Almost There Need Some Advice Yet.

Modern and vintage hand fired coal stove are similar to a wood stove and in some cases can burn either. They need to be regulated and fed by hand usually every 12 to 24 hours depending on your usage. They require no power to operate making them ideal for rural settings with long power outages.
Joe B
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Post Wed. Oct. 08, 2008 6:15 pm

Could pea/rice work?

Joe B
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Post Wed. Oct. 08, 2008 6:32 pm

Can pea/rice work?

rberq
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: DS Machine 1300 with hopper
Coal Size/Type: Blaschak Anthracite Nut
Other Heating: Oil hot water radiators (fuel oil); propane
Location: Central Maine

Post Wed. Oct. 08, 2008 7:14 pm

Pea might help, as long as the grates don't let it fall through. It will burn slower than nut with the same draft, as you are seeing with the higher stovepipe temps with nut. Rice would probably be too small. 20 to 25 pounds of coal should easily give you an eight-hour burn if you can control the draft. And if you have a very strong draft you eventually should install a baro. I think you said you couldn't find one -- check with your local heating system supplier for the Field RC baro or "draft control" as they call it, most oil-fired systems use them so they should be available, somewhere in the $25 to $30 price range.
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LsFarm
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Stoker Coal Boiler: Axeman Anderson 260
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Post Wed. Oct. 08, 2008 7:18 pm

A 'very strong draft' will be pulling too much air throught he coal, burnng it faster than you want.. controling the maximum draft is what a brometric damper is designed to do..
You SHOULD be able to shut doe the fire by shutting off the air to the fire.. but it appears that you have some air leaks somewhere..
With only 20# of coal, maybe 6-8 hours is the max duration you can expect.. I'm not sure, I've never burnt a small stove..

Greg L
Burning Pea/Buckwheat through an antique stoker [semi retired SSboiler],
Running an Axeman-Anderson 260M boiler burning Pea, About 150-250#per day
Farming, Fixing, Fabricating and Flying: 'spare time' what's that?

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SemperFi
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Post Wed. Oct. 08, 2008 10:30 pm

Joe b, a baro damper should help you by the sounds of your problem. If your stove is pulling air to hard then a baro will lessen the draw by opening and allowing room air to enter lessining the draft on the stove. Some old cook stoves had manual air inlets in the flue pipe ( sliding tin door ) to lessen the draft through the coal bed by allowing room air to enter the flu. Most old cook stoves were not air tight by no stretch of the imagination. The down side to using a baro to lessen draft on the stove is that you are drawing heated air out of your house, but if it slowes the burn and gets you acceptable cycle times then whats a few pounds of coal realy worth anyway if it allowes you to heat all day. How full is your stove with 20 lbs of nut in it? How far from the top of the cook top is it?
If you can keep your head while those around you are losing theirs, you may have misjudged the situation.

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Devil505
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Post Thu. Oct. 09, 2008 10:52 am

SemperFi wrote:The down side to using a baro to lessen draft on the stove is that you are drawing heated air out of your house,
I would also worry that weakening the draft would create a real CO danger from a stove that obviously leaks like a sieve. :fear:
At least a strong draft will pull the CO out of the house. I would stop/lesson the leaks b4 weakening the draft.
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coaledsweat
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Post Thu. Oct. 09, 2008 11:05 am

SemperFi wrote:The down side to using a baro to lessen draft on the stove is that you are drawing heated air out of your house.
This is a fallacy, there is no "downside". The baro improves the operating efficiency, cost input vs. heat output. The room air is considerably less expensive than the superheated air in the appliance.

Devil, it doesn't weaken the draft, it limits it to a set point. A strong draft doesn't just remove CO, it removes your expensive heat for you too.
Nothing is impossible for people who don't have to do it themselves.

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Devil505
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Post Thu. Oct. 09, 2008 11:16 am

coaledsweat wrote:Devil, it doesn't weaken the draft, it limits it to a set point. A strong draft doesn't just remove CO, it removes your expensive heat for you too.
I stand corrected. :surrender:
War is a game that is played with a smile. If you can't smile, grin. If you can't grin, keep out of the way till you can.
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