The Rolls Royce of Stoves-The Base Burner

Learn the ins and outs of designs that date back to the turn of the last century. Whether you are looking to restore an antique stove or have questions about modern reproductions you'll find the answers to your questions here.
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wsherrick
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Post Fri. Mar. 27, 2009 4:24 pm

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHJKziiOrvk [/youtube]

With all the talk about Chubbys and old stove design; I thought it would be neat to show this video about the best coal stove ever made. The Art Andes Baseburner. Someday I hope to have one of these when I have a house big enough to put it in. What do you think?


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acesover
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Post Fri. Mar. 27, 2009 6:05 pm

Nice, how much $$$ ?

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wsherrick
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Location: High In The Poconos

Post Fri. Mar. 27, 2009 9:17 pm

I don't know but it's probably pretty expensive. These are not only extremely functional, they are also works of art and as such command a big price tag.

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009to090
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Post Fri. Mar. 27, 2009 9:30 pm

I am seeing a price of almost $10,000 for it . :woot: Wow!!!
If it ain't broke, don't fix it!

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wsherrick
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
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Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size
Location: High In The Poconos

Post Sun. Mar. 29, 2009 1:26 am

That's a bit high. I would expect to pay top dollar for any model of an Andes Baseburner. They are simply the best ever built. This one is the top of the line. I guess somebody with that kind of money to spend will get it. Maybe he has a layaway plan :roll:

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SMITTY
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Post Sun. Mar. 29, 2009 1:57 pm

acesover wrote:Nice, how much $$$ ?
You know what they say: "If you have to ask,............... :shock:
The laws that forbid the carrying of arms...disarm only those who are
neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes. ...Such laws make things worse
for the assaulted and better for the assailants, they serve rather to
encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with
greater confidence than an armed man."

- Thomas Jefferson, quoting 18th century criminologist Cesare Beccaria in "On
Crimes and Punishment."

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DOUG
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Post Sun. Mar. 29, 2009 3:19 pm

So why aren't any of today's coal stoves using the base burner design concept? After doing some research on the 100 year old base burner design concept, it appears to be a pretty good idea. Is it the cost of the extra fabrication of all the extra weldment involved that makes the design cost prohibative? If it makes the coal burn so much longer and cleaner, it seems like that would be a good trade off. Unless it is physically impossible to make the design compact enough to break into the market for the extra cost and be comparable in size of today's hand fired coal stoves.

A simple non-ornate compact base burner coal stove maybe a thought for today's renewed interest in coal burning. I'm sure with all the technological developments we've made over the past 100 years, that we could come up with a better base burner. No? Any thoughts? :idea:

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SMITTY
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Other Heating: Oil fired Burnham boiler
Location: West-Central Mass

Post Sun. Mar. 29, 2009 3:42 pm

My guess is the cost. These days, it's all anyone cares about -- the bottom line.

Would be nice though. Anything that can help me burn 3 tons, or 2, instead of 5.25 would be great .............. besides the $6k for upstairs insulation! :shock:
The laws that forbid the carrying of arms...disarm only those who are
neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes. ...Such laws make things worse
for the assaulted and better for the assailants, they serve rather to
encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with
greater confidence than an armed man."

- Thomas Jefferson, quoting 18th century criminologist Cesare Beccaria in "On
Crimes and Punishment."


Jeddbird
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Post Sun. Mar. 29, 2009 4:23 pm

DVC500_at_last wrote:I am seeing a price of almost $10,000 for it . :woot: Wow!!!
Nice looking stove and I'm sure it heats well but $10,000.00!!!
Too steep for my blood!

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wsherrick
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
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Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size
Location: High In The Poconos

Post Mon. Mar. 30, 2009 3:54 am

DOUG wrote:So why aren't any of today's coal stoves using the base burner design concept? After doing some research on the 100 year old base burner design concept, it appears to be a pretty good idea. Is it the cost of the extra fabrication of all the extra weldment involved that makes the design cost prohibative? If it makes the coal burn so much longer and cleaner, it seems like that would be a good trade off. Unless it is physically impossible to make the design compact enough to break into the market for the extra cost and be comparable in size of today's hand fired coal stoves.

A simple non-ornate compact base burner coal stove maybe a thought for today's renewed interest in coal burning. I'm sure with all the technological developments we've made over the past 100 years, that we could come up with a better base burner. No? Any thoughts? :idea:
I've often asked myself the same question. Even the regular stoves of yesteryear (1880-1920) are better built than most if not all of the new designs with a lot of thought put into the everyday use and maintenance of the stove. As complicated and ornate as the Andes Baseburner is; I guarantee that it is designed to be easily assembled and taken apart for routine cleaning and maintenance. Wear parts such as firepots and grates are easily removed for repair or replacement for example. That's why they are still around after a century or more. I firmly believe that if someone were to design a modern version of a baseburner or cylinder stove that was airtight and yet had the beauty and functionality of the good stoves that used to be made,even if they cost a little more, people would snap them up and the other stove makers would then be forced to advance away from the 1970's box stove concept that has been the rule since the stove revival some 30 odd years ago. Just my 2 cents worth.

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Freddy
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Post Mon. Mar. 30, 2009 6:13 am

If you ever make it to central Maine, make sure to stop by Bryants stove shop. http://bryantstove.com

They have one particular old coal stove that makes this under burner look like a toy. The one they have is about 7 feet tall, 3 1/2 feet around. It has too many mica windows to count. a firepot that must hold over 100 pounds, and....they use it for heat! There's nickle trim all over....ohhhh, you'd have to go see it. During the summer they have a museum...dolls, circus stuff, small steam engines. You can spend a few hours drooling over the 100's of stoves.
Orrington, Maine
Fred

"If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all".

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wsherrick
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: Glenwood Base Heater, Crawford Base Heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Crawford Base Heater, Glenwood, Stanley Argand
Coal Size/Type: Chestnut, Stove Size
Location: High In The Poconos

Post Sun. Apr. 05, 2009 2:02 am

Freddy wrote:If you ever make it to central Maine, make sure to stop by Bryants stove shop. http://bryantstove.com

They have one particular old coal stove that makes this under burner look like a toy. The one they have is about 7 feet tall, 3 1/2 feet around. It has too many mica windows to count. a firepot that must hold over 100 pounds, and....they use it for heat! There's nickle trim all over....ohhhh, you'd have to go see it. During the summer they have a museum...dolls, circus stuff, small steam engines. You can spend a few hours drooling over the 100's of stoves.
Thanks for posting the web site. I have always wanted to do a vacation visit to upper New England. When I go I will make a point to stop at Bryant Stove Shop as well as Barnstable where I got my Stove from. The stove you describe must be impressive indeed and why would you be surprised that they use it. If you have the best you might as well use it as it was intended to be used. ;)

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dlj
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Post Mon. Apr. 20, 2009 7:13 pm

These are really nice stoves. I'm going to have my old base burner up and running for this coming winter (the whole reason why I'm selling my nice little vermont castings coal stove).

A question I have about installing these older stove. In the past when I ran this stove, I only used a manual damper. But I'm reading on these forums about using a manometer. Would this also be recommended on one of these older stoves? Would you install them with both a manual and modern manometer?

Any thoughts on this?

dj

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Poconoeagle
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Post Mon. Apr. 20, 2009 7:21 pm

Hey there DJ, The manometer is actually the measuring device that shows how much suction the chinmey is drawing. I believe what you are questioning is a barometric dampner which is a device that swings open and closed thus MATAINing a constant draft on the stove and enabling a even consistant burn. They are most beneficial in a stove that is rather airtight and finely adjustable.
"Do it Right the First Time" dont leave it for the next guy, as YOU may be the Next guy!!

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oliver power
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Location: Near Dansville, NY

Post Mon. Apr. 20, 2009 8:14 pm

DOUG wrote:So why aren't any of today's coal stoves using the base burner design concept? After doing some research on the 100 year old base burner design concept, it appears to be a pretty good idea. Is it the cost of the extra fabrication of all the extra weldment involved that makes the design cost prohibative? If it makes the coal burn so much longer and cleaner, it seems like that would be a good trade off. Unless it is physically impossible to make the design compact enough to break into the market for the extra cost and be comparable in size of today's hand fired coal stoves.

A simple non-ornate compact base burner coal stove maybe a thought for today's renewed interest in coal burning. I'm sure with all the technological developments we've made over the past 100 years, that we could come up with a better base burner. No? Any thoughts? :idea:
We've had round oak, round oak duplex, one simular to the round oak duplex(made by tenessee stove works), and other full cast iron stoves. They were all good old stoves. As far as efficiency & control, I'll take my HITZERS over the older stoves any day. The worst stove I recall ever having is a Ben Franklin wood stove/fireplace.


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