What Do You Do With the Ashes?

Al F
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Post Sat. Dec. 29, 2007 10:01 am

I have been given someone to contact by Jim ( thank you!) and I have also contacted (waiting for a reply) one of the authors f an article that was shared above. And late last night I came across a Blasack brochure that said the ash is good for landscapes...I emailed them w my number. I will share what I learn.

Al F
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Post Thu. Jan. 03, 2008 10:34 am

i promised I would get back to everyone...i spoke with the people at Blaschak....they state that it is NO problem to dump on one;s own land, that the principle make up of the ahs is sand..and that potash and iron are the chief byproducts..and also that ANY trace minerals such as arsenic and metals is so low that it is comparable to existing soild and rocks...and he pointed out that they have in their area greenhouses using it to mix w clay soil to then plant in.

I also wrote to one of the fellows in the article posted by another member here, he wrote back stating that the anthracite is no issue at all.

So....i guess I wont be going to the dump after all

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av8r
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Post Thu. Jan. 03, 2008 10:43 am

So you're just going to believe them? Maybe this is a big plot to get people burning coal and using the ashes so that it makes people sick and reduces the population...huh...huh? What about that theory???

Just kidding...thanks for the update. Good news!

Al F
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Post Thu. Jan. 03, 2008 2:16 pm

hahahaha..i did have that same reaction..but after searching and searching I have found NOTHING to discredit the claim regarding anthracite is safe enough

with bituminous its different..there IS information


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Berlin
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Post Fri. Jan. 04, 2008 2:01 am

please.

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coalstoves
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Post Fri. Jan. 04, 2008 2:18 am

I chuck the ashes anywhere there is a low spot in the yard and pile it near the end every couple a years we spread it and raise the grade some everything grows great around the pile .

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JiminBucks
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Post Fri. Jan. 04, 2008 10:03 am

I saved up a couple of weeks worth, then raked the top fine stone off the driveway extension and spread it out and watered down, I did notice that any unburnt coal did seem to float to the top. When I get a chance I will try raking it off and recycling back into the fire!

Al F
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Post Fri. Jan. 04, 2008 10:05 am

ok..i may have to get my seesaw out.....dont dump everything just yet....

thanks to a member here, I was put in touch w someone who got someone very knowledgable about such matters to communicate with me...and he has provided me some pretty interesting info, which I will share here in the next day or so, after I ask a few more questions.


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Rex
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Post Fri. Jan. 04, 2008 11:07 am

Al F wrote:ok..i may have to get my seesaw out.....dont dump everything just yet....

thanks to a member here, I was put in touch w someone who got someone very knowledgable about such matters to communicate with me...and he has provided me some pretty interesting info, which I will share here in the next day or so, after I ask a few more questions.
Looking forward to your information.. Just be sure you can back it up with a web site or other verifiable means other than typing what someone has said.

Good job!!

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av8r
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Post Fri. Jan. 04, 2008 11:33 am

Al F wrote:ok..i may have to get my seesaw out.....dont dump everything just yet....

thanks to a member here, I was put in touch w someone who got someone very knowledgable about such matters to communicate with me...and he has provided me some pretty interesting info, which I will share here in the next day or so, after I ask a few more questions.

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coaledsweat
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Post Fri. Jan. 04, 2008 12:21 pm

Al F wrote:ok..i may have to get my seesaw out.....dont dump everything just yet....

thanks to a member here, I was put in touch w someone who got someone very knowledgable about such matters to communicate with me...and he has provided me some pretty interesting info, which I will share here in the next day or so, after I ask a few more questions.
Al, is that seesaw made of pressure treated? If so, a 12' 2" X 6" piece of PT lumber has enough copper arsenate (arsenic) to kill about 200 adults. When the wood gets wet, it leaches. When the wood rots, it goes in the soil and water. When your idiot neighbor burns it it goes in the air. It isn't going away ever, unless it finds a host. Be carefull where you park it.

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gambler
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Post Fri. Jan. 04, 2008 12:42 pm

coaledsweat wrote:
Al F wrote:ok..i may have to get my seesaw out.....dont dump everything just yet....

thanks to a member here, I was put in touch w someone who got someone very knowledgable about such matters to communicate with me...and he has provided me some pretty interesting info, which I will share here in the next day or so, after I ask a few more questions.
Al, is that seesaw made of pressure treated? If so, a 12' 2" X 6" piece of PT lumber has enough copper arsenate (arsenic) to kill about 200 adults. When the wood gets wet, it leaches. When the wood rots, it goes in the soil and water. When your idiot neighbor burns it it goes in the air. It isn't going away ever, unless it finds a host. Be carefull where you park it.
Until 2003, the preservative most commonly used in residential pressure-treated lumber was chromated copper arsenate (CCA), an extremely toxic chemical. Remember "Arsenic and Old Lace"? How about that old box of rat poison you have lurking in the garage? CCA is so toxic that the Environmental Protection Agency, over 20 years ago, imposed strict guidelines regarding the manufacturing practices of companies using CCA.

However, one must distinguish between the toxicity of the chemical and the toxicity of the wood product in everyday use. Extensive studies were done since the mid 1980's concerning the potential dangers of pressure-treated wood. And rightfully so! Large volumes of CCA were being used, and the treated wood products were beginning to be widely distributed, justifying the need for some hard research.

The research was mixed, but the typical hysteria ensued as attorneys and plaintiffs lined up to claim damages from exposure to CCA. In the end, the industry agreed to voluntarily eliminate use of CCA for residential use. Your local home store or lumberyard is now selling lumber treated with (hopefully) less toxic alternatives... amine copper quat (ACQ) and copper azone (CA)... though you may find other chemical combinations in specific areas. CCA is still being used in certain marine and industrial applications since it is still the best preservative available at the present time.

Whether these new chemicals will turn out to be less hazardous in the long term is anyone's guess.

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JiminBucks
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Post Fri. Jan. 04, 2008 1:15 pm

Burning pressure treated wood, reminded me of what I saw last week. Went down to the local bone yard to look for a spare tire. Unpon entering the office area, BTW this place is a wreck, well first I couldn't believe how smokey it was, so I left the door open. Then while taking to the teen/20's daughters running the place , I see the woodstove in the office behind the front desk. There next to it, is cut up pieces of plywood,with other lumber. :eek2: I told them not to burn that stuff as it contains for-mal-de-hide
:toothy: . They then replied that father told us not to burn it, but couldn't tell them why?
So they burnt it anyway! :hammer:
I was thinking of letting the local inspector know about there setup cause , it's a "fire waiting to happen"
after looking at the 'rigged' pipe sticking out of the wall!
Some people have no clue what their doing!

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