COAL BIN Pics

This forum is for common products and questions such as chimney installations, CO detectors, coal bin designs and a variety of other general topics that do not fit into the other forums.
PelletstoCoal
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Post Mon. Aug. 11, 2008 2:45 pm

Almost finished with outdoor coal bin, approx. 4x10 w/ gable 6', arch. shingles, dutchlap siding, hinged roof (2 places), eaves, soffit and coal gate. Gate needs to be redone, was in a hurry, coal was on its way and I needed to build gate within 10 -15 minutes. Pictures will be soon, just need to cap the eaves and outside corners. Will hold approx. 3.5 tons. Into it approx. 270.00 bucks. Not too bad to keep my coal dry. Pictures to follow.


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traderfjp
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Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing 3
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Post Mon. Aug. 11, 2008 2:55 pm

The weight of the coal will be pushing at the sdies of your coal bin. If you put the plywood on the outside of the studs the coal could loosen the fasteners you used to attach the plywood to the studs. The other way the plywood has no where to go but be pushed against the studs. That said I'm sure if you used enough screws it wouldn't matter.

Scott: When I first saw your pile of coal I thought you dug a hole, lined it with tarp material and then filled it in with coal. Much like a swiming pool.
Disclaimer: I'm not an expert in any coal or plumbing related field. I only post my own experiences, research and common sense. If you choose to use any of the information in this post or any other post you do so at your own risk.

ScottD
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Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Hearth Stoker
Location: Eastern Mass

Post Mon. Aug. 11, 2008 5:18 pm

traderfjp;
Does kind of look that way. I had a dump trailer and I lined the trailer with the tarp first so it wouldn't leak through. I laid another on the ground and dumped the whole thing, first tarp and all on the second tarp. If you notice, there are two tarps on the ground. Because of that it looks a little poofy on the sides and gives the allusion of being sunken in I guess. Had it there too long and having trouble growing the grass back again. :oops:

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traderfjp
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Post Mon. Aug. 11, 2008 5:46 pm

How did u move all that coal? Did any of it get crushed?
Disclaimer: I'm not an expert in any coal or plumbing related field. I only post my own experiences, research and common sense. If you choose to use any of the information in this post or any other post you do so at your own risk.

ScottD
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Post Mon. Aug. 11, 2008 6:48 pm

It's a long story and involves an agricultural grain hopper with a chute 18" off the ground (the source), a case backhoe with no brakes (the transfer), a 12'x8'x2' deep and 4' high dump trailer with no brakes(the destination), a hoe, 6 long hrs., and a 155 mile each way trip. That coal, trailer, and stove came in at over 10k lbs. Did I mention the no brakes on the trailer part yet :no1:
Last edited by ScottD on Mon. Aug. 11, 2008 7:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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davelikesbeer
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Stove/Furnace Make: Russo
Stove/Furnace Model: 1900 C
Location: Black Leather Chair

Post Mon. Aug. 11, 2008 7:17 pm

Here's my coal. The bin is located in an all block room in the basement under an enclosed side porch. The window goes out to the driveway, three inches above grade, where I load the coal in. The bin is 9 1/2 feet wide, 52 inches deep, and 48 high. It currently holds 4.5 tons of nut. The center sections easily removes in one foot increments all the way to the floor, so I can get inside as it goes down. The wall is made with rough cut lumber and old door frames. There are 4x4 posts on the floor, braced to the opposite wall. I checked each ton as I loaded it, and not even 1/2 inch of deflection at the top. I have plans to add another smaller section in front of this one to bring total capacity to 8 tons inside the house, all about 10 feet from the stove.

The pile is what is left after moving 4.5 tons into the house, and my brother Bob already took 1.5 tons. I want 3.5 more in the house. Bob gets 6.5 more, and my brother Mark gets 8. We should all be set for 2 years.
Attachments
coal binA.JPG
coal bin5A.JPG
coal3A.JPG
DAVE :love: :beer:

ScottD
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Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Hearth Stoker
Location: Eastern Mass

Post Mon. Aug. 11, 2008 9:07 pm

Dave;
How did you get the delivery behind your house? What size truck did they use?
Good luck with your stove, I saw it in another post. I almost got a Russo. It was a c85 I believe but it would have been to big for where I wanted to put it, on my main living floor, and it didn't have a blower. The guy selling it was 75 and didn't want to handle the ash and such anymore. He kept it in the basement and said it would roast you out if you kept it on the same floor you occupy. Even without the blower. Again, good luck!
Scott

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davelikesbeer
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Post Mon. Aug. 11, 2008 11:03 pm

The truck was 45 foot end dump tractor trailor. My yard goes all the way to the street behind me, so the truck drove in, backed up to the pad, dumped the load, and drove out the back driveway. He was not to thrilled to do a residential delivery, but afterwards, he said he'd do it again no problem. I wish I had pics of the truck in the yard, but unfortunately, I do not.
DAVE :love: :beer:


sandman
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Post Mon. Aug. 11, 2008 11:14 pm

ScottD wrote:traderfjp;
Does kind of look that way. I had a dump trailer and I lined the trailer with the tarp first so it wouldn't leak through. I laid another on the ground and dumped the whole thing, first tarp and all on the second tarp. If you notice, there are two tarps on the ground. Because of that it looks a little poofy on the sides and gives the allusion of being sunken in I guess. Had it there too long and having trouble growing the grass back again. :oops:
were did you get your coal?

the cheapest place iv'e found for bulk is in cranston, ri.

i got 3tons of rice there last week @ 260 a ton
jim

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pret
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Location: Schaefferstown, PA (23 miles North of Lancaster)

Post Tue. Aug. 12, 2008 12:49 pm

Well, I finally got time to build my bins... two of them on casters. Went fairly well considering who built them! When it comes to constructing ANYTHING... it takes me on avg three attempts to get it right. Coal Berner helped me w/the plans... I'm happy w/how they turned out... except for using subpar materials NOT per my instructions! I've been kicking myself - all to save 30-40 bucks... stupid!

Anyhow... I'm using a hoist to dump the back end forward into the window well in the garage that shoots the pea coal to a plastic barrel in the basement... keeping my AA - little lady happy.

Still have to build some kind of support for the bin on the floor around the window well to meet the bin being dumped so that the coal will flow into the window well and not cause any dirt in the garage...

Oh, the top is removable and will be kept in place by tie downs. The same is true for the hinged door.
Attachments
IMG_6121.JPG
back of the bin
IMG_6119.JPG
front of the bin
IMG_6120.JPG
hinged door to allow for the coal to be dumped as it's being hoisted forward.
IMG_6075.JPG
The window well in the garage.
Burning pea coal in a rebuilt 1954 AA - 130... ahhhhh - I'm feeling it!

ScottD
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Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Hearth Stoker
Location: Eastern Mass

Post Tue. Aug. 12, 2008 11:29 pm

sandman;
I got the coal from the guy I bought my stove from. He was getting a new delivery and was making room for his 23 tons. I figured while I was getting the stove, might as well get the coal and know it's done for the season. Paid him $225 a ton.

Scott

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traderfjp
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Post Tue. Aug. 12, 2008 11:46 pm

Scott: The guy who sold u the stove forget the golden rule: U never have enough coal. :yes:
Disclaimer: I'm not an expert in any coal or plumbing related field. I only post my own experiences, research and common sense. If you choose to use any of the information in this post or any other post you do so at your own risk.

ScottD
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Posts: 187
Joined: Thu. Jun. 12, 2008 11:18 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Hearth Stoker
Location: Eastern Mass

Post Wed. Aug. 13, 2008 5:58 am

Oh Yeah, Just ask Freddy :lol: :lol: :lol:

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traderfjp
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Post Wed. Aug. 13, 2008 10:03 am

Lol: Every time I see the thread on hoarding I have to think of him. :twisted:
Disclaimer: I'm not an expert in any coal or plumbing related field. I only post my own experiences, research and common sense. If you choose to use any of the information in this post or any other post you do so at your own risk.

Dans58
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Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: 90K DV
Location: Ithaca, NY

Post Wed. Aug. 13, 2008 3:46 pm

I just finished converting my basement stairs into a bin. It's easy to fill as I just back my truck up to the exterior door, remove the top step (on hinges) and pour. It holds about 2500lbs. There is a hinged door on top of the bottom step that opens when I need to fill the stove (see picture #2). It took about 3 hours to build and I re-used most of the material from the old steps.
Coal Bin Pics 001.jpg
Bin with Access Door Closed
Attachments
Coal Bin Pics 002.jpg


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