Harman Grate Edges and Ash Removal

Modern and vintage hand fired coal stove are similar to a wood stove and in some cases can burn either. They need to be regulated and fed by hand usually every 12 to 24 hours depending on your usage. They require no power to operate making them ideal for rural settings with long power outages.
Post Reply
User avatar
Uglysquirrel
Member
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon. Jan. 07, 2008 8:27 pm
Stove/Furnace Model: Pocono

Post Fri. Jan. 23, 2009 10:02 pm

With all the poking discussions though this is related.

Next time you have to stop your fire (Devill says never!!) take a look that the sharp edges formed in the casting process between the top surface of the grate and the ash slots. There seems to be absolutely no radius. Was a thinking a nice approx .030 -.050" radius on the ash slot edges would help ash slip thru a lot easier while still holding the coal back. Getting rid of the sharp edges would also extend the grate life by lowering the stress risers at the edge.

This is could only be done on the hottest of summer days with an air grinder while sing Christmas songs after a case of beer. And wind that grinder up next to your neighbors bedroom window at 9 pm.

Waz the vote, you think this maybe is worth a try ?

warm now
New Member
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue. Oct. 07, 2008 4:35 am
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: Mark III
Location: N.E. Pa

Post Sat. Jan. 24, 2009 1:54 am

Rounding over the edges may help the ash drop through but may also allow klinkers to get stuck. I would think the sharp edges would help crush and break up the klinkers and unburnt pieces of coal letting them fall through rather than jam the grates. I haven't looked at mine to see if the edges are sharp or rounded but would expect all grates from the company to be the same. Just my 2 cents.

User avatar
JB Sparks
Member
Posts: 842
Joined: Sun. Oct. 19, 2008 8:09 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman - Chubby
Stove/Furnace Model: Harman: SF160 - Chubby Sr.
Location: north central Mass.

Post Sat. Jan. 24, 2009 5:56 am

Uglysquirrel, I think you should just sit down and have another a beer, all that grinding sounds like way too much work for any possible benefit. besides the sharp edges helps break up the clinkers easier.

Visit Hitzer Stoves

Jack Magnum
Member
Posts: 188
Joined: Mon. May. 05, 2008 10:34 am
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: TLC-2000
Location: Cossayuna lake in N.Y.

Post Sat. Jan. 24, 2009 7:18 am

Uglysquirrel wrote:With all the poking discussions though this is related.

Next time you have to stop your fire (Devill says never!!) take a look that the sharp edges formed in the casting process between the top surface of the grate and the ash slots. There seems to be absolutely no radius. Was a thinking a nice approx .030 -.050" radius on the ash slot edges would help ash slip thru a lot easier while still holding the coal back. Getting rid of the sharp edges would also extend the grate life by lowering the stress risers at the edge.

This is could only be done on the hottest of summer days with an air grinder while sing Christmas songs after a case of beer. And wind that grinder up next to your neighbors bedroom window at 9 pm.

Waz the vote, you think this maybe is worth a try ?
I am new to coal burning but the design you state may be intentional . Maybe to help brak up stuck coal better.

User avatar
Devil505
Member
Posts: 7110
Joined: Tue. Jul. 03, 2007 10:44 pm
Stove/Furnace Make: Harman
Stove/Furnace Model: TLC-2000
Location: SE Massachusetts

Post Sat. Jan. 24, 2009 7:33 am

I have to agree with the others......Sounds like too much work for a small, possible benefit.
War is a game that is played with a smile. If you can't smile, grin. If you can't grin, keep out of the way till you can.
Winston Churchill
Shaking & Poking The TLC2000 Video

User avatar
Uglysquirrel
Member
Posts: 1160
Joined: Mon. Jan. 07, 2008 8:27 pm
Stove/Furnace Model: Pocono

Post Sat. Jan. 24, 2009 4:28 pm

All of you brought up some good things I did'nt think about. Think I'll hold off...but the beer, well...

Thanks fur the input, gentlemen.

Post Reply

Return to “Hand Fired Coal Stoves & Furnaces Using Anthracite”