Coal Bin Flooring

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traderfjp
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Posts: 1799
Joined: Wed. Apr. 19, 2006 10:32 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing 3
Location: New York

Post Thu. Jul. 10, 2008 5:50 pm

I'm building a coal bin that is 32ft.L x 8ft. W. and plan on using a Bobcat to load rice coal into the bin. I'll use a tarp to keep the coal dry. My dilemma is finding a floor that is inexpensive and durable.

One idea is to use outdoor carpeting. Cons: I couldn't drive over the carpet with the Bobact when loading the bin. However, I could roll out 6-8 feet at a time then drop the rice coal on the carpet that is laid out. I'd also use a sheet of plywood (as pictured) to section off the bin so the rice coal doesn't spill out all over the place and get run overed with the machine. I would fill one 8 ft. section then move the plywood back another 8 ft. and so on.

Another idea is to use a solid vinyl floor like Armstrong makes. I could find a remerant but it's solid vinyl so water couldn't pass through and that may cause problems I don't know.

I thought about using pressure treated ply with 4 x 4 posts underneath to keep the ply off the ground but the cost is very expensive.

Any lowcost alternatives or advice is appreciated.

Outdoor carpeting-140.00

Vinyl- 250.00

Plywood-450.00
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Disclaimer: I'm not an expert in any coal or plumbing related field. I only post my own experiences, research and common sense. If you choose to use any of the information in this post or any other post you do so at your own risk.

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Freddy
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Joined: Fri. Apr. 11, 2008 2:54 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 130 (pea)
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Reading piece o' junk in the barn (rice)
Coal Size/Type: Pea size, Superior, deep mined
Location: Orrington, Maine

Post Thu. Jul. 10, 2008 8:41 pm

You've got $840 worth of stuff listed....stuff that in 10 years will probably be needing replacement. A 4" concrete pad that size (make it 9 feet wide & set the blocks on it, ends up 8' inside) would be less than 4 yards of concrete, about $300. Add in rebar and you're up around $500. 324 cement blocks brings it to $824. Have rebar stick up from the slab, put the blocks down over and mortar in place. It would be a bunch of labor, but now you can drive on it and in ten yrs it will simply be ten years old. Yaaaa, it would probably run a bit more than $824, rebar's not cheap, but with the right amount I think a block wall would work and it would be cheaper than stack-um blocks.
How much coal are you planning on? Why not make it 10 feet wide and be able to have a truck dump into it?
Lot's to think about!

If you don't want a concrete pad, I'd make a solid gravel pad and use thick felt over the gravel. You can drive on it and it'll last for years. Around here paper mills throw it out now & then.
Orrington, Maine
Fred

"If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all".


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Scottscoaled
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Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 520, 700, Van Wert 800 GJ 61,53
Baseburners & Antiques: Magic Stewart 16, times 2!
Coal Size/Type: Lots of buck
Other Heating: Slant Fin electric boiler backup
Location: Malta N.Y.

Post Thu. Jul. 10, 2008 11:57 pm

Talk to your local paving contractor. If you pay full price it will be $1.25 per sq. ft. adjusted to your area. Sometimes they have a little left over. If they know they can clean their truck out,they may do your small area over several days for a considerable cost reduction. Scratch my back, ya know! :) Scott
I think a man does what he can, untill his destiny is revealed. Right now that is trying to sell my EFM plate boilers in 520 and 700 sizes.

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traderfjp
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Joined: Wed. Apr. 19, 2006 10:32 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing 3
Location: New York

Post Fri. Jul. 11, 2008 12:05 am

Freddy: It can be a permanent floor or when I go to sell the house I'll have problems plus it'll cost me well over 1500.00. I had two small sections by my pool poured 2 years ago and priced around and it cost me 700.00 and this is a much bigger area. Asphalt is too permanent too. Another alternative but not cheap would be cement board but I wouldn't be able to drive on it which really wouldn't be a problem.
Disclaimer: I'm not an expert in any coal or plumbing related field. I only post my own experiences, research and common sense. If you choose to use any of the information in this post or any other post you do so at your own risk.

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