Cleaning Glass/Stove

This forum is for common products and questions such as chimney installations, CO detectors, coal bin designs and a variety of other general topics that do not fit into the other forums.
beemerboy
Member
Posts: 451
Joined: Sat. Feb. 23, 2008 11:11 am
Stove/Furnace Make: SAEY
Stove/Furnace Model: Hannover 1
Location: North East Connecticut

Post Fri. Mar. 21, 2008 11:22 pm

ken wrote:my side panels shattered. I am replacing them with 3/16 flat stock. I washed and primed them with red primer. the red primer matches my stove. it's just regular primer. I bought 1,200 degree paint. should I use the paint or can I just use the primer. if I put the paint over the regular primer , it's not high temp primer. thank you , ken
Instructions on the can of Rust-oleum High Heat (1200 degree) paint says priming is NOT recommended.
"All I need on my journey is a wooded path, a dog by side to guide me home and a bench to sit on when I get tired." - Wayne, 2012.


User avatar
CoalHeat
Site Moderator
Posts: 8327
Joined: Sat. Feb. 10, 2007 9:48 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Baseburners & Antiques: Sears Signal Oak 15 & Andes Kitchen Range
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert
Location: Stillwater, New Jersey

Post Sat. Mar. 22, 2008 9:20 am

The door glass on the Alaska was getting really nasty, I had shut the stove down so before I relit it I cleaned the glass. I was able to get it all cleaned down to slight brown film on the surface. It's really tough to get off. A razor blade will work, but it's slow going and can scratch the surface. I tried some strong solvent as well with poor results. Next I will try a coarse rouge with a buffing wheel on one spot to see if the mild abrasive will cut through the film.
Heating a circa 1832 farmhouse with a Harman Magnafire Mark I & a 1959 EFM 350 (heating DHW).
100% Oil Free!
"It's what we learn after we think we know it all that counts."

aproth
New Member
Posts: 19
Joined: Wed. Oct. 25, 2006 1:40 pm
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker
Stove/Furnace Model: Comfortaire GT
Location: Bucks County ,PA

Post Tue. Apr. 01, 2008 9:25 pm

When I was calling around to glass dealers to get a price on replacement ceramic glass for my Keystoker one guy told me that the sulphuric acid in the coal smoke eats away at the glass. Even though it looks like there is a film on the glass it is really just the glass itself that is deteriorating. The best thing to do to make it last as long as possible is to keep it wiped clean as often as you can. But it is still a losing battle. Eventually the coal smoke wins.

ken
Member
Posts: 1262
Joined: Sat. Apr. 21, 2007 11:35 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Keystoker - Rice Coal
Stove/Furnace Model: 75K - Bay Window - Direct Vent
Location: thompson , ohio

Post Fri. Apr. 11, 2008 1:01 pm

i shut the stove down couple weeks ago and have been cleaning everything up. I can only do little buy little. on my glass I used a brass wire wheel 3" in a cordless drill and put it to the glass. I go forward , then switch to reverse , back and forth. I could not believe how clean the glass came out. got all the ruffness off , till I got it all smooth. well atleast when I fire her in the fall , I will be able to see the fire for awhile. :D
"Politicians are like socks; if you don't change them often enough they start to stink."

User avatar
CoalHeat
Site Moderator
Posts: 8327
Joined: Sat. Feb. 10, 2007 9:48 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Baseburners & Antiques: Sears Signal Oak 15 & Andes Kitchen Range
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert
Location: Stillwater, New Jersey

Post Fri. Apr. 11, 2008 9:23 pm

Last week when the Alaska was shut down I removed the top door and cleaned the glass. I ended up using a single edge razor to get the brown "film" off the glass. It took quite a while to get it clean. I coated the glass with a layer of Butcher's floor wax. After starting the fire the excess wax seemed to melt and then harden. The glass remained easy to keep clean, although it is beginning to become coated with a white haze as I am running the stove at a very low burn.
I am attempting to find a compound that will leave a coating on the glass (actually clear ceramic).
Heating a circa 1832 farmhouse with a Harman Magnafire Mark I & a 1959 EFM 350 (heating DHW).
100% Oil Free!
"It's what we learn after we think we know it all that counts."

User avatar
av8r
Member
Posts: 1163
Joined: Thu. Dec. 06, 2007 12:07 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Leisure Line Hearth with twin turbos (sounds like it)
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Hearth model with twin turbos
Location: Near Owego, NY

Post Sat. Apr. 12, 2008 9:47 pm

Wood'nCoal wrote:Last week when the Alaska was shut down I removed the top door and cleaned the glass. I ended up using a single edge razor to get the brown "film" off the glass. It took quite a while to get it clean. I coated the glass with a layer of Butcher's floor wax. After starting the fire the excess wax seemed to melt and then harden. The glass remained easy to keep clean, although it is beginning to become coated with a white haze as I am running the stove at a very low burn.
I am attempting to find a compound that will leave a coating on the glass (actually clear ceramic).
While I hope someone finds something, I think it doesn't exist.
"Fools you are. To say you learn by your experience. I prefer to profit by others' mistakes and avoid the price of my own."

- Otto von Bismarck

User avatar
CoalHeat
Site Moderator
Posts: 8327
Joined: Sat. Feb. 10, 2007 9:48 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Baseburners & Antiques: Sears Signal Oak 15 & Andes Kitchen Range
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert
Location: Stillwater, New Jersey

Post Sat. Apr. 12, 2008 10:13 pm

After 1 week the window had developed a white haze that made the glass almost impossible to see through. I took a wet rag and wiped it off and then dried it. It took a few times to get it clean, but it's clear again. Butcher's wax has Carnuba wax in it. The idea is to build up a coating on the surface that the products of combustion won't stick to. The only problem is how long will the coating last?
Heating a circa 1832 farmhouse with a Harman Magnafire Mark I & a 1959 EFM 350 (heating DHW).
100% Oil Free!
"It's what we learn after we think we know it all that counts."

User avatar
CoalHeat
Site Moderator
Posts: 8327
Joined: Sat. Feb. 10, 2007 9:48 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Baseburners & Antiques: Sears Signal Oak 15 & Andes Kitchen Range
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert
Location: Stillwater, New Jersey

Post Tue. Apr. 15, 2008 7:51 pm

After almost 1 1/2 weeks, the glass on the Alaska is still easily cleaned. I feel this is the easiest way to keep the glass clean:
As I mentioned earlier, I was no longer able to get the glass clean on the stove, after burning approx. 1 1/2 ton of coal. Even with thorough cleaning a brown film remained on the glass.
I finally removed the door and used Noxon and a sharp razor to scrape the coating off, took about 20 minutes. I then coated the window with a thick layer of Butcher's Floor Wax. After letting it dry for awhile I wiped it off. Butcher's wax has Carnuba wax in it, I suppose any Carnuba-based paste wax will work.
After restarting the stove the coating seemed to "melt" but it then hardened.
The glass still gets dirty, but I clean it with rags and water. When the stove is at low burn I shut the combustion fan and stoker motor off and open the door and spray water liberally on the glass (from a spray bottle) and wipe the glass off. I do this several times until it's clear again, and I mean it is clear.
I don't know how long this coat of wax will last, but so far so good.
It is imperative that the window be absolutely clean before applying the wax.
If anyone else tries this I would like to know how it works for you.
Butchers.aspx.jpeg
Butchers.aspx.jpeg (7.72 KiB) Viewed 3601 times
Heating a circa 1832 farmhouse with a Harman Magnafire Mark I & a 1959 EFM 350 (heating DHW).
100% Oil Free!
"It's what we learn after we think we know it all that counts."


User avatar
spc
Member
Posts: 1803
Joined: Sat. Jan. 06, 2007 9:51 am
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pioneer
Location: Rhode Island

Post Tue. Apr. 15, 2008 8:46 pm

Stephen
"Lord, free me of myself so I can please You." - Michaelangelo
“Christianity has not been tried and found false — it’s been tried and found too difficult.”-C.S. Lewis

User avatar
CoalHeat
Site Moderator
Posts: 8327
Joined: Sat. Feb. 10, 2007 9:48 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Baseburners & Antiques: Sears Signal Oak 15 & Andes Kitchen Range
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert
Location: Stillwater, New Jersey

Post Tue. Apr. 15, 2008 8:57 pm

Looks like a good idea, certainly easier then a razor blade, but you still need to put a coating on the glass to keep it from getting all mucked up again.
Heating a circa 1832 farmhouse with a Harman Magnafire Mark I & a 1959 EFM 350 (heating DHW).
100% Oil Free!
"It's what we learn after we think we know it all that counts."

User avatar
onehotxfirefighter
New Member
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon. Mar. 24, 2008 5:05 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Dunsley Yorkshire
Stove/Furnace Model: Yorkshire
Location: Loch Lomond Scotland United Kingdom
Contact:

Post Wed. Apr. 16, 2008 5:20 pm

You all need to try my favourite trick here.Just wipe the areas to be cleaned with an ONION that has been halved in two.Wipe the glass with the half of the onion (the wet side) and the carbon just melts away.

David
Loch Lomond
Scotland

User avatar
CoalHeat
Site Moderator
Posts: 8327
Joined: Sat. Feb. 10, 2007 9:48 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Baseburners & Antiques: Sears Signal Oak 15 & Andes Kitchen Range
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert
Location: Stillwater, New Jersey

Post Wed. Apr. 16, 2008 6:21 pm

onehotxfirefighter wrote:You all need to try my favourite trick here.Just wipe the areas to be cleaned with an ONION that has been halved in two.Wipe the glass with the half of the onion (the wet side) and the carbon just melts away.

David
Loch Lomond
Scotland
Interesting idea, David. Thanks.
Heating a circa 1832 farmhouse with a Harman Magnafire Mark I & a 1959 EFM 350 (heating DHW).
100% Oil Free!
"It's what we learn after we think we know it all that counts."

User avatar
spc
Member
Posts: 1803
Joined: Sat. Jan. 06, 2007 9:51 am
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pioneer
Location: Rhode Island

Post Wed. Apr. 16, 2008 7:29 pm

Is Dave playing with us. I could just here him at a Scottish pub. :lol:
Stephen
"Lord, free me of myself so I can please You." - Michaelangelo
“Christianity has not been tried and found false — it’s been tried and found too difficult.”-C.S. Lewis

User avatar
CoalHeat
Site Moderator
Posts: 8327
Joined: Sat. Feb. 10, 2007 9:48 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1959 EFM 350
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Magnafire Mark I
Baseburners & Antiques: Sears Signal Oak 15 & Andes Kitchen Range
Coal Size/Type: Rice and Chestnut
Other Heating: Fisher Fireplace Insert
Location: Stillwater, New Jersey

Post Wed. Apr. 16, 2008 8:12 pm

spc wrote:Is Dave playing with us. I could just here him at a Scottish pub. :lol:
While drinking a pint?

Only way to find out if it works is to try it.
Heating a circa 1832 farmhouse with a Harman Magnafire Mark I & a 1959 EFM 350 (heating DHW).
100% Oil Free!
"It's what we learn after we think we know it all that counts."

User avatar
onehotxfirefighter
New Member
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon. Mar. 24, 2008 5:05 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Dunsley Yorkshire
Stove/Furnace Model: Yorkshire
Location: Loch Lomond Scotland United Kingdom
Contact:

Post Fri. Apr. 18, 2008 1:46 am

Just give it a try it works for me .
**Broken Link(s) Removed**Is my local please join me for a Pint if you are ever over here


Post Reply

Return to “Coal Bins, Chimneys, CO Detectors & Thermostats”