Advice on Building a Simple Coal Bin???

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eddie
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Post Thu. Jun. 19, 2008 6:01 pm

I am switching to coal. I have a concrete floor in my basement. I only want the bin to hold 2 tons. Yes, I see from other posts that I can use 3/4" pressure treated plywood, 2X4's and I have some 2X6's. I have an idea for the sides (the 2X4" spaced vertically maybe 18" apart on the plywood. I can also attach the 2X4's to the ceiling joists. I need advise as to hold the bottom together because I understand the coal will put a lot of pressure on the sides at the bottom. I also want to keep things simple by not drilling into the concrete floor. How do I reinforce the sides on the bottom so the coal doesn't push out the sides. Do I have to also anchor the sides to the floor so the whole bin doesn't shift. I'm looking for a simple solution so that I can do this myself. Thanks!!!!!

eddie
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Post Thu. Jun. 19, 2008 6:34 pm

Also, how do I hold the boards together? Will 4" nails do?

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Richard S.
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Post Thu. Jun. 19, 2008 6:57 pm

Be sure to put the plywood on the inside of the bin. If you use a standard 16 inch studs on center bowing is not a problem. Simply anchor it to the floor with a few specialized anchor bolts for that purpose. You could also drill some holes in the concrete directly next to the stud on the floor and slide a few pieces of pipe or rebar into the whole. Even if you used the full height of 4 foot on piece of plywood its not going to exert that much pressure. You only have to start being concerned about it when you get into some serious weight like if your building a 6 foot wall you expect to put a lot of coal against.

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Freddy
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Post Thu. Jun. 19, 2008 8:01 pm

Is there a reason to use pressure treated plywood inside? I was planning on 3/4" regular, but I'll do whatever's needed.


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spc
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Post Thu. Jun. 19, 2008 8:06 pm

4 x 8 x 3 = 96 Cubic FT Approx. 2.4 tons
Depends on how wet your basement is, I would lay a thick piece of plastic on the floor where the bin will go.
Cut 4-2x4's laying flat to the footprint of the bin say 4'x8'. Screw 4'x8' sheet of plywood to 2x4's. Flip over & toe nail 2x4 studs to 2x4 plates that you screwed to the plywood. Plywood inside of walls but allow for some type of door/ slats to have access to the bin. The plywood bottom will hold studs from kicking out at the base without drilling into floor. Hope this helps.

eddie
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Post Thu. Jun. 19, 2008 8:08 pm

The way I understand it. There is water in coal when you get it and pressure treated wood will resist deterioration. Someboy correct me If i"m wrong because pressure treated is roughly 4 times the price of regular plywood. I would rather use the regular If I knew it would be okay.

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spc
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Post Thu. Jun. 19, 2008 8:17 pm

You could put a coat of oil on the plywood. I wouldn't use PT.

ken
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Post Thu. Jun. 19, 2008 8:22 pm

i plan on achoring a 2 X 8 treated to the floor to start with. attach studing , 16" apart. mount 2 X 4 to the 2 x 8 next to the studs and at the top to the floor joists. then 1/2" CDX 4 ply on the inside raised about 3/4" off the floor. :D


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gambler
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Post Thu. Jun. 19, 2008 9:14 pm

eddie wrote:The way I understand it. There is water in coal when you get it and pressure treated wood will resist deterioration. Someboy correct me If i"m wrong because pressure treated is roughly 4 times the price of regular plywood. I would rather use the regular If I knew it would be okay.
I used regular OSB on my bin and painted it with some $10 a gallon barn paint. I have only used it for one season but it still looks like new.

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vtec350
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Post Thu. Jun. 19, 2008 9:41 pm

You always want to have PT lumber against any concrete surface. Over time the moisture in the concrete will deteriorate the wood, why do things twice. Just use PT 2x6's along the concrete flooring and the rest can be Reg. 2x4 and OSB sides. That's why when they frame a house the sill plate is always PT lumber.

Dave

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Richard S.
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Post Thu. Jun. 19, 2008 10:47 pm

eddie wrote:The way I understand it. There is water in coal when you get it and pressure treated wood will resist deterioration. Someboy correct me If i"m wrong because pressure treated is roughly 4 times the price of regular plywood. I would rather use the regular If I knew it would be okay.
Regualar plywood will be fine, no particle board. Pressure treated is only needed in an outside environment that is going to be wet all the time. For that matter if you put it outside on blocks and painted it you'd still be good. Coal is wet but its not that wet and dries out pretty quick inside a basement as will the wood.

eddie
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Post Fri. Jun. 20, 2008 8:30 pm

Thanks for all the replies!!!!

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Richard S.
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Post Fri. Jun. 20, 2008 9:42 pm

Let me correct my post above, if you used regular plywood, painted it and it had roof you'd be fine. A drian hole in each corner would probably help as well but that is needed if you're really close to the breaker and t wont have chance to drain out before it gets to you.

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