Lil' Heater

A Coal stoker furnace or stove controls most operations including automatically feeding the coal. They are quite similar to any conventional oil and gas units and easily operated for extended periods of time. They commonly use rice coal but may use larger sizes like buckwheat. They can be used as primary heat, supplementary heat or have a dual set up with your existing oil/gas furnace.
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fastcat
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Joined: Thu. Nov. 12, 2009 11:50 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Nut/Stove Mix
Location: CNY (McGraw)

Post Sat. Jan. 01, 2011 11:24 am

Dave does the Lil' Heater come with a top vent or bottom or both?
This is only my two cents
and sometimes it is not worth that

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Flyer5
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Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL110
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Pioneer
Location: Montrose PA
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Post Sat. Jan. 01, 2011 4:11 pm

fastcat wrote:Dave does the Lil' Heater come with a top vent or bottom or both?
As of right now it is a bottom vent only . I built a top vent for myself and it was a pain in the backside getting the tubes just right . But I guess it can be done again if necessary . Thanks ,Dave and Happy New Year
http://www.leisurelinestove.com


You know when people say it was "better back in my day"?

They were right.

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fastcat
Member
Posts: 443
Joined: Thu. Nov. 12, 2009 11:50 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Nut/Stove Mix
Location: CNY (McGraw)

Post Sat. Jan. 01, 2011 8:56 pm

I would think you could use a power vent on this stove right? What would the average electric usage be for the power vent a month?
This is only my two cents
and sometimes it is not worth that


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Flyer5
Verified Business Rep.
Posts: 10382
Joined: Sun. Oct. 21, 2007 4:23 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Leisure Line WL110
Hot Air Coal Stoker Stove: Leisure Line Pioneer
Location: Montrose PA
Contact:

Post Sat. Jan. 01, 2011 8:59 pm

fastcat wrote:I would think you could use a power vent on this stove right? What would the average electric usage be for the power vent a month?
Yes it can be power vented . Not sure on the electric costs ,maybe someone running one can jump in here . Just curious,can you run a chimney ?
http://www.leisurelinestove.com


You know when people say it was "better back in my day"?

They were right.

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Richard S.
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Joined: Fri. Oct. 01, 2004 8:35 pm
Stoker Coal Boiler: Van Wert VA1200
Coal Size/Type: Buckwheat/Anthracite
Location: NEPA

Post Sat. Jan. 01, 2011 9:17 pm

fastcat wrote:What would the average electric usage be for the power vent a month?
Take the wattage and multiply by the hours of use, for example a light bulb running 10 hours a day for 30 days would be 300 hours. If it were a 60 watt lightbulb:

60*300 = 18,000 watt hours

Divide by 1000 to get kilowatt hours:

18,000 / 1000 = 18kWh

Multiply the kilowatt hours by your electric rate, if it's 10 cents/kWh:

18 *10 = 180 cents or $1.80
"The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits."

- Albert Einstein

User avatar
fastcat
Member
Posts: 443
Joined: Thu. Nov. 12, 2009 11:50 pm
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Hitzer 50-93
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Nut/Stove Mix
Location: CNY (McGraw)

Post Sun. Jan. 02, 2011 10:48 am

Flyer5 wrote:
fastcat wrote:I would think you could use a power vent on this stove right? What would the average electric usage be for the power vent a month?
Yes it can be power vented . Not sure on the electric costs ,maybe someone running one can jump in here . Just curious,can you run a chimney ?
Dave I could install another chimney but would rather not if possible, I'm running a hand fired from the basement and want this to ease the load on that stove. Heating 2400 sq ft and the one stove is fine, house is 72-73*. I figure if I can run the two stoves when it is really cold I can cut coal usage.
Richard S. wrote:
fastcat wrote:What would the average electric usage be for the power vent a month?
Take the wattage and multiply by the hours of use, for example a light bulb running 10 hours a day for 30 days would be 300 hours. If it were a 60 watt lightbulb:

60*300 = 18,000 watt hours

Divide by 1000 to get kilowatt hours:

18,000 / 1000 = 18kWh

Multiply the kilowatt hours by your electric rate, if it's 10 cents/kWh:

18 *10 = 180 cents or $1.80
Thanks Richard that is exactly what I was looking for.
This is only my two cents
and sometimes it is not worth that

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