Quieter Is Better...

A Coal stoker furnace or stove controls most operations including automatically feeding the coal. They are quite similar to any conventional oil and gas units and easily operated for extended periods of time. They commonly use rice coal but may use larger sizes like buckwheat. They can be used as primary heat, supplementary heat or have a dual set up with your existing oil/gas furnace.
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farok
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Posts: 56
Joined: Fri. Aug. 01, 2008 7:40 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Pioneer top vent
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Yukon/Eagle
Location: Milford, NJ

Post Fri. Oct. 16, 2009 9:34 pm

I don't remember reading any rules about replying to old threads... if there is one, please let me know and I won't do it again.

Anyway, I remember reading this post a couple years back when I was considering a stoker instead of the hand-fired furnace. Noise was one of my concerns, so I planned a similar setup for when I purchased my stoker, a Leisure Line Pioneer. My suspicions were confirmed when I fired the stoker up a week ago. Don't get me wrong, I'm VERY pleased with the unit; it works beautifully! But why not try to quiet it a little more? I have the stove right in the middle of my living room so it couldn't hurt.

My other concern was fresh air for the stove. I have a fairly tight house, and when I ran the furnace, I had to keep a window open near the furnace, or the fire would actually go out! So this mod kills two birds with one stone for me!

Anyway, after about $20 of supplies, I performed a similar mod to what av8r did with the combustion fan, and since his pictures aren't loading for me anymore, I wanted to post a few pictures I took, and cover how I did it, for anyone else stumbling on this post. I bought a galvanized 4" (I think!) round pipe takeoff (crimped on one side, and a bunch of tabs on the other side) -- can't remember exactly the size -- and bent all but one tab on each "side" of the take off in to all more air flow. I drilled the remaining two tabs to line up with the bolt holes on the combustion fan and attached it. I then took a length of dryer duct and attached it. Now for the rest of the setup. In my case, I couldn't use the plenum in the wall to just attach the pipe to, as it's sealed at the top in the attic, I assume as a fire guard. Also I have no basement. :( So I used 3" thin-wall PVC pipe, ran through the wall into a 90 degree elbow, and ran up to the ceiling. I have about 2 feet of pipe sticking up in the attic to make sure I don't pull in any insulation or anything else that may be up there. I used 3" thin wall since it's cheap, and larger ID than the intake to the combustion fan. I ran through the wall since I didn't want the PVC in the living room, and the other side of the wall is just a hallway leading to the laundry room and mud room... who cares about the pipe in there?

With it all said and done, I estimate I have quieted the combustion fan noise down to maybe half of what it was beforehand. Well worth the $20 and the hour of measuring and cutting PVC and sheet rock. The total list of supplies for anyone looking to try is:
- 4" duct takeoff
- 4" flexible dryer duct
- 2 clamps
- PVC reducer: 4" schedule 40 pipe to 3" thin-wall pipe
- length of 3" thin-wall PVC
- 90 degree thin-wall PVC adapters as needed

Pictures are below. I suppose if I really wanted to quiet it down more, I could move the fan, but this seemed like the simplest method, and I don't mind a little white noise. I suppose I could also add a gasket between the duct take-off and the fan, but again the noise gain here is minimal for me. Thanks again av8r for the original idea!!

Chris
Attachments
IMG_0339.jpg
duct attached to the combustion fan
IMG_0340.jpg
this is all you see if you peek between the stove and the wall
IMG_0341.jpg
the pipe in the hallway... just about as wide as the door frame, and right next to it, so it's very unobtrusive
IMG_0342.jpg
I needed to go around a couple ceiling joists out the top side

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009to090
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Posts: 5104
Joined: Fri. Jan. 30, 2009 10:02 am
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 520 HighBoy
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: DVC-500 x 2
Coal Size/Type: Anthracite Rice
Location: Warrenton, NC

Post Fri. Oct. 16, 2009 9:53 pm

Chris, that looks great! Nice and clean. I bet if you spray-painted the flex-duct black, where it runs behind the stove, it would blend right in. :idea:
If it ain't broke, don't fix it!


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Horace
Member
Posts: 496
Joined: Thu. Sep. 18, 2008 12:15 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Harman ST8-VF8 / Frankenstove
Location: Central PA

Post Fri. Oct. 16, 2009 11:45 pm

Very nice, and good thinking to go to the attic. Could you use a few feet of straight-pipe just on the right had side where it meets the wall? Might make it look a bit cleaner, and you could paint it the same as the walls or trim.

Now, just move the distribution blower (that's my loud blower) into the other room and make it nearly silent!
The best weapon and tool one can ever possess is patience.

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farok
Member
Posts: 56
Joined: Fri. Aug. 01, 2008 7:40 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Pioneer top vent
Hand Fed Coal Furnace: Yukon/Eagle
Location: Milford, NJ

Post Sat. Oct. 17, 2009 8:11 am

Both great ideas. For now I'll probably leave as-is, since I have a decorative coal bucket, the grain shovel, and another small shovel and rake in front of the hose, so you can't really see it anyway. If I ever clear out that side, I'll definitely do on of the two.

Chris

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