Pounds Per Day Used?

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gambler
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Post Sat. Oct. 25, 2008 9:59 am

cool-coal wrote:Since I got my Liberty stove installed last Oct 10th in my stone basement with a pipe throwing the heat to the fist and only floor,
It sounds like you are using that much coal because you are heating the basement which is transfering your heat to the ground and not to the house. I can tell you at this rate you will need more coal. Probably twice as much as you have. I have a 2000sqft home built in 1995 that has good insulation but I do have a lot of big windows and my stove is in my dining room and I burned 4 ton last year keeping my house at 73. You need to insulate that basement and create a return air path to the stove.
cool-coal wrote:The house in now @ 65 degrees and I’m consuming almost 2 50 pound bags a day
Last year on some of the coldest days of the year (-5) I used 85 pounds of coal. So if you are using #100 now your stove is not going to keep up and your house will be colder than 65 when the weather gets cold.


cool-coal
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Post Sat. Oct. 25, 2008 12:11 pm

Thanks Devil505, I’ll try to stay calm, anyway, if I have to buy a 4th ton that would still be cheaper than heating up with oil. As for insulation, I put the blow in type in the attic. (Lots of fun)Not sure about walls, how can I found out? .And the windows are the replacement windows. Closing unused rooms could create mold?
I’ll keep you guys posted, Thanks
:)

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coalmeister
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Post Sat. Oct. 25, 2008 2:48 pm

Just was wondering if you guys set back your tstats at night and if so to what?

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gambler
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Post Sat. Oct. 25, 2008 3:32 pm

cool-coal wrote:Thanks Devil505, I’ll try to stay calm, anyway, if I have to buy a 4th ton that would still be cheaper than heating up with oil. As for insulation, I put the blow in type in the attic. (Lots of fun)Not sure about walls, how can I found out? .And the windows are the replacement windows. Closing unused rooms could create mold?
I’ll keep you guys posted, Thanks
:)
You need the insulation on the basement walls.
And you need to hook up an air return from the living area to the stoves convection blower. You are using the cold basement air and heating it then blowing it upstairs.

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Devil505
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Post Sat. Oct. 25, 2008 3:35 pm

gambler wrote:You need the insulation on the basement walls
Missed that...I agree. (a stone wall will suck the heat out like a sponge)

cool-coal
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Post Sun. Oct. 26, 2008 10:48 am

Will I fix the problem If I hook up an air return from the living area to the stoves convection blower?

Gaptooth
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Post Sun. Oct. 26, 2008 2:29 pm

I haven't set my tstat back at night. I did at first but just leave it at the same temp all the time now. I find this helps me a avoid a yo-yo effect when the stove tries to go down or up to the desired temp. Has worked well so far.

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Devil505
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Post Sun. Oct. 26, 2008 4:40 pm

I think I'm burning around 25-30lbs per day at this point.


GettingStoked
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Post Sun. Oct. 26, 2008 8:10 pm

Same here, I took one of my 5gal buckets and weighed it at 32lbs (not filled to the brim) and I go through about one of them a day with the temps down in the 20's and up into the 40/50s. I'm only running my stove on a setting of 2.5 at the coldest days. Once it drops into the teens I suspect I will be up to 3 to 3.5 on the dial and using 1.5 to 2 bucketts a day. I know I will most likely be short with my 4050lbs of coal at 32lbs per day = 126 days or roughly Februrary. So I would suspect I will need more coal by early to late Januarary. This will not be a problem for I've already not speding 1200 on propane and I haven't used my electric baseboard for heat yet either. :D

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Freddy
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Post Sun. Oct. 26, 2008 8:34 pm

Cool-Coal... certainly if you can make ductwork that ducts the heat upstairs and a cold air return right to the stove, you'd get far more heat upstairs and not waste it to the cellar so much. It would help a bunch if you could insulate the cellar walls. If you can't spend the money to do the entire walls, if you insulate from the top down two, three, or four feet, it will go a long way to saving heat. On older homes they sometimes suggest to only do four feet from the top. It's a bad thing to let the foundation freeze. Insulating just the top four feet saves bunches of heat, yet allows enough to escape to keep the ground just outside from freezing and stressing the foundation.

I just got on line this week. I can't measure the coal going in, but I can measure the ashes coming out. Today was the first day I measured.... 2.41 pounds of ash for 24 hours. How can I convert backwards to know how much Superior coal I'm using?

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LsFarm
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Post Sun. Oct. 26, 2008 10:41 pm

You really can't.. too many variables.. just start using that stock pile of coal.. let us know what you calculate in a few years.. :shock: :lol:

Greg L.

Linc
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Post Tue. Oct. 28, 2008 6:21 pm

At present I'm using about 25# per day. I estimate that for the month of October I will use roughly 325#. :D

cool-coal
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Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2008 12:06 pm

[quote="Freddy"]Cool-Coal... certainly if you can make ductwork that ducts the heat upstairs and a cold air return right to the stove, you'd get far more heat upstairs and not waste it to the cellar so much. It would help a bunch if you could insulate the cellar walls. If you can't spend the money to do the entire walls, if you insulate from the top down two, three, or four feet, it will go a long way to saving heat. On older homes they sometimes suggest to only do four feet from the top. It's a bad thing to let the foundation freeze. Insulating just the top four feet saves bunches of heat, yet allows enough to escape to keep the ground just outside from freezing and stressing the foundation.
Thanks Freddy and gambler. I will try to get the husband to do 4 ft of insulation, will go to Home depot to find out what kind do I need?
avout the return my husband is giving me a hard time since he just refinished the hard wood... I will keep you and Devil505 about progress.

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JohnnyAsbury
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Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2008 4:08 pm

20 lbs. a day, house is 77 *, window is open.

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Ed.A
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Post Fri. Oct. 31, 2008 7:11 pm

GettingStoked wrote:Same here, I took one of my 5gal buckets and weighed it at 32lbs (not filled to the brim) and I go through about one of them a day with the temps down in the 20's and up into the 40/50s. I'm only running my stove on a setting of 2.5 at the coldest days. Once it drops into the teens I suspect I will be up to 3 to 3.5 on the dial and using 1.5 to 2 bucketts a day. I know I will most likely be short with my 4050lbs of coal at 32lbs per day = 126 days or roughly Februrary. So I would suspect I will need more coal by early to late Januarary. This will not be a problem for I've already not speding 1200 on propane and I haven't used my electric baseboard for heat yet either. :D
Actually 32lbs per day is pretty much inline at those temps. maybe a little high compared to mine but I don't know your square footage . At a bit over 1600sq I got 50lbs per day during mid-winter and cold stretchs of a week or so upped it. Of course many variables like insulation , warming trends and such differ. You may need a 1/2 ton or so more, but not to bad of an estimate.


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