Outside) that stay on permanently and have swap out screens. They are pricey though. The inside seem easy and are simple hook and loop.

Was down to 3° this morning and the house was really toasty! The differance is it was close to 30° during the day.
Do you have any photos or links? That sounds interesting to me as
Well.

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SteveZee
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Post Sun. Jan. 06, 2013 11:15 am

Josh, Here's a couple links that I was looking at for the inside style. These are Definitely the way to go to maintain the historical integrety. Also they are easy to use and work well too according to the R factor info. The larger the dead air space you can make the better but that need an inch of set in space. Should work well for me as the sills or is it casements? are fairly deep.

http://www.downeastinteriorstorms.com/

http://www.larsondoors.com/storm_windows/products ... r_windows/

There are also a couple of kits that sell the magnetic strips in rolls and the outside material that you cut to size. Then you buy the plexy or pvc panels to make your own. These are about $200 for enough to do 7 -3x4 average sized windows. You still have the cost of the panels though.

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SteveZee
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Post Mon. Jan. 07, 2013 11:35 am

echos67 wrote:625* is starting to get up there, the highest I have had mine was 550* and I think it was DJ that ran his in the 700* plus for quite a while :D.

I bet you would notice a huge difference if those windows were replaced, not to mention it is quieter inside the house as well.
These are for you Keith ;) From the other day when it was -5°. The magnetic was siding down the stove. It has a thin wire to keep it up there. ;) That's as hot as I ever ran the stove. The sweetspot is in the 350° to 500° range on this stove. It likes to hang right around 450° for nice long burns and no ash bridging or klinker probs. By the way, the stack temp was still under 200° even at 625°
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echos67
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Post Mon. Jan. 07, 2013 6:17 pm

Thank you Steve, I may have to borrow your thin wire idea :D that is definitely impressive to have that heat and low flue temps like that !

Good thing you have that new Christmas laptop otherwise the stove would have melted you and the desktop :lol: .

What are you using on your flue seams, everything I try I don't have a lot of luck with it prior to the mpd. The black rtv doesn't stand up to the heat, the cement gets brittle and breaks out.

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SteveZee
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Post Mon. Jan. 07, 2013 8:21 pm

Keith, You're not kiddin, my face feels like it's got a windburn on the side that faced the stove. :lol:

I used this stuff called Hi Temp Pipe Joint Compound. You're right though, most everything seems to get brittle. I just connected the pipes, screwed em and slabbed some on round the joint. Whether or not it works or not I can't swear to it. The duravent pipes fit pretty tight as is.

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SteveZee
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Post Mon. Jan. 14, 2013 9:21 am

wsherrick wrote:An easy way to tighten up your windows rather than butcher the house is to have interior storm windows made. You just put them in on the inside and take them down in the Spring. It's an easy and effective way to have your cake and eat it too.
Here's a couple pix of those indoor storm windows William was talking about. They work great if you measure correctly. Simple friction fit and almost like a double pane with two dead zones of air as they have the film on both sides. Helps the 116 (just to stay on topic) :D
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wsherrick
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Post Thu. Jan. 17, 2013 7:55 pm

Excellent Steve. I wish more people displayed such sensitivity and respect for the irreplaceable nature of homes such as yours.

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Post Thu. Jan. 17, 2013 8:40 pm

SteveZee wrote:They work great if you measure correctly.
Yeah, easy for you to say. They look great Steve and the workmanship is beautiful.

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echos67
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Post Thu. Jan. 17, 2013 9:11 pm

First I saw this Steve, I'm sure they are making a large difference if you have enough of them installed.

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Post Thu. Jan. 17, 2013 10:59 pm

wsherrick wrote:Excellent Steve. I wish more people displayed such sensitivity and respect for the irreplaceable nature of homes such as yours.
Ditto! The guy who bought my family homestead has been busily ripping out all the old plaster walls and replacing them with sheetrock. He ripped out all the 2 over 2 windows and the old storms some time ago....circa 1875 house

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wsherrick
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Post Thu. Jan. 17, 2013 11:10 pm

PJT wrote:
wsherrick wrote:Excellent Steve. I wish more people displayed such sensitivity and respect for the irreplaceable nature of homes such as yours.
Ditto! The guy who bought my family homestead has been busily ripping out all the old plaster walls and replacing them with sheetrock. He ripped out all the 2 over 2 windows and the old storms some time ago....circa 1875 house
I'll make no bones about this issue. Some people have no business buying an old house, period. When you buy the house you buy the era in which it was built. If you have no respect for or the intelligence to understand what these houses represent, then buy something else. I have seen so much destruction in the name of, "rehabbing," "modernizing," etc. After the damage is done then there is no fixing it, ever. The intrinsic value of the house is lost forever.
If you want a modern house, buy a modern house. Leave the few remaining specimens of our shared Heritage alone.

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SteveZee
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Post Fri. Jan. 18, 2013 8:37 am

franco b wrote:
SteveZee wrote:They work great if you measure correctly.
Yeah, easy for you to say. They look great Steve and the workmanship is beautiful.
Richard, I only say that because I made the incredibly rookie mistake of forgetting to add 3" for the tape measure body on one of the windows! :oops: I don't usually admit that. :lol:

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Post Fri. Jan. 18, 2013 8:49 am

echos67 wrote:First I saw this Steve, I'm sure they are making a large difference if you have enough of them installed.
Keith, yeah they are working really well. Because they have the film on both sides, you have that dead air space within the frame itself and another between the storm window and the house window. R factor close to 3 (R2.8) which isn't bad considering a thermo pane window is R3.3. I put some 3" packing tape "tabs" also, to have something to pull them off when you remove them. Each one is marked for it's individual window although some are interchangeable with windows that were perfectly square. These were a 5 window test for the kitchen and My Mom's downstairs bedroom. Based on this, I will go ahead and make more for all the windows in the heating space.

It is currently 1° outside and the 116 is running at 450° , the range is 350°and we're at 70° downstairs. That is at least 50° less for the same temp as the last time it was this cold.


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