Vaccuum sealed basement?

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Onyx
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Post by Onyx » Sun. Sep. 03, 2023 3:25 pm

I have tried to research on my own but haven’t found a solid answer. My stove dealer didn’t have knowledge about my oil furnace, and who I’ve called for the furnace, knows nothing about the stove.

That being said, I have oil furnace on one side of the house, and Channing iii, through the chimney, on other side. I ran both systems without a hitch throughout the majority of the year. However, one night, my co2 detectors went off, and my wife calls 911. Fire dept comes in and clears the house, small detection. At that point, we have been less reliant on the stove.

I believe the solution to this is to add intake vents near both the furnace and the stove, because they’re fighting for oxygen. Is this correct? Is there anything else I could do to run both systems together?

Thanks.

 
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davidmcbeth3
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Post by davidmcbeth3 » Sun. Sep. 03, 2023 3:59 pm

Assuming your exhaust systems are A-OK with both appliances then its possible you get some backdraft between the appliances.

Adding a vent to one will likely solve the issue; you likely would not need 2.

These appliances on same floor? Any obstructions between the two ? How much Sq ft of the dwelling. If on different floors, how much sq ft on each ?

No need to put holes in your walls quite yet...as any brackdraft has not been measured or seen, right?

Use your windows as a vent....open see no issue, close see if issue presents itself.

Tell your wifey that CO2 is basically an inert gas .. your body can be effected by it through the respiratory CO2 feedback loop. The corrective action to take is to go outside and wait for husband to deal with it ... calling the gov't and allowing them into your house is never ever a good idea.

100% CO2 in the house will not harm anything non-living in the house.

First step is to check for any exhaust leaking...then the backdraft testing.

CO2 detectors are good but most have 5 yr lifespans..check manufacturer of device make sure its still good.

 
Onyx
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Post by Onyx » Wed. Sep. 06, 2023 8:31 pm

davidmcbeth3 wrote:
Sun. Sep. 03, 2023 3:59 pm
Assuming your exhaust systems are A-OK with both appliances then its possible you get some backdraft between the appliances.

Adding a vent to one will likely solve the issue; you likely would not need 2.

These appliances on same floor? Any obstructions between the two ? How much Sq ft of the dwelling. If on different floors, how much sq ft on each ?

No need to put holes in your walls quite yet...as any brackdraft has not been measured or seen, right?

Use your windows as a vent....open see no issue, close see if issue presents itself.

Tell your wifey that CO2 is basically an inert gas .. your body can be effected by it through the respiratory CO2 feedback loop. The corrective action to take is to go outside and wait for husband to deal with it ... calling the gov't and allowing them into your house is never ever a good idea.

100% CO2 in the house will not harm anything non-living in the house.

First step is to check for any exhaust leaking...then the backdraft testing.

CO2 detectors are good but most have 5 yr lifespans..check manufacturer of device make sure its still good.
1200 sqft and appliances are opposite sides of house, in finished basement. No obstructions, however, I will be adding a door by the oil furnace. I will also keep the closest windows open and try that, thanks.

 
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mozz
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Post by mozz » Wed. Sep. 06, 2023 8:38 pm

CO not CO2. Big difference. CO will kill you.


 
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Rob R.
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Post by Rob R. » Wed. Sep. 06, 2023 10:45 pm

Your stove is starved for air. Crack a window open a few inches.

 
waytomany?s
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Post by waytomany?s » Thu. Sep. 07, 2023 7:15 am

Can you show a picture of the setup?

 
xackley
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Post by xackley » Thu. Sep. 07, 2023 1:30 pm

In the spring when outside temps might be equal to the the exhaust temps of an idling stoker coal stove, you need to be carefully monitor the CO. Make sure you have a CO meter with a digital display. Every time you fill the hopper you press the button to view the highest reading. The highest reading should always be Zero. If not Zero, investigate.
The alarm should sound while the CO is still at a safe level, but open doors and windows. Unplug the CO meter and pull the battery. Plug the battery in and see current CO. Repeat until Zero. Close doors and windows, monitor CO level.
Odds are if your flue is clear and you stove is sealed to spec, just shut off the coal stove until the weather is cold.

A CO alarm is not like a gas leak, no need to call anyone, except maybe an hvac tech.

When my grandfather burned wood, he cut a 4 inch hole directly below the stove.

Don

 
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davidmcbeth3
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Post by davidmcbeth3 » Thu. Sep. 07, 2023 2:50 pm

xackley wrote:
Thu. Sep. 07, 2023 1:30 pm
SNIP - Make sure you have a CO meter with a digital display.

A CO alarm is not like a gas leak, no need to call anyone, except maybe an hvac tech.

Don
Mind telling us your model of CO detector, Don.

I agree with the need not to call anyone..you have a leak somewhere...depending on complexity of system one might have to call a HVAC guy.

These are the symtoms of CO exposure:
Chest pain.
Dizziness and weakness.
Fainting (loss of consciousness).
Loss of muscle coordination.
Mental confusion.
Severe headache.
Upset stomach, nausea and vomiting.

The level of CO that's at issue?
10-29 ppm CO: problems over long-term exposure; chronic problems such as headaches, nausea. 30-35 ppm CO: flu-like symptoms begin to develop, especially among the young and the elderly. 36-99 ppm CO: flu-like symptoms among all; nausea, headaches, fatigue or drowsiness, vomiting.

10-30 ppm will give chronic issues > 30ppm acute issues

What levels do CO detectors measure?
standard CO sensors will typically not alarm at levels below 30 ppm. Carbon monoxide alarms with ultra-sensitive detection, however, will indicate low levels of CO below 30ppm which may have health implications for those suffering from pre-existing conditions.

So choose a detector for your desires...not all are equal.


ASTM D3162-21 is a standard test method for CO and goes down to 0.5 ppm. One needs a spectrometer tho. I suppose some labs would test your air you send them..its not hard to capture LOL I do plan on getting such a spectrometer capable of running the test...will have to wait until I move to a new dwelling that will include the requirement for an out-house suitable for an organic laboratory
Last edited by davidmcbeth3 on Thu. Sep. 07, 2023 2:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.


 
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mozz
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Post by mozz » Thu. Sep. 07, 2023 2:52 pm

Never saw a digital readout be perfectly zero. I've had people over for Thanksgiving and the reading was going up, they sucked all the oxygen out of my house.

 
xackley
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Post by xackley » Thu. Sep. 07, 2023 4:16 pm

"Kidde Carbon Monoxide Detector, Plug In Wall with 9-Volt Battery Backup" is near my stove
Have 2 more in living area, just in case.

My detector sits at zero except when I start a motorcycle inside my ground level basement.

 
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davidmcbeth3
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Post by davidmcbeth3 » Thu. Sep. 07, 2023 5:11 pm

xackley wrote:
Thu. Sep. 07, 2023 4:16 pm
"Kidde Carbon Monoxide Detector, Plug In Wall with 9-Volt Battery Backup" is near my stove
Have 2 more in living area, just in case.

My detector sits at zero except when I start a motorcycle inside my ground level basement.
The UL-listed Kidde KN-COPP-3 Nighthawk has a seven-year life a

https://www.ebay.com/itm/285392877372?hash=item42 ... R4Cm8pfOYg

I had it .. replaced after 5 yrs ... they wear out. Now have :

https://www.ebay.com/itm/235162106038?epid=601991 ... BM3Lrtl85i

No led ppm display...just beeps...unit says detection limit is 70 ppm ... seems sucky LOL

Well, nice knowing yas !

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