Glenwood Kitchen Heater

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keegs
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Location: Bridgewater, ME
Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby (main floor)
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Post by keegs » Wed. Oct. 16, 2019 1:42 pm


Anyone have an idea what the BTU output on this is?

 
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Sunny Boy
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Location: Central NY
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Post by Sunny Boy » Wed. Oct. 16, 2019 3:18 pm

The antique stoves didn't have BTU ratings.

The GW Kitchen heaters that I've seen,... the firebox is about the same size as my small GW range. Which holds about 20 lbs of nut coal. By tracking how much coal it burns in 24 hours we figured the range is about 15K BTU.

But that heater has far less surface area to extract the heat than even the smallest ranges, so it's not as efficient a heater as a range. A lot of the heat is going up the chimney. My guess is it's more like 8-10K BTU.

Paul

 
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keegs
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Post by keegs » Wed. Oct. 16, 2019 4:40 pm

Thanks... Looks to be in remarkably good condition.

 
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freetown fred
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Post by freetown fred » Wed. Oct. 16, 2019 4:51 pm

Nice summary Paul. She's a cute lil critter K. :)

 
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keegs
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Post by keegs » Wed. Oct. 16, 2019 5:36 pm

..agree on both accounts FF.

Kinda looks like an earlier version of an apartment stove.

My sense is you may not want radiant heat from cooking operations to put you out of the house (especially during summer months)


 
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Wren
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Post by Wren » Wed. Oct. 16, 2019 6:01 pm

Very pretty. Beautiful enamel. Probably surprise you with heat output. My little Tiger doesn’t hold much but it put out lots of heat. And someone on this forum has said that they don’t know anyone who was ever disappointed in a Glenwood.

 
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keegs
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby (main floor)
Coal Size/Type: nut

Post by keegs » Wed. Oct. 16, 2019 7:35 pm

Haven't been around coal stoves long enough to truly appreciate what you describe Wren. The Glenwoods do look sweet though.

 
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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 21860
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Location: Central NY
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Post by Sunny Boy » Wed. Oct. 16, 2019 11:44 pm

keegs wrote:
Wed. Oct. 16, 2019 5:36 pm
..agree on both accounts FF.

Kinda looks like an earlier version of an apartment stove.

My sense is you may not want radiant heat from cooking operations to put you out of the house (especially during summer months)
Those kitchen heaters were sold to cook on for small kitchens that did not have space for a regular kitchen range - which needs more space because of having an oven. Much like today using an electric hot plate to cook on in a small apartment.

Paul

 
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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 21860
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Location: Central NY
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Post by Sunny Boy » Thu. Oct. 17, 2019 8:57 am

After a long cold weather power outage at our house in Saratoga, which has gas/hot water heat, gas DHW, and an electric stove, life got rather unbearable. I seriously looked into getting one of those GW Kitchen heaters to install in one corner of the kitchen.

Melissa voted it down. Rather than take up space in the already small kitchen there, she just shut off the water and came to our house here with the coal stoves.

Those GW kitchen heaters are well built. Plus, they have the same type triangular coal grates as the Glenwood Ranges, Oaks, and Base heaters that are easy to shake ash well and they do an excellent job of daily grinding and dumping clinkers before they can become a problem.

Paul

 
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keegs
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Hand Fed Coal Stove: Chubby (main floor)
Coal Size/Type: nut

Post by keegs » Thu. Oct. 17, 2019 1:09 pm

We put in a generator a few years ago. It's expensive with service contract, fuel and annual fuel tank rental. But we were w/out electricity for one day shy of three weeks during Sandy and didn't want to go through that again.

Looking forward to observing how the Bridgewater house performs after finally getting around to insulating the attic this past summer. The Chubby has done fine in past winters, even in sub zero temps. But I figure I won't need to run it as hot now with things more buttoned up.... maybe extend a little... the time between refuelings and save a few bucks too.


 
stovehospital
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Post by stovehospital » Sat. Nov. 02, 2019 8:56 am

Kitchen heaters are transitional stoves. When folks switched to gas the kitchens were cold in the Winter so many companies produced "kitchen heaters" to provide heat. They work very well for that purpose .
Just a suggestion: do not take a Glenwood kitchen heater apart. for a rebuild , if possible. the panels are flat and tend to warp over time. It takes about three people to put one back together.

 
stovehospital
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Post by stovehospital » Sat. Nov. 02, 2019 9:11 am

They are remarkable heaters though. People think these are direct draft, however they are not; they are full recirculators! They have similar passages as a range and the hot gasses travel down the right side and under the ash pit toward the back of the stove and then up the back side to eventually exit the flue when in the recirculate mode. Glenwood dealers and marketing agents saw that the kitchen heater was often being ordered with a small four burner gas range in a pair. They at first started to offer this pair together and then offered a combined unit called the Glenwood Utility which put them both together in one common frame. All in all, both are great stoves in a time when people were transitioning from solid fuel to gas for cooking and furnaces for heating the home. These filled the gap!

 
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Sunny Boy
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Posts: 21860
Joined: Mon. Nov. 11, 2013 1:40 pm
Location: Central NY
Hand Fed Coal Boiler: Anthracite Industrial, domestic hot water heater
Baseburners & Antiques: Glenwood range 208, # 6 base heater, 2 Modern Oak 118.
Coal Size/Type: Nuts !
Other Heating: Oil &electric plenum furnace

Post by Sunny Boy » Sat. Nov. 02, 2019 9:56 am

A few years back, after several days of power outage in our other house, I came close to buying one of these kitchen heaters. With that being an all electric house we couldn't even heat hot water.

I have plenty of double wall stainless stove pipe left over from a previous owner's Yodel wood stove and figured it would make a good backup heat system that can be used to cook on, too. Without taking up as much space as a range.

But with that kitchen being rather small, I got voted down by the cook. :cry:

Paul

 
MaryMiller
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Post by MaryMiller » Sun. Mar. 14, 2021 9:29 am

It's in excellent condition ! It's cool that you kept it so well because it's hard in our day to find something like this.

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