Manometer Install

This forum is for common products and questions such as chimney installations, CO detectors, coal bin designs and a variety of other general topics that do not fit into the other forums.
User avatar
Lightning
Member
Posts: 8304
Joined: Wed. Nov. 16, 2011 9:51 am
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Overmodified/Bored out Clayton 1537
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Awesome Size
Location: Olean, NY

Post Fri. Oct. 24, 2014 12:58 pm

I've never seen one for sale in any stores locally. I think stove shops and manufacturers are hesitant to push them onto consumers because it might derail a sale. Who would want a coal stove when they require some weird complicated instrument to operate it safely?

Truth is, they are simple to use and every coal burner should have one..


User avatar
titleist1
Member
Posts: 4404
Joined: Wed. Nov. 14, 2007 4:06 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Mag Stoker (old style) one in basement, one in workshop
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III on standby for long power outages
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite; Nut/Anthracite
Location: Cecil County, MD

Post Fri. Oct. 24, 2014 1:22 pm

If you really must have it right away, I believe you have a good chance of finding one at a Grainger store. I would call first and ask if they have it in stock before making the trip though. Their part number is 2T650 for the Mark II Model 25...
I drive a VW TDI, heat my home & workshop with two coal stokers and have two vintage JD diesel tractors....
The EPA just loves me!!

User avatar
ShawnTRD
Member
Posts: 405
Joined: Tue. Feb. 04, 2014 1:04 am
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA6 (New in April 2014)
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Rice
Other Heating: Weil Mclain WGO-2 (Net 75k BTU)
Location: Spencer, NY

Post Fri. Oct. 24, 2014 1:32 pm

You can have it tomorrow if order within 27 mins and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009PAN3C8/ref=biss_dp_t_asn

BrandonCampbell
New Member
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed. Oct. 15, 2014 9:14 am
Coal Size/Type: alaska kast console ii
Location: central pa

Post Fri. Oct. 24, 2014 2:06 pm

ya I ordered it from amazon about an hr ago..and I didnt really need right now. just getting excited about getting things up and lit....

User avatar
Rick 386
Member
Posts: 2474
Joined: Mon. Jan. 28, 2008 4:26 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: AA 260 heating both sides of twin farmhouse
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: LL Hyfire II w/ coaltrol in garage
Coal Size/Type: Pea in AA 260, Rice in LL Hyfire II
Other Heating: Gas fired infared at work
Location: Royersford, Pa
Contact:

Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2014 9:25 am

ShawnTRD wrote:Most people I know that burn coal don't know about then either. Fatger in-law just set is damper to very light resistance. I think that can lead to burning more coal then needed or chance is carbon monoxide leaking into the house.
On the contrary Shawn. The baro damper set on very little resistance allows it to open that much sooner thereby limiting his draft to low. The quicker the baro opens, the more air that is drawn into the pipe and not up through the coal bed.

And........ the only way CO will leak into the house is if the chimney loses draft. An open baro means the chimney is drawing so much that it causes the baro flap to open. The exhaust from the stove should combine with the air from the baro and be pulled up and out through the chimney. Setting the weight on the baro causes the flapper to open when the draft exceeds the set amount of the weight.

Make sense ????

Rick
Master of "Trial and Error."

User avatar
ShawnTRD
Member
Posts: 405
Joined: Tue. Feb. 04, 2014 1:04 am
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA6 (New in April 2014)
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Rice
Other Heating: Weil Mclain WGO-2 (Net 75k BTU)
Location: Spencer, NY

Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2014 9:53 am

Guess I don't understand what your trying to say. I was saying that without the manometer you don't know if you are pulling air enough or to much air from your fire box. Pull to much and you're sucking the heat right out the chimney. Pull to little and your taking a chance of leaking carbon monoxide out to the living area. Do I have it wrong?
Rick 386 wrote:On the contrary Shawn. The baro damper set on very little resistance allows it to open that much sooner thereby limiting his draft to low. The quicker the baro opens, the more air that is drawn into the pipe and not up through the coal bed.

And........ the only way CO will leak into the house is if the chimney loses draft. An open baro means the chimney is drawing so much that it causes the baro flap to open. The exhaust from the stove should combine with the air from the baro and be pulled up and out through the chimney. Setting the weight on the baro causes the flapper to open when the draft exceeds the set amount of the weight.

Make sense ????

Rick

User avatar
Lightning
Member
Posts: 8304
Joined: Wed. Nov. 16, 2011 9:51 am
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Overmodified/Bored out Clayton 1537
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Awesome Size
Location: Olean, NY

Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2014 4:26 pm

ShawnTRD wrote:Pull to little and your taking a chance of leaking carbon monoxide out to the living area. Do I have it wrong?
Any amount of negative pressure, no matter how weak, will keep CO contained in the flue pipe.. I've held my nose over the baro with barely any draft reading at all (like a tenth of a -.01"wc) and smelled no coal exhaust.

User avatar
titleist1
Member
Posts: 4404
Joined: Wed. Nov. 14, 2007 4:06 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Mag Stoker (old style) one in basement, one in workshop
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III on standby for long power outages
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite; Nut/Anthracite
Location: Cecil County, MD

Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2014 5:40 pm

Lightning wrote:Any amount of negative pressure, no matter how weak, will keep CO contained in the flue pipe..
True for the flue pipe...

the way I read it I thought he was concerned about a combustion fan blowing in more air than his flue pipe was exhausting (low draft) and CO was seeping out other places on the stove....

but maybe I was reading too much into it....

but then from the dark recesses of my cobwebby brain I remember there is the danger of going to bed with a low draft in place and sometime through the night the chimney cools enough and maybe wind conditions cause a downdraft before the fire goes out........

I had a variation of that happen although it was with a wood fire in the mark III not a coal fire....
I would guess that in a hand fed the coal fire would probably go out due to the low draft before dumping CO from the stove from a downdraft.
I drive a VW TDI, heat my home & workshop with two coal stokers and have two vintage JD diesel tractors....
The EPA just loves me!!


User avatar
Lightning
Member
Posts: 8304
Joined: Wed. Nov. 16, 2011 9:51 am
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Overmodified/Bored out Clayton 1537
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Awesome Size
Location: Olean, NY

Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2014 9:12 pm

To the contrary, a chimney draft failure with a hand fed will spill a lot of CO into the stove room before going out. I used to have this issue quite often before I learned how to prevent draft failures.

User avatar
ShawnTRD
Member
Posts: 405
Joined: Tue. Feb. 04, 2014 1:04 am
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA6 (New in April 2014)
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Rice
Other Heating: Weil Mclain WGO-2 (Net 75k BTU)
Location: Spencer, NY

Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2014 9:25 pm

Lightning wrote:To the contrary, a chimney draft failure with a hand fed will spill a lot of CO into the stove room before going out. I used to have this issue quite often before I learned how to prevent draft failures.
And what was it that you learned?

User avatar
Lightning
Member
Posts: 8304
Joined: Wed. Nov. 16, 2011 9:51 am
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Overmodified/Bored out Clayton 1537
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Awesome Size
Location: Olean, NY

Post Sat. Nov. 01, 2014 3:12 am

ShawnTRD wrote:
Lightning wrote:To the contrary, a chimney draft failure with a hand fed will spill a lot of CO into the stove room before going out. I used to have this issue quite often before I learned how to prevent draft failures.
And what was it that you learned?
To use extra secondary combustion air during warm weather burning. I realize this works against normal reasoning on the surface but here's what happens. The extra secondary air doesn't contribute to combustion much during a low/slow burn. Instead it gets heated, and acts as extra air mass to keep the chimney draft going the right way. Keep in mind this is for a hand fed, and if you have a MPD it needs to be open. Of course these conditions make for inefficient heat transfer, but during warm weather I really don't mind.

User avatar
CoalisCoolxWarm
Member
Posts: 1401
Joined: Wed. Jan. 19, 2011 11:41 am
Stoker Coal Boiler: Keystoker KA-6
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: old Sears rebuilt, bituminous- offline as of winter 2014
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Buckwheat
Other Heating: Oil Boiler
Location: Western PA

Post Mon. Jan. 18, 2016 10:52 am

My turn!

Here's a Dwyer on my Keystoker KA-6.
IMAG3060.jpg
IMAG3061.jpg
IMAG3083.jpg
IMAG3046.jpg
IMAG3084.jpg
IMAG3190.jpg
Now adjusted the baro to maintain .02 over the fire.

The pre-drilled hole in the door from Keystoker has the flexible brake line (bend with your hands without kinks) and enough give to open the inspection door enough to check the fire, plus enough flex to pull out the tube and swing out of the way for full access.

Yes, that is a SECOND line to the stove pipe. I have to change the rubber tube on the mano to the other line that is right there, too, if I want to measure at the stove pipe. Notice the short piece of "open to atmosphere" line hanging over to avoid dust getting in it (on the HIGH side- backwards as recommended here)

.020-.025 is where she stays now, though I did have to add a washer to the weighted nut on the baro to get down that low. Boy, these things are TINY drafters, LOL!

Used the included sheet metal screws in the Dwyer kit to mount. Did pre-drill the holes, though with a small bit. Standard metal wire clips (bent closed a bit more) to hold the lines and the wires on the cover. Chose the edge because it is neat and doubled up thickness there.

After stressing over the mounting location a bit, finally chose this spot and am well pleased with it. Everything is out of the way and can be checked at a glance.

Hope this helps the next guy 8-)
Keystoker KA-6 online January 2015

User avatar
corey
Member
Posts: 816
Joined: Fri. Nov. 14, 2014 11:14 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: USS Ashley coal stove
Coal Size/Type: Eastern KY bituminous
Location: Southwest VA

Post Tue. Jan. 10, 2017 6:54 am

I purchased a 20 inches brake line yesterday. Just wondering how far in the pipe it needs to go?

User avatar
Lightning
Member
Posts: 8304
Joined: Wed. Nov. 16, 2011 9:51 am
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Overmodified/Bored out Clayton 1537
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite/Awesome Size
Location: Olean, NY

Post Tue. Jan. 10, 2017 7:03 am

corey wrote:I purchased a 20 inches brake line yesterday. Just wondering how far in the pipe it needs to go?
Just a couple inches. Use a drill bit the same size as the brake line. It doesn't need to be an air tight connection going into the pipe. You'll wanna be able to slide the probe out occasionally for zeroing the gauge and keeping the tip clean.

User avatar
corey
Member
Posts: 816
Joined: Fri. Nov. 14, 2014 11:14 am
Hand Fed Coal Stove: USS Ashley coal stove
Coal Size/Type: Eastern KY bituminous
Location: Southwest VA

Post Tue. Jan. 10, 2017 7:25 am

Lightning wrote:
corey wrote:I purchased a 20 inches brake line yesterday. Just wondering how far in the pipe it needs to go?
Just a couple inches. Use a drill bit the same size as the brake line. It doesn't need to be an air tight connection going into the pipe. You'll wanna be able to slide the probe out occasionally for zeroing the gauge and keeping the tip clean.
Thanks Lee.

Manometer is scheduled to arrive tomorrow. I plan on putting the probe right above the elbow leaving the stove.

Hope this makes running the stove better.


Post Reply

Return to “Coal Bins, Chimneys, CO Detectors & Thermostats”