An article (pics) of Early Anthracite Stove History

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Hoytman
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Post by Hoytman » Wed. Sep. 11, 2019 3:28 pm

Check this out. May be the earliest anthracite stove, but I can't say for sure.

https://stovehistory.blogspot.com/2014/01/jordan- ... es-in.html

 
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mntbugy
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Coal Size/Type: stove and nut and some bit
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Post by mntbugy » Wed. Sep. 11, 2019 4:01 pm

Professor Howell Harris blogs are informative if your a stove junkie.

 
Hoytman
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Post by Hoytman » Wed. Sep. 11, 2019 4:46 pm

I don't own but two stoves...but it appears I've become at the least a "reading about stove's" junkie. LOL!

 
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Post by gardener » Thu. Dec. 24, 2020 10:10 am

This part really caught my attention.
[Mott] wanted, he said, to work out how anthracite below the two-inch size later known as “egg,” down through “chestnut” and “pea” at least as far as “buckwheat,” and even including the unsaleable waste below a quarter-inch in size later known as “rice,” “barley,” and “culm,” could be exploited as a cheap source of fuel for the urban poor [p. 140].

Early anthracite users preferred to burn large sizes on their grates and stoves – lumps the size of a fist, or even larger, which would later be termed “broken” or “steamboat” coal, the next sizes up from egg, and even more expensive. Small coal did not burn well or at all in most of the appliances available at the time, and was accordingly either left in the mines, discarded en route to market -- even being used for landfill to extend Manhattan's waterfront out into the Hudson and East Rivers – or sold off very cheaply.
Wow! used as landfill
If Mott could create a demand for it he would also, of course, be making a business opportunity for himself, and not just as a stove maker. He had certainly achieved his breakthrough by 1835, when he scored a commercial coup by buying cheaply mountains of discarded coal waste from the Schuylkill Navigation Company's yards in West Philadelphia, and shipping it to New York, where it now found a ready sale, and enabled Mott to make money twice over, by providing his customers with their fuel as well as with the appliances in which to burn it.
funny, 'mountains of discarded coal waste'
If I read that correctly, prior to late 1840s, any size under 2 inches was discarded?


 
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Sunny Boy
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Post by Sunny Boy » Thu. Dec. 24, 2020 11:27 am

If I only knew.....

Starting in the later 1800, until about WWII, this house was home and office to a succession of the village coal dealers.

When I tore up the carriage house floor to build a radiant heat concrete floor for workshop space, I found they had used coal fines - mostly the size of rice & barley - as fill under the floor. It was at least a foot deep for that 24 by 34 foot area of the carriage and wood shop section.

Not knowing that there were stoves that could burn that size, my helper and I spent several days shoveling it into a wheel barrow and dumping it in low areas to build up the long driveway.

About 800 cubic feet, or roughly 20 tons, wasted. :oops:

Paul

 
gardener
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Post by gardener » Thu. Dec. 24, 2020 1:00 pm

Sunny Boy wrote:
Thu. Dec. 24, 2020 11:27 am
Not knowing that there were stoves that could burn that size, my helper and I spent several days shoveling it into a wheel barrow and dumping it in low areas to build up the long driveway.

About 800 cubic feet, or roughly 20 tons, wasted.
Considering how helpful to me you have been answering my many odd-ball questions on this forum, I forgive you. :angel:
Though I disagree that it is wasted coal, maybe its not being burned, but it continues to be used constructively. :clap:

 
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Post by gardener » Tue. Oct. 12, 2021 9:48 am

This Google document came up in my search results, "The Stove Industry in 1892".
Looks like it may be part of a larger publication or something someone is working on.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1lEXL0OHHf0SaT ... xtiv4/edit

Other remarks I have read in other books suggested a movement of the stove factories through the years, but none of them provided any details. This document seems to put some numbers to the states. I especially liked

"towards newly-industrializing small cities with low production costs"

"The industry was following its markets, towards the American rural heartland where consumers still had no practicable alternative to solid fuel for cooking and heating (with the partial exception of the kerosene cook-stove). It was also locating closer to its raw material sources, which were now overwhelmingly American, the earlier New England, Mid-Atlantic and even Midwestern industry’s dependence on imported Scotch Pig (iron) having ended."


update, a quick search, I found where it was linked from (Howell Harris)
https://stovehistory.blogspot.com/2021/07/the-sto ... ginal.html

 
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Pauliewog
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Post by Pauliewog » Tue. Oct. 12, 2021 4:30 pm

I talked to Howell a few times and he definitely has a wealth of knowledge on the stove industry.

Paulie


 
Hoytman
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Post by Hoytman » Wed. Oct. 13, 2021 5:23 pm


 
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mntbugy
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Coal Size/Type: stove and nut and some bit
Other Heating: Propain

Post by mntbugy » Wed. Oct. 13, 2021 6:14 pm

Willie you missed a few more.....

Buckwalter, Royersford,PA.
Raymond&Campbell, Middletown,PA

Plus 23+ more mom and pop stove makers.
Should be more than 300 all together.

Some mom's&pop's.
Bellfonte stove works,Bellfonte,PA
Glenrock stove works,Glenrock,PA
Sparks stove works,Sparks,MD
Conowingo stove works,Conowingo,MD

Just to name a few.
Last edited by mntbugy on Wed. Oct. 13, 2021 8:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

 
Hoytman
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Posts: 3186
Joined: Wed. Jan. 18, 2017 11:30 pm
Location: swOH near a little town where the homes are mobile and the cars aren’t
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 354
Coal Size/Type: nut coal
Other Heating: electric, wood, oil

Post by Hoytman » Wed. Oct. 13, 2021 7:19 pm

Yeah...I’m sure I did. I’ll defer to those of you with far more knowledge than I on this subject. That was one I happened to be looking for. I am surprised there were so many companies from Ohio. Then again it’s not such a big surprise given the history of Ohio.

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