Casters

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tcalo
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Post By: tcalo » Mon. Sep. 10, 2018 1:07 pm

I usually tuck my stove in the corner of the room for the summer. Tired of dragging it around the room and marking up my floor. Looking to get a set of casters to move it around. Any suggestions?


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Post By: franco b » Mon. Sep. 10, 2018 2:24 pm

I would just use a hand truck. Wide rubber wheels to protect floor which small caster wheels might not. Fast and convenient as well.

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tcalo
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Post By: tcalo » Thu. Sep. 13, 2018 8:07 pm

Thanks for the info. I'm wondering if people move there stoves out of the way in the off season, and if so I wonder what they use. I was looking into casters but I think it would be a pain to get the legs up and into the cradle of the caster. I was also looking into the nylon furniture moving discs. I've used them to move couches on hardwood before and they work surprisingly well. Not sure how well it would work with a heavy stove sliding across tile?

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Post By: coaledsweat » Thu. Sep. 13, 2018 8:12 pm

You should lay down a carpet or runner, especially on tile. Rent a hand truck if you have to, you'll need that back again. A few burley friends or relatives can make life easier. Of course there should be an obligatory bribe involved.

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Post By: northernmainecoal » Thu. Sep. 27, 2018 6:52 am

tcalo wrote:
Thu. Sep. 13, 2018 8:07 pm
Thanks for the info. I'm wondering if people move there stoves out of the way in the off season, and if so I wonder what they use. I was looking into casters but I think it would be a pain to get the legs up and into the cradle of the caster. I was also looking into the nylon furniture moving discs. I've used them to move couches on hardwood before and they work surprisingly well. Not sure how well it would work with a heavy stove sliding across tile?

the furniture movers work surprisingly well for heavy stoves as well. I've used them a few times to move stoves in and out

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Post By: Sunny Boy » Thu. Sep. 27, 2018 11:35 am

tcalo wrote:
Thu. Sep. 13, 2018 8:07 pm
Thanks for the info. I'm wondering if people move there stoves out of the way in the off season, and if so I wonder what they use. I was looking into casters but I think it would be a pain to get the legs up and into the cradle of the caster. I was also looking into the nylon furniture moving discs. I've used them to move couches on hardwood before and they work surprisingly well. Not sure how well it would work with a heavy stove sliding across tile?
Tommy,
It was a common job in era of these old stoves. It was called, "Putting up the stove".

Here's some insight how to "properly" put up an old stove. :D
http://victoriandecorating.blogspot.com/2008/07/p ... -1871.html

Paul

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Post By: KingCoal » Thu. Sep. 27, 2018 8:38 pm

and that is why my stoves are simply taken out of the thimble pipe and all and closed up with damprid, and damprid in the bottom of the chimney liner and capped off at the wall and the stove slid back 6 inches and hooked back up the next time.

unless i happen to be using a new stove that year....................or half way thru the season.........................

steve

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tcalo
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Post By: tcalo » Thu. Sep. 27, 2018 9:39 pm

Good read Paul


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tcalo
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Post By: tcalo » Mon. Oct. 15, 2018 9:13 am

Bought some casters a few weeks ago through Amazon. Not bad, I think they ran me about $5 a piece. Worked great. Stove is in place, hooked up, polished and ready to go!
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Post By: rberq » Mon. Oct. 15, 2018 5:04 pm

KingCoal wrote:
Thu. Sep. 27, 2018 8:38 pm
and that is why my stoves are simply taken out of the thimble pipe and all and closed up with damprid, and damprid in the bottom of the chimney liner and capped off at the wall and the stove slid back 6 inches and hooked back up the next time.
I closed up my stove one year and tightly capped the baro opening. By fall the baro had rusted so much it had to be replaced. Similarly I tightly capped the opening into the stainless steel chimney, and in six weeks there was some rust showing inside the chimney. If I leave them open -- or if I cap the chimney opening with fiberglass window screening to allow airflow -- then no rust. Damprid would probably make it even better.

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Post By: Qtown1835 » Mon. Oct. 15, 2018 9:05 pm

What about a motorcycle jack. Not sure about the dimensions but they are hydraulic and some models have wheels.

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Post By: Wren » Mon. Oct. 15, 2018 9:19 pm

I like the humour in properly putting up a stove. Like the family sitting on the fence because the stove was too hot.

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Post By: NoSmoke » Wed. Oct. 17, 2018 6:54 am

I am always late to the party, but I have used skateboards to move heavy objects like stoves for years. They can be had for very little money at yard sales.

They cannot be spun around like casters, but a lot of times you do not want them to...far easier to just push in a straight line, then readjust for the next push along.

To get heavy stoves up, I have used staging to accomplish this since staging (also called scaffolding) can be brought into a room in sections. I set the sections up, put (2) 2x6's on edge, attach a come-a-long and strap, and up the stove goes.

I did this for my New Yorker WC 90 when I wanted it off the floor more so that Katie would not have to stoop over to put wood/coal into it. You know Katie and her love of stiletto heels (84 pairs and counting).

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Post By: tcalo » Wed. Oct. 17, 2018 7:54 am

NoSmoke wrote:
Wed. Oct. 17, 2018 6:54 am
You know Katie and her love of stiletto heels (84 pairs and counting).
Haha, must be a girl thing. I keep telling my wife I don’t understand the infatuation over shoes. She said the same thing about my love for coal stoves!

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Post By: NoSmoke » Wed. Oct. 17, 2018 7:01 pm

In some ways I have brought this upon myself. Katie's first husband was very short, so Katie was never allowed to wear high heels as it would make her taller than him. That kind of upset her as she loves stilettos. Since I am taller than her, I do not care what she wears.

I tend to be a minimalist on just about everything, but Katie...and her (2) shoe-of-the-month-clubs, might be a tad too much. But we do go to church, and as a career, she is a banker so she wears high heels a lot. That kind of justifies it.
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