Electrical Advice Needed

This forum is for common products and questions such as chimney installations, CO detectors, coal bin designs and a variety of other general topics that do not fit into the other forums.
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traderfjp
Member
Posts: 1800
Joined: Wed. Apr. 19, 2006 10:32 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing 3
Location: New York

Post Fri. Sep. 19, 2008 10:44 pm

Update: I came home from HD today with some 1/2 conduit and fittings. I'm just going to cut one end of a heavy duty extension cord and run it out the wall and into the basement. The conduit will keep the extension cord dry. It'll be fine and simple as pie.
Disclaimer: I'm not an expert in any coal or plumbing related field. I only post my own experiences, research and common sense. If you choose to use any of the information in this post or any other post you do so at your own risk.

twainer
Member
Posts: 37
Joined: Mon. Sep. 08, 2008 8:18 am
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Bermuda (Chapee) solid fuel boiler
Coal Size/Type: bituminous lump
Other Heating: Natural gas boilers
Location: North Central WV

Post Mon. Sep. 22, 2008 11:15 am

Gee, I don't want to pour cold water on this, but up above there somewhere you said you wanted to replace the batteries in the ups with marine batteries. Don't do that! The problem will be when the power does fail and the big batteries get run down somewhat. They will start to charge when power returns only the ups won't be able to supply enough power to feed those big marine batteries and it will fail.
These ups units are fairly cheap these days because of the computer market--we all need them to keep the PC's from crashing every time the lights flicker. Demand has brought the price down, but it also has made the designs for the units very efficient to keep the costs down. Read that as just enough guts inside to charge the batteries they come with, no more.
I work in a place where we use hundreds of 1000 to 2000 watt ups units. They fail all the time. We use various brands, different batteries, etc. After a power outage, the electrical load on the protected circuits is about double the normal load due to all the batteries charging. This is when all our ups units fail--during the charge cycle from too much demand from the suddenly heavy load of a dead battery plus the normal load from the protected circuit.

If you need longer run time from your ups for the coal burner, get a bigger ups and maybe then you can park it up by the stove and avoid the wire going from upstairs to downstairs.


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traderfjp
Member
Posts: 1800
Joined: Wed. Apr. 19, 2006 10:32 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing 3
Location: New York

Post Mon. Sep. 22, 2008 11:28 am

Thanks for the advice. I have two options. Disable the charging circuit or use a car charger to charge the betteries bacck up when the electricity goes out. I bought a Smart UPS 1400 va. It's good for 900 watts. I have software that monitors the unit and you can even tell it that you are adding up to 10 batteries. I wonder how this unit could charge 10 battereies? The size UPS you suggest would cost me a small fortune. Do u know how to disable the charger?
Disclaimer: I'm not an expert in any coal or plumbing related field. I only post my own experiences, research and common sense. If you choose to use any of the information in this post or any other post you do so at your own risk.

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Yanche
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Posts: 3032
Joined: Fri. Dec. 23, 2005 12:45 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Alternate Heating Systems S-130
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Pea
Location: Sykesville, Maryland

Post Mon. Sep. 22, 2008 12:49 pm

There is no cheap reliable UPS for powering motors. Take a look for my post months ago. flue temperature sensor interlock device
Yanche
Alternate Heating Systems S-130
Stoker Boiler burning Anthracite Pea Coal

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