Cleaned Glass

A Coal stoker furnace or stove controls most operations including automatically feeding the coal. They are quite similar to any conventional oil and gas units and easily operated for extended periods of time. They commonly use rice coal but may use larger sizes like buckwheat. They can be used as primary heat, supplementary heat or have a dual set up with your existing oil/gas furnace.
geakin
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Posts: 9
Joined: Sat. Nov. 19, 2011 5:44 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing III
Location: State College, Pa

Post Sat. Nov. 19, 2011 6:01 pm

I've read a "large" number of post concerning etching of glass on stokers. The concept of polishing the glass sounded like the only practical solution short of buying new glass. The glass is in rough shape. My Alaska Channer is starting it's 5th winter.
Being a cheapskate, I remembered that I have medium and fine drywall sanding sponges. They worked. We'll see how well the glass stays clean.


BeerMonley
Member
Posts: 215
Joined: Mon. Aug. 11, 2008 8:39 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Lesiure Line
Coal Size/Type: rice
Stove/Furnace Make: Lesiure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Pocono
Location: Lake Winola PA

Post Mon. Nov. 21, 2011 9:25 pm

so you sanded them to clean them? I was just gona post about how I should clean them. did you just dry sand them? what about steel wool? ive used that to clean car windows before

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fastcat
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Posts: 443
Joined: Thu. Nov. 12, 2009 11:50 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Nut/Stove Mix
Location: CNY (McGraw)

Post Mon. Nov. 21, 2011 9:31 pm

Try orange hand cleaner with pumis from your auto parts store.
This is only my two cents
and sometimes it is not worth that

plumber
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Posts: 375
Joined: Sun. Mar. 27, 2011 10:52 am
Stoker Coal Boiler: EFM 350
Location: Bridgeton, RI

Post Mon. Nov. 28, 2011 3:17 pm

A damp rag dipped in flyash works great.
Ernie

Feet and knees together

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freetown fred
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Posts: 21421
Joined: Thu. Dec. 31, 2009 12:33 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: HITZER 50-93
Coal Size/Type: BLASCHAK Nut
Location: Freetown,NY 13803

Post Mon. Nov. 28, 2011 3:21 pm

Yea, but plumber, where the heck can one find this fly ash stuff?? toothy
"A people that values it's privileges above it's principals, soon loses both"--Dwight D Eisenhower

Dann757
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Posts: 3365
Joined: Sat. Sep. 06, 2008 9:10 am

Post Mon. Nov. 28, 2011 4:04 pm

My glass is 4" x 4", just got inspired and took it out. It looks like the brown color is baked right into the glass. It's fine with coal, it's the paper, cardboard and wood that I start up with that soots up the glass. I was using a long handle gasket scraper with a single edge razor blade to keep it clean. I just tried Ajax on it, no effect. shouldn't be much to replace it. Going to try some wet sanding on it why not.

geakin
New Member
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat. Nov. 19, 2011 5:44 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing III
Location: State College, Pa

Post Mon. Nov. 28, 2011 6:21 pm

Drywall sanding sponge cleaned the glass completely for a little while but it did fog back up. A polishing wheel would make it stay clean a little longer but I agree with most that the flyash, heat and acid etches the glass.

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av8r
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Posts: 1163
Joined: Thu. Dec. 06, 2007 12:07 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Leisure Line Hearth with twin turbos (sounds like it)
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Hearth model with twin turbos
Location: Near Owego, NY

Post Mon. Nov. 28, 2011 6:28 pm

geakin wrote:Drywall sanding sponge cleaned the glass completely for a little while but it did fog back up. A polishing wheel would make it stay clean a little longer but I agree with most that the flyash, heat and acid etches the glass.
After a couple of seasons you will not get it clean. I've used a flapwheel and couldn't touch it.
"Fools you are. To say you learn by your experience. I prefer to profit by others' mistakes and avoid the price of my own."

- Otto von Bismarck


geakin
New Member
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat. Nov. 19, 2011 5:44 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Alaska
Stove/Furnace Model: Channing III
Location: State College, Pa

Post Mon. Nov. 28, 2011 6:33 pm

I'm starting my 4th season.

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av8r
Member
Posts: 1163
Joined: Thu. Dec. 06, 2007 12:07 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Leisure Line Hearth with twin turbos (sounds like it)
Stove/Furnace Make: Leisure Line
Stove/Furnace Model: Hearth model with twin turbos
Location: Near Owego, NY

Post Tue. Nov. 29, 2011 8:12 pm

geakin wrote:I'm starting my 4th season.
????
"Fools you are. To say you learn by your experience. I prefer to profit by others' mistakes and avoid the price of my own."

- Otto von Bismarck

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2001Sierra
Member
Posts: 1845
Joined: Wed. May. 20, 2009 8:09 am
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Keystoker 90 Chimney vent
Coal Size/Type: Rice
Other Heating: Buderus Oil Boiler 3115-34
Stove/Furnace Model: Keystoker 90 Chimney Vent
Location: Wynantskill NY, 10 miles from Albany

Post Tue. Nov. 29, 2011 8:25 pm

If someone can come up with a solution for us "Stokers" it would be HUGE. The hand fed folks have no clue what we are talking about. I was one for 28 years, and never contended with what a stoker can do to a window be it glass or ceramic :x

TCOAL
Member
Posts: 39
Joined: Mon. Jan. 01, 2007 6:46 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: dvc-500
Location: NE PA.

Post Sun. Dec. 11, 2011 8:56 pm

Have been burning a DVC-500 for 4 years. Have tried everying to clean glass without any success. Just starting using a very wet micro fiber cloth for the last month. Is the best thing for glass cleaning I have used in the last 4 years..Give it a shot, let me know, I think you will like it.

Vinmaker
Member
Posts: 243
Joined: Fri. Nov. 25, 2011 9:17 am
Stove/Furnace Make: HARMAN
Stove/Furnace Model: SF-250
Location: Central MA

Post Wed. Dec. 14, 2011 7:34 pm

I agree with all the frustration here. I can't seem to keep the glass clean either. I have resorted to using a razor blade scrapper to scrape off the stuff. But this will just make things harder if the glass gets scratched. Not sure why the coal is doing this to our glass. With wood, I get it. Lots of smoke and soot given off. But with coal, you can't see anything given of by the burn.

hcarlow
Member
Posts: 210
Joined: Wed. Mar. 21, 2012 7:44 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL 110
Location: Northern Maine (Houlton area)

Post Sat. Nov. 17, 2012 12:54 pm

I have to agree with TCoal as the micro cloth works great for cleaning up the glass window in my wl110 boiler . I've taken it out a couple times to clean with the fly ash and a little water and that does a pretty good job but I noticed today it was getting foggy so I took a very fine micro disc I had for a wood cabinet project and tried that with a little water and just a dab of dawn dish detergent and the glass came out looking like new . I have no idea if it will keep working over the long haul as I have only been burning coal for about 5 weeks now . The window in the 110 gets very dirty after a week or so . I noticed in the advertisement when I bought the micro fiber material a few years ago they mentioned they use this for cleaning up aircraft pasenger windows also .

baddawg
Member
Posts: 188
Joined: Fri. Sep. 02, 2011 7:19 pm
Hot Air Coal Stoker Furnace: Leisure Line Pioneer
Location: My Place

Post Sun. Nov. 18, 2012 8:24 am

As many times as I told myself I am not reading the "how to clean glass" posts anymore.... :hammer: here I am again. Must stop myself.... But anyway, gave up on cleaning the glass last year, it was fun for the first couple of months. I am thinking of buying a new piece of glass and putting about 10 coats of turtle wax ICE wax on it (stuff is super slick) and see how long I could stay interested in having clean glass again. Anybody try something like this with a brand new piece of glass??

I'm down to wondering how funny all these "glass" posts would be if you took the "gl" out of them. NO I have not been drinking, YET.
ALCOHOL
TOBACCO &
FIREARMS
should be a convenience store, not a government agency.


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