How Do You Distribute Heat From Your Stove?

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LsFarm
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Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
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Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland
Location: Michigan

Post Wed. Mar. 12, 2008 10:23 am

AH HA !! the plot thickens.. :shock: :lol: those US stove products are such a battle to try to burn coal in... I should have put a wager in my last post that it was a wood/coal combo stove by US Stoves.. You are not alone with your losing battle with a US stove product..

OK, do you remember what the draft was in the chimney with the 'HotBlast' furnace?? I mean did the installer ever put a Manometer in the pipe and get a number for the draft??

Here's the way I see your situation, you will really like the Mark II's heat and radiant heat in the living room, and it will do a fine job keeping the main floor warm. BUT if you use the basement a lot, and that is where you want to be comfortable, then I would still try the Harman Mark II in the basement... The MarkII will burn coal very well hooked to a chimney where the 'hotblast' furnace would struggle to burn at all.

A Harman Mark II is a very fine quality COAL-burning appliance, not a combo wood/coal appliance with a compromised firebox design. If you have a nice place to put a free-standing stove, and hook it to the chimney flue with a Baro-damper, then you should have a GOOD experience with the Harman in the basement.

If you spend most of your time on the main floor, and can tollerate a cooler basement, then your plan to install the MarkII in the fireplace will do the job...

Make sure that the chimney flue pipe from the Mark II is SEALED at the base of the fireplace chimney, don't let ANY air leaks exist to pull air from the room around the fireplace damper/flue pipe connection. I hope you are setting the MarkII out in the room in front of the fireplace. If you set the MarkII inside the fireplace opening, you will lose a lot of radiant heat off the stove-body, this radiant will just keep the bricks in the fireplace warm, instead of you and your living room.

Hope the above helps...
Greg L
Burning Pea/Buckwheat through an antique stoker [semi retired SSboiler],
Running an Axeman-Anderson 260M boiler burning Pea, About 150-250#per day
Farming, Fixing, Fabricating and Flying: 'spare time' what's that?

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submarines
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Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: Mk 2
Location: Northeast Ohio
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Post Wed. Mar. 12, 2008 11:04 am

LsFarm wrote:AH HA !! the plot thickens.. :shock: :lol: those US stove products are such a battle to try to burn coal in... I should have put a wager in my last post that it was a wood/coal combo stove by US Stoves.. You are not alone with your losing battle with a US stove product..

OK, do you remember what the draft was in the chimney with the 'HotBlast' furnace?? I mean did the installer ever put a Manometer in the pipe and get a number for the draft??

Here's the way I see your situation, you will really like the Mark II's heat and radiant heat in the living room, and it will do a fine job keeping the main floor warm. BUT if you use the basement a lot, and that is where you want to be comfortable, then I would still try the Harman Mark II in the basement... The MarkII will burn coal very well hooked to a chimney where the 'hotblast' furnace would struggle to burn at all.

A Harman Mark II is a very fine quality COAL-burning appliance, not a combo wood/coal appliance with a compromised firebox design. If you have a nice place to put a free-standing stove, and hook it to the chimney flue with a Baro-damper, then you should have a GOOD experience with the Harman in the basement.

If you spend most of your time on the main floor, and can tollerate a cooler basement, then your plan to install the MarkII in the fireplace will do the job...

Make sure that the chimney flue pipe from the Mark II is SEALED at the base of the fireplace chimney, don't let ANY air leaks exist to pull air from the room around the fireplace damper/flue pipe connection. I hope you are setting the MarkII out in the room in front of the fireplace. If you set the MarkII inside the fireplace opening, you will lose a lot of radiant heat off the stove-body, this radiant will just keep the bricks in the fireplace warm, instead of you and your living room.

Hope the above helps...
Greg L


I want to say the draft was .19. Don't really remember anymore. It is enough that my oil burner runs well with a barometric damper.

I will be putting the MkII probably 4 ish inches into the fireplace opening and will be sealing up the flue around the stove pipe. I will also be running that 76 CFM blower that comes with it. We spend most of our time upstairs, although my 17 y.o. daughter's bedroom is in the basement. That is why I was thinking of a ceramic heater in her room to take the bite out of the air.
To bad ignorance isn't painful!

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LsFarm
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Joined: Sun. Nov. 20, 2005 8:02 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
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Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland
Location: Michigan

Post Wed. Mar. 12, 2008 1:00 pm

Yeah, if you spend most of your time upstairs, then that is where I'd put the Mark II, radiant heat is very comfortable..

You should be able to figure out some method of keeping the downstairs bedroom warm...ductwork, ceramic heater, something..

Let us know how it works out..

Greg L.

.
Burning Pea/Buckwheat through an antique stoker [semi retired SSboiler],
Running an Axeman-Anderson 260M boiler burning Pea, About 150-250#per day
Farming, Fixing, Fabricating and Flying: 'spare time' what's that?

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submarines
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Joined: Tue. Mar. 11, 2008 11:52 am
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Post Wed. Mar. 12, 2008 1:29 pm

LsFarm wrote:Yeah, if you spend most of your time upstairs, then that is where I'd put the Mark II, radiant heat is very comfortable..

You should be able to figure out some method of keeping the downstairs bedroom warm...ductwork, ceramic heater, something..

Let us know how it works out..

Greg L.

.


Or maybe not heat it at all. Then she will get a job and move out, and I can get a pool table :lol:
To bad ignorance isn't painful!


User avatar
LsFarm
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Posts: 7385
Joined: Sun. Nov. 20, 2005 8:02 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
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Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland
Location: Michigan

Post Wed. Mar. 12, 2008 1:46 pm

:lol: :lol: :D
I thought about adding something like that... but decided not to... But yeah, put a timer on the ceramic heater, so it can't stay on longer than say 30 minutes without being reset/restarted... that ought to keep the bedroom from becoming an electricly heated sauna !1

Greg L

.
Burning Pea/Buckwheat through an antique stoker [semi retired SSboiler],
Running an Axeman-Anderson 260M boiler burning Pea, About 150-250#per day
Farming, Fixing, Fabricating and Flying: 'spare time' what's that?

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submarines
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Posts: 20
Joined: Tue. Mar. 11, 2008 11:52 am
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: Mk 2
Location: Northeast Ohio
Contact:

Post Wed. Mar. 12, 2008 1:57 pm

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Thanks for the input!
To bad ignorance isn't painful!

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rewinder
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Stove/Furnace Make: VT Castings--early models
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Location: So NH

Post Sat. Oct. 18, 2008 10:26 pm

Thought I'd post my results with this small squirrel cage blower I mounted in my doorway. I mounted it with the outlet just sticking below the top of the doorway, the blower is above it and it pulls the air from the ceiling. Absolutely quiet, but kind of unsightly. A candle held at floor level shows cool air coming into the room the stove is in. It hangs on 2 L shaped metal tabs I mounted on the fan's frame--simple.

I used model J571 listed on this page:
**Broken Link(s) Removed**
I tried the larger one shown there, but it was too noisy and blew too muh air I thought.

I have 2 coal stoves in diferent ends of the house, both blowing in to the main section.

Hope this helps someone wanting to get hot air moving

Paul

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captcaper
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Post Sun. Oct. 19, 2008 10:33 am

I have a new home,new stove,new expierence coming this season. With that aside. I work on one end of the basement and the stove is on the opposite side. MarkIII. Cape style house Basement is 20x30. Much too warm now for me working. I have hung curtains that helps but it is still too warm.
I have a window fan hung from the floor above directing warm air from warmer side into and up the stairway to the kitchen,living room area which I really would like most of the heat. I have a Beckman System oil fired hot water baseboads. 5 zones for the house.
Lot's of good ideas here. I was thinking of the one with the bathroom exhust fan into a duck to stairway to upstairs mid way in cellar. Or a catch above the stove with a duck network to the stairwell. With a inline fan.

Upstairs is warm enough so far. It was 22 out last night. My work area is too hot to physically work for me.
Current Stove Harman Super Magnum
Owned before
Harman Mark III Wood Parlor stove Scandia Wood Stove 2 Chubby Coal Stoves Small Pot Belly Cast Iron


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Devil505
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Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: TLC-2000
Location: SE Massachusetts

Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2008 10:14 am

I'm in the process of getting my daughter's house regulated & thought I'd share my findings, so far:

They have a 44'X24' ranch with an unfinished basement & a center stairway leading up to the middle of the house. The TLC is located in the basement on the concrete floor with un-insulated (10" thick) concrete walls & a drafty bulkhead from outside. It is vented into a new masonry chimney which has great draw & to which I hooked up a baro damper.
I figured that the floor & walls would suck all the heat out of the stove, but without doing anything (so far) the heat is traveling up the basement stairs just fine & warming their first floor! basement is toasty too! They have allot of insulation in the attic & all the windows are double glazed & new.
I want them to cut a few floor vents anyway, (just to get the circulation going well) but I'm amazed at how warm the house is being kept with the stove averaging about 240*.
War is a game that is played with a smile. If you can't smile, grin. If you can't grin, keep out of the way till you can.
Winston Churchill
Shaking & Poking The TLC2000 Video

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LsFarm
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Posts: 7385
Joined: Sun. Nov. 20, 2005 8:02 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland
Location: Michigan

Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2008 10:32 am

Hi Dev, don't forget the ground doesn't have any frost in it yet,, so the big heat sink from the surrounding frozen ground hasn't started to work yet.. Watch the snow when it comes.. it will be melted several feet from the house,, the ground probably won't get frost in it next to the house..

Greg L..
Burning Pea/Buckwheat through an antique stoker [semi retired SSboiler],
Running an Axeman-Anderson 260M boiler burning Pea, About 150-250#per day
Farming, Fixing, Fabricating and Flying: 'spare time' what's that?

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Devil505
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Joined: Tue. Jul. 03, 2007 10:44 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: TLC-2000
Location: SE Massachusetts

Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2008 10:47 am

LsFarm wrote:Hi Dev, don't forget the ground doesn't have any frost in it yet,, so the big heat sink from the surrounding frozen ground hasn't started to work yet.. Watch the snow when it comes.. it will be melted several feet from the house,, the ground probably won't get frost in it next to the house..
I'll keep my eye on it Greg but I'm amazed at how warm the basement already is with bare cement walls & floor. The walls are 10" thick so I don't know if that'll help with the heat loss? (if worse comes to worse I'll have Wayne put up some Styrofoam insulation on the walls)
War is a game that is played with a smile. If you can't smile, grin. If you can't grin, keep out of the way till you can.
Winston Churchill
Shaking & Poking The TLC2000 Video

User avatar
LsFarm
Member
Posts: 7385
Joined: Sun. Nov. 20, 2005 8:02 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Self-built 'Big Bertha' SS Boiler
Baseburners & Antiques: Keystone 11, Art Garland
Location: Michigan

Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2008 11:02 am

I'd put the foam up now.. why burn coal [unless it's free and unlimited] to heat the basement walls??

I think your central stairways are what make your heat distribution so even. A ranch style house with the stairway at an end will not have as even heat.

Greg L.
Burning Pea/Buckwheat through an antique stoker [semi retired SSboiler],
Running an Axeman-Anderson 260M boiler burning Pea, About 150-250#per day
Farming, Fixing, Fabricating and Flying: 'spare time' what's that?

User avatar
Devil505
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Posts: 7110
Joined: Tue. Jul. 03, 2007 10:44 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: TLC-2000
Location: SE Massachusetts

Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2008 11:24 am

LsFarm wrote:I'd put the foam up now.. why burn coal [unless it's free and unlimited] to heat the basement walls??
I'd do it Greg but my son-in-law (Wayne) is in the middle of deer hunting season, so he's not into it yet! ;)

I want him to wall off the bulkhead & make a little dirty room there to transfer coal ash into the barrel, etc & seal that off better due to the draft from the bulkhead. It's not my house so I'll let my daughter work on him!
If it was up to me, I'd have the floor vents cut today! :lol:
War is a game that is played with a smile. If you can't smile, grin. If you can't grin, keep out of the way till you can.
Winston Churchill
Shaking & Poking The TLC2000 Video

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