oiling metal flue liner

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gardener
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Post By: gardener » Thu. Dec. 21, 2017 9:31 am

While reading through the manual from one DS Machine's products, their annual maintenance section had this entry:
"Clean inside of chimney liner at least once annually (in Spring). For longer life oil inside of liner with vegetable oil."
I did a search on here and so far only found references to spraying oil on bulk coal to keep the dust down.

Does anyone on here oil their metal flue liner?

If so,
what type of oil do you use?
how do you apply it?
do you leave the flue connected the appliance while doing this?

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Post By: franco b » Thu. Dec. 21, 2017 10:51 am

I don't see how oil could be gotten to the top of a chimney liner. The connecting pipes ,yes.

Coat the liner with the creosote from a wood fire to protect it. Start and end season with a wood fire.

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Post By: Lightning » Thu. Dec. 21, 2017 11:45 am

For what it's worth I oil the interior of my furnace after springtime clean out. I use motor oil and apply it with a paint brush. I wash out the stove pipe and put it in the attic, I don't normally oil the stove pipe but I might this spring.

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Post By: DENNIS BAUER » Thu. Dec. 21, 2017 1:07 pm

In the garage I normally clean the stove out and spray everything down with PB blaster or WD-40. Only issue is that it makes for a smokey first fire in the fall. In the house I just clean the stove down and leave it sit. It's in my kitchen and my house has AC running in the summer so the humidity is lower.
I am however curious what everyone does with there stainless chimney. I replaced the house chimney this summer and I also had single wall stainless made for both stoves to connect to the exterior chimney.

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Post By: gardener » Thu. Dec. 21, 2017 2:30 pm

franco b wrote:
Thu. Dec. 21, 2017 10:51 am
I don't see how oil could be gotten to the top of a chimney liner. The connecting pipes ,yes.
Coat the liner with the creosote from a wood fire to protect it. Start and end season with a wood fire.
How many fires?
I guess I assumed that they meant to use some sort of brush with a rag wrapped around it and insert from the top... curious if anyone does something like that.

Lightning wrote:
Thu. Dec. 21, 2017 11:45 am
I use motor oil and apply it with a paint brush. I wash out the stove pipe and put it in the attic, I don't normally oil the stove pipe but I might this spring.
Why motor oil, doesn't it have a lot of additives?
WOW! you wash out the pipe with water? wait, you said stove pipe, nevermind
How much stove pipe do you have?

DENNIS BAUER wrote:
Thu. Dec. 21, 2017 1:07 pm
In the garage I normally clean the stove out and spray everything down with PB blaster or WD-40. Only issue is that it makes for a smokey first fire in the fall. In the house I just clean the stove down and leave it sit. It's in my kitchen and my house has AC running in the summer so the humidity is lower.
I am however curious what everyone does with there stainless chimney. I replaced the house chimney this summer and I also had single wall stainless made for both stoves to connect to the exterior chimney.
Your garage setup, you spray the inside of the stove pipe/flex liner?



My chimney is 12 inch square clay tiles, but most of the fireplace inserts have 6 inch round exhausts.
Have thought of running stove pipe up to the first tile and sealing off.
I would like to try and use a flex liner as a first attempt, get some experience burning before I make major modifications.

The vegetable oil seems like a good idea, but how to apply it, and doesn't it go rancid?
I saw threads where people used mineral oil to spray on bulk coal, but does mineral oil burn well? or does it just get vaporized
Am going to send a begging email to DS Machines for them to elaborate, also see if I can download the manuals from their other products and see if they already explain it in one of those manuals.

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Post By: DENNIS BAUER » Thu. Dec. 21, 2017 2:33 pm

No I only spray down the stove. My single wall connecting the stove to the chimney I just cleaned like the rest of the chimney and left. Since it is all stainless now I'd like to try and keep everything operational for as long as possible.

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Post By: Lightning » Thu. Dec. 21, 2017 2:39 pm

gardener wrote:
Thu. Dec. 21, 2017 2:30 pm
Why motor oil, doesn't it have a lot of additives?
WOW! you wash out the pipe with water? wait, you said stove pipe, nevermind
How much stove pipe do you have?
I never considered the additives but I couldn't imagine them being detrimental to metal considering what the oil is used for :lol: I do wash out the stove pipe with the garden hose, outside. Then let it bake in the sunshine to dry thoroughly before storing. I even wash out the furnace with the hose in the basement after its completely cold of course. That sucker is CLEAN before applying a coat of oil.

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Post By: DENNIS BAUER » Sat. Dec. 23, 2017 9:25 am

Lightning wrote:
Thu. Dec. 21, 2017 2:39 pm
I never considered the additives but I couldn't imagine them being detrimental to metal considering what the oil is used for :lol: I do wash out the stove pipe with the garden hose, outside. Then let it bake in the sunshine to dry thoroughly before storing. I even wash out the furnace with the hose in the basement after its completely cold of course. That sucker is CLEAN before applying a coat of oil.
My only fear with used motor oil is this. A friend of mine uses a used oil boiler in his shop. To roof is covered in a fine rust from the metal in the oil after coming out of a motor. I guess since you are not using 1,000 gallons of oil like he does to heat the shop it won't hurt you.

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Post By: Lightning » Sat. Dec. 23, 2017 9:57 am

DENNIS BAUER wrote:
Sat. Dec. 23, 2017 9:25 am
My only fear with used motor
Oh no, I use a quart of new motor oil.

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Post By: DENNIS BAUER » Sat. Dec. 23, 2017 12:16 pm

Lightning wrote:
Sat. Dec. 23, 2017 9:57 am
Oh no, I use a quart of new motor oil.
Well disregard my post. Lol

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Post By: gardener » Fri. Jan. 05, 2018 12:57 pm

I ended up emailing DS Machine and they replied

"Our install crew applies the oil by running the poly brush to clean it,then you wrap a rag soaked in oil to the brush to coat the inside."

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Post By: gardener » Thu. Mar. 21, 2019 1:40 pm

I followed a link from a different thread to and found the following pertinent information, I'm not sure what type of oil is sweet oil, but I will leave out the lead:

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=Vq00AAAAMAAJ& ... &q&f=false
American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge, for ... 1830-61, Volume 8
page 67-68 of OBSERVATIONS ON THE USE OF ANTHRACITE COAL

6. To preserve anthracite stoves from corrosion and premature decay, they must be well taken care of when not in use.

Some of the products of combustion of anthracite coal, have a strong chemical action on iron. Those arising from the sulphur, more or less of which is usually present in fossil coal, and the salts of ammonia which are deposited on the interior of the smoke pipe, are especially destructive to iron. These substances, however, do not corrode iron when they are hot and dry; but when rendered liquid, or even merely humid by the presence of water, they act with great energy, and sometimes destroy sheet iron with great rapidity. Hence, long horizontal pipes should, as far as possible, be avoided, because, in the parts remote from the furnace, they condense moisture, and form a solution of the corrosive products of combustion. Also, at the close of the season of fires, the stove and pipe should be taken down and brushed clean, and if a white wash of lime with a mixture of fine white sand, be applied, it will contribute much to the durability of the apparatus. When thus taken care of, sheet iron stoves may be made to last many years. ...

The interior of a stove and pipe being thus prepared for standing through the summer without injury, the exterior surface may also be preserved from rust, by any method which will keep it dry. It is advisable, however, to rub it over with a cloth smeared with sweet oil (not linseed oil), to which has been added a little black lead, or the powder sold under the name of British lustre. A very thin coating is all that is required. The stove should finally be placed, for the summer, in a situation which is free from dampness. One who thus, at the close of every winter, puts his stove in readiness for another season, and in a state of preservation from injury during the summer, will find the practice highly conducive both to convenience and economy.

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Post By: CapeCoaler » Thu. Mar. 21, 2019 8:14 pm

“Sweet oil” is another term for olive oil. It’s derived from olives, a small, fatty fruit.

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Post By: coalnewbie » Thu. Mar. 21, 2019 10:41 pm

The best way to prevent corrosion issues is to keep the stove running all year. I do not need heat 4 months of the year and so I keep a 200w sump heater running in the summer for the smaller stoves and 300w heater running with the big stove. Last year, when it never stopped raining, none of my 5 operational stoves showed any sign of corrosion. Yes, I use a little extra power but I do not care, it's just easier this way. I never shut down before May 15 and light up Sept 15, regular as clockwork.

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