Advice With the Harman Super Mag

A Coal stoker furnace or stove controls most operations including automatically feeding the coal. They are quite similar to any conventional oil and gas units and easily operated for extended periods of time. They commonly use rice coal but may use larger sizes like buckwheat. They can be used as primary heat, supplementary heat or have a dual set up with your existing oil/gas furnace.
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jkrf27
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Posts: 18
Joined: Sat. Jan. 19, 2013 10:38 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: Super Mag

Post Sun. Jan. 20, 2013 10:04 am

just wondering if anyone would share they're preferred settings for this stove. Room temp or stove temp? I know every application is different but, I have done nothing but jump the settings around every other day trying to get the best burn w/ little luck. Also, im burning through coal, about 80 lbs a day. Any advice would be appreciated.
Thanks

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coalkirk
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Posts: 4679
Joined: Wed. May. 17, 2006 8:12 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: 1981 EFM DF520
Coal Size/Type: anthracite/rice coal
Location: Forest Hill MD

Post Sun. Jan. 20, 2013 10:14 am

I don't burn the super mag but have burned the regular mag and the vf3k boiler which uses the same stoker. As you said, every application is different. I'm assuming you are trying to heat your whole home with this stove. Many do heat their homes this way but it's an uphill battle. I average 60 #'s per day right now in my boiler heating my entire home. Using 80#'s per day doesn't sound too bad considering it's a stove with a tough mission. If you have a little ash at the end of your grate before it falls into the ash pan AND you have a properly adjusted barometric damper installed so you are retaining the heat you produce, I'd say you are getting the most you will get from a stove.
You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life. Winston Churchill

"I would rather have a German division in front of me than a French one behind me." —General George S. Patton

Burning rice coal in a 1981 EFM DF520, nut coal in a hand fired Jotul 507.

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Coalfire
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Posts: 1029
Joined: Mon. Nov. 23, 2009 8:28 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine 96K btu Circulator
Coal Size/Type: Nut
Location: Denver, PA

Post Sun. Jan. 20, 2013 10:19 am

where are you located and where is stove located? How big and old is house.

I had a Mag stoker for a little, when I piped the air upstairs it almost cut my consumption in half

Eric

jkrf27
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Posts: 18
Joined: Sat. Jan. 19, 2013 10:38 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: Super Mag

Post Sun. Jan. 20, 2013 11:51 am

I am in northeastern pa. White haven/Freeland area. The house, including the basement is about 3200 sq ft. About 80-90 yrs old. It was gutted in 1978 but insulated poorly. I have 3 doors to repplace and 3 windows. I aslo have some oil left in the tank for my steam baseboard, but I want to rid myself of the oil. I also have hydronic electric baseboard upstairs. Im not trying to heat the whole house, although that would be great, I expected the basement to be heated, along with the floor being warm( it is in some areas), and the first floor warm. I understand heat rises. It almost seems like the heat is rising to fast because I think the upstairs is more comfortable than the first??!! I have the basement door open, and 5 registers I arranged to be in the coldest areas of each room. I thought that would make a circulation. Warm air rising up the steps, and the cold air falling at the windows in each room. Just not going to plan as of now. I am planning for some ductwork.
Thanks


jkrf27
New Member
Posts: 18
Joined: Sat. Jan. 19, 2013 10:38 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: Super Mag

Post Sun. Jan. 20, 2013 11:53 am

sorry, my stove is in the middle of the basement, piped into the chimney.

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McGiever
Member
Posts: 5997
Joined: Sun. May. 02, 2010 11:26 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: AXEMAN-ANDERSON 130 "1959"
Coal Size/Type: PEA / ANTHRACITE
Other Heating: Ground Source Heat Pump
Stove/Furnace Make: Hydro Heat /Mega Tek
Location: Junction of PA-OH-WV

Post Sun. Jan. 20, 2013 1:02 pm

jkrf27 wrote:I am in northeastern pa. White haven/Freeland area. The house, including the basement is about 3200 sq ft. About 80-90 yrs old. It was gutted in 1978 but insulated poorly. I have 3 doors to repplace and 3 windows. I aslo have some oil left in the tank for my steam baseboard, but I want to rid myself of the oil. I also have hydronic electric baseboard upstairs. Im not trying to heat the whole house, although that would be great, I expected the basement to be heated, along with the floor being warm( it is in some areas), and the first floor warm. I understand heat rises. It almost seems like the heat is rising to fast because I think the upstairs is more comfortable than the first??!! I have the basement door open, and 5 registers I arranged to be in the coldest areas of each room. I thought that would make a circulation. Warm air rising up the steps, and the cold air falling at the windows in each room. Just not going to plan as of now. I am planning for some ductwork.
Thanks
What air path is allowing warm air to the upstairs...and can you regulate that pathway to slow down the movement? This would help improve temps on first floor. :idea:

If you have an open floor plan, then only a ceiling fan pushing down will help. :)
SLOW AND STEADY WINS THE RACE

jkrf27
New Member
Posts: 18
Joined: Sat. Jan. 19, 2013 10:38 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: Super Mag

Post Sun. Jan. 20, 2013 2:51 pm

the basement door being open is allowing the heat to get upstairs . I have attempted to close the door with the idea of more heat rising up through the registers but with no luck and in the morning the house was colder. it seems like I have tried many of the suggestions I have been getting already. I am going to run ductwork and see if that helps me out. If not, ill be installing an insert in my fireplace. Thanks

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titleist1
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Posts: 4404
Joined: Wed. Nov. 14, 2007 4:06 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman Mag Stoker (old style) one in basement, one in workshop
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Harman Mark III on standby for long power outages
Coal Size/Type: Rice/Anthracite; Nut/Anthracite
Location: Cecil County, MD

Post Sun. Jan. 20, 2013 9:02 pm

A couple thoughts....
The size of the house and poor insulation makes the 80lb seem reasonable to me. Basement walls insulated? I have our regular mag stoker in the uninsulated basement heating about 2800 sqft and am using 50-80 lbs per day. depends on how cold it is of course, and I am a lot further south than you are.

Air circulation is one of the the toughest nuts to crack in my opinion because each house is very different with its air circulation. What helps the cold air return from the furthest rooms is having duct work from the floor register drop to the basement floor. I disconnect the A/C supply duct in the furthest room from the trunk leaving it on the floor register and have it dropped to the floor. Without this it seems most posts I have read indicate the warm air at the basement ceiling keeps the cool air from dropping. If the cool air doesn't leave the room, the warm air won't flow in as well.
I drive a VW TDI, heat my home & workshop with two coal stokers and have two vintage JD diesel tractors....
The EPA just loves me!!


jkrf27
New Member
Posts: 18
Joined: Sat. Jan. 19, 2013 10:38 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: Super Mag

Post Sun. Jan. 20, 2013 10:45 pm

the basement is not finished nor insulated. its an old stone foundation that is about 2.5 ft wide. I just installed new windows. Im going to get some ducts and make some short runs with dampers. I tend to agrre with the theory of the warm air at the basement ceiling trapping the cold air unless you have ductwork. I am goin g to run two 5-10 ft ducts to registers. See what happens. I know that stove can do a better job of heating on the first floor, just have to mess around for a little

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Rob R.
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Posts: 11346
Joined: Fri. Dec. 28, 2007 4:26 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM DF520
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Lehigh Rice
Other Heating: Dad's 1953 EFM Highboy
Location: Chazy, NY

Post Mon. Jan. 21, 2013 3:57 pm

jkrf27 wrote:the basement is not finished nor insulated. its an old stone foundation that is about 2.5 ft wide.
Those basement walls are going to absorb a ton of heat...you will need to duct the hot air to the first floor to get better results.

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Coaled&Tyred
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Posts: 4
Joined: Wed. May. 25, 2011 9:07 am
Stove/Furnace Make: Axeman-Anderson, Harmon
Stove/Furnace Model: aa130, Super Magnum
Location: New Hampshire

Post Tue. Jan. 22, 2013 7:45 pm

I had a super mag in the basement ducted to the first floor. Put out lots of heat, but much of it was lost in an area where it was not needed. The super mag went to the folks house where it is in a family room, doing great. I installed a boiler to transfer the heat to the upper floors

jkrf27
New Member
Posts: 18
Joined: Sat. Jan. 19, 2013 10:38 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: Super Mag

Post Tue. Jan. 22, 2013 8:07 pm

Did you have dampers inline with your ductwork to help steer and control the airflow. I was hoping I could attempt to distribute the heat as evenly as possible with dampers. I am only planning to have a 15 ft trunk with 2-4 ft braches. I thnik with the use of dampers I will be ok, but..... I have been wrong before. I'm running the trunk and 2 supply registers this weekend. I'll keep eveyone updated.
Thanks

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2001Sierra
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Posts: 1844
Joined: Wed. May. 20, 2009 8:09 am
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90 Chimney vent
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Other Heating: Buderus Oil Boiler 3115-34
Stove/Furnace Model: Keystoker 90 Chimney Vent
Location: Wynantskill NY, 10 miles from Albany

Post Tue. Jan. 22, 2013 8:54 pm

I am running a Panasonic FV-20NLF1 in kind of a push pull setup off the duct ring welded into my Keystoker 90. The Keystoker pushes 250 CFM, and the Panasonic pulls at about 250 to 260 CFM. It is amazing how the heat is now so even. the basement runs 72 to 74 and upstairs is set at 68 to 69 depending on the thermostat upstairs managing the Panasonic blower.

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