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Coal boiler ID help...

Posted: Fri. Sep. 28, 2018 8:05 pm
by Unclesnake
Picked this up at a swap meet today.
date is 1943
I assume it's a wood/coal boiler? very small...

I took it apart for inspection.. everything looks good, I capped one end and put about 120lb compressed air to it... and it seems to be leak free.

I was thinking maybe it's a Humphrey ?

would appreciate any info or comments.
thanks,
Unclesnake.. (new guy)
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Re: Coal boiler ID help...

Posted: Fri. Sep. 28, 2018 8:07 pm
by Unclesnake
couple more
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Re: Coal boiler ID help...

Posted: Fri. Sep. 28, 2018 8:22 pm
by McGiever
Welcome to the forum.

You could do a Search here on "Bucket A Day" water heater.

Pressure testing with compressed air can be very dangerous...water pressure is much safer method.

Re: Coal boiler ID help...

Posted: Fri. Sep. 28, 2018 8:34 pm
by coaledsweat
120#? You're lucky nothing went wrong. It would have gone off like a fragmentation bomb. That said, it should be filled with water and then charged with air. Typically 30# is enough. Valve it off for 24 hours and if it holds pressure, it's good to go. No need for all that pressure, it's just to dangerous.

Re: Coal boiler ID help...

Posted: Fri. Sep. 28, 2018 8:37 pm
by Unclesnake
Thanks,
I did happen to find a picture of another one online...

Anyone recognize the name on the lid?

SEARS ??
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Re: Coal boiler ID help...

Posted: Fri. Sep. 28, 2018 8:42 pm
by Unclesnake
Looks slightly different
But has the clover leaf H emblem.
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Re: Coal boiler ID help...

Posted: Fri. Sep. 28, 2018 8:44 pm
by McGiever
Just a couple different foundry's made everybody's water heater...the hinged lid bore the name of the retailer that sold it.

Cloverleaf and H was the ASME welded pressure vessel certification seal or emblem.

Re: Coal boiler ID help...

Posted: Fri. Sep. 28, 2018 9:07 pm
by Unclesnake
McGiever wrote:
Fri. Sep. 28, 2018 8:44 pm


Cloverleaf and H was the ASME welded pressure vessel certification seal or emblem.
It does look similar to the ASME emblem...
But I am getting different info here: https://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=266644
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Re: Coal boiler ID help...

Posted: Fri. Sep. 28, 2018 9:10 pm
by Unclesnake
I was also thinking it might be an H for Hercules ...
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Re: Coal boiler ID help...

Posted: Fri. Sep. 28, 2018 9:22 pm
by Unclesnake
I did find an ASME cloverleaf H (H-code)

but it still has ASME in it...

Maybe they used just the H in 1943
for Heating vessel...
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Re: Coal boiler ID help...

Posted: Sat. Sep. 29, 2018 8:55 am
by McGiever
It is not seamless but is skillfully welded cast iron by a ASME Certified welder of that time period and with passing a physical pressure test to 300 psi for proving..

Re: Coal boiler ID help...

Posted: Sat. Sep. 29, 2018 7:25 pm
by Unclesnake
McGiever wrote:
Sat. Sep. 29, 2018 8:55 am
It is not seamless but is skillfully welded cast iron by a ASME Certified welder of that time period and with passing a physical pressure test to 300 psi for proving..
Interesting.
Do you know if there are channels inside or is it one open chamber with in/out ?

also,
which nipple is the IN ?
If I had to guess I'd say in from the bottom and out at the top ..... ??

Re: Coal boiler ID help...

Posted: Sun. Sep. 30, 2018 10:51 am
by McGiever
Unclesnake wrote:
Sat. Sep. 29, 2018 7:25 pm
Interesting.
Do you know if there are channels inside or is it one open chamber with in/out ?

also,
which nipple is the IN ?
If I had to guess I'd say in from the bottom and out at the top ..... ??
First, don't know...
Second, your guess is correct...these were rarely used with circ. pump...relied on gravity of thermosiphon